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Isle of Skye

<b>Isle of Skye</b>Posted by GLADMANImage © Robert Gladstone
Also known as:
  • Eilean a' Cheò
  • Eilean Sgiathannach

See individual sites for details

Added by TMA Ed

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Web searches for Isle of Skye

Sites in this group:

4 posts
Achadh Nam Bard Standing Stone / Menhir
10 posts
Achaoh A'Chuirn Chambered Cairn
1 post
An Corran Cave / Rock Shelter
37 posts
An Sithean Chambered Cairn
2 posts
Armadale Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
7 posts
Barpa Cairn(s)
35 posts
Beinn na Cailleach Cairn(s)
10 posts
Beinn Na Caillich Chambered Cairn
7 posts
Beinn na Caillich Cairn(s)
9 posts
Boreraig Stone Circle
12 posts
Borve (Isle of Skye) Stone Row / Alignment
6 posts
Cadha nan Ingrean Stone Fort / Dun
8 posts
Cadha Riach Chambered Cairn
9 posts
Carn Ban Stone Fort / Dun
9 posts
Carn Liath, Kensaleyre Chambered Cairn
12 posts
Carn Liath, Kilmuir Chambered Cairn
9 posts
Carn Liath, Struanmore Chambered Cairn
1 post
Clachan Fhuarain Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
Clach Ard Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Clach na h'annait Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Clach Oscar Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Claigan Souterrain Souterrain
16 posts
Cnocan Nan Cobhar Long Cairn
15 posts
Cnoc Ullinish Chambered Tomb
5 posts
Creagan Soillier Stone Fort / Dun
7 posts
Creag Nam Meann Stone Fort / Dun
10 posts
Cuidrach Stone Setting Stone Circle
19 posts
Druim Dubh Cairn(s)
4 posts
Dunanellerich Stone Fort / Dun
6 posts
Dunan an Aisilidh Stone Fort / Dun
6 posts
Dun Acardinon Stone Fort / Dun
3 posts
Dun A'Cheitechin Broch
1 post
Dun a'Chleirich Stone Fort / Dun
5 posts
Dun Adhamh Stone Fort / Dun
5 posts
Dun Alighlinn Broch
13 posts
Dun Ardtreck Broch
12 posts
Dun Ard an t-Sabhail Broch
12 posts
Dun Arkaig Broch
1 post
Dun Ban Stone Fort / Dun
23 posts
Dun Beag Broch
3 posts
Dun Beag, Balmeanach Hillfort
1 post
Dun Beag Cairn Cairn(s)
1 post
Dun Beag (Cairn) Cairn(s)
1 post
Dun Beag (Loch Slapin) Stone Fort / Dun
5 posts
Dun Bernisdale Stone Fort / Dun (Destroyed)
6 posts
Dun Boreraig Stone Fort / Dun
12 posts
Dun Boreraig (Duirinish) Broch
5 posts
Dun Bornasketaig Stone Fort / Dun
8 posts
Dun Borrafiach Broch
11 posts
Dun Borve Broch
4 posts
Dun Borve, Cuidrach Stone Fort / Dun
5 posts
Dun Borve (Greshornish) Broch
5 posts
Dun Chaich Stone Fort / Dun
4 posts
Dun Chlo Stone Fort / Dun (Destroyed)
6 posts
Dun Cnoc a'Sga Stone Fort / Dun
10 posts
Dun Colbost Broch
9 posts
Dun Cruinn Stone Fort / Dun
6 posts
Dun Dearg Stone Fort / Dun
10 posts
Dun Diarmaid, Bracadale Broch
4 posts
Dun Druim nan Slochd Stone Fort / Dun
7 posts
Dun Edinbane Broch
9 posts
Dun Ela Stone Fort / Dun
7 posts
Dun Eyre Stone Fort / Dun
6 posts
Dun Fada Stone Fort / Dun
6 posts
Dun Faich Stone Fort / Dun
3 posts
Dun Feorlig Broch
13 posts
Dun Fiadhairt Broch
10 posts
Dun Flashader Broch
3 posts
Dun Flodigarry Broch
5 posts
Dun Garafad Broch (Destroyed)
8 posts
Dun Garsin, Bracadale Broch
11 posts
Dun Gearymore Broch
1 post
Dun Geilbt Stone Fort / Dun
13 posts
Dun Gerashader Stone Fort / Dun
6 posts
Dun Goirid Stone Fort / Dun
18 posts
Dun Grianan Broch
7 posts
Dun Grianan (Tote) Stone Fort / Dun
15 posts
Dun Grugaig Stone Fort / Dun
20 posts
Dun Hallin Broch
5 posts
Dun Hollan Stone Fort / Dun
6 posts
Dun Kearstach Stone Fort / Dun
3 posts
Dun Kingsburgh (North) Broch
4 posts
Dun Kingsburgh (South) Broch
5 posts
Dun Knock Hillfort
11 posts
Dun Kraiknish Stone Fort / Dun
5 posts
Dun Liath (Glasnakille) Broch
15 posts
Dun Liath, Kilmuir Stone Fort / Dun
3 posts
Dun Maraig Stone Fort / Dun
17 posts
Dun Merkadale Stone Fort / Dun
2 posts
Dun Mor Stone Fort / Dun
7 posts
Dun Mor, Struanmore Stone Fort / Dun
11 posts
Dun na h'Airde Stone Fort / Dun
6 posts
Dun Neill Promontory Fort
13 posts
Dun Osdale Broch
4 posts
Dun Peinduin Stone Fort / Dun
10 posts
Dun Raisaburgh Broch
15 posts
Dun Ringill Stone Fort / Dun
9 posts
Dun Santavaig Stone Fort / Dun
5 posts
Dun Sgalair Stone Fort / Dun
16 posts
Dun Skudiburgh Stone Fort / Dun
19 posts
Dun Sleadale (Talisker) Broch
4 posts
Dun Smail Stone Fort / Dun
15 posts
Dun Suladale Broch
14 posts
Dun Taimh Hillfort
6 posts
Dun Tom na h-Uraich Stone Fort / Dun
2 posts
Dun Torvaig Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
6 posts
Dun Totaig Stone Fort / Dun
6 posts
Dun Treaslane Stone Fort / Dun
1 post
Dun Vallerain Hillfort
4 posts
Dun View Stone Fort / Dun
7 posts
Dun Vlargveg Stone Fort / Dun
1 post
Eilean Ruaridh Hillfort
16 posts
Eyre Standing Stones
6 posts
Eyre Manse Cairn(s)
5 posts
Glen Heysdal Broch
14 posts
Healabhal Mhor Round Cairn
3 posts
High Pasture Cave Cave / Rock Shelter
1 post
Kilbride Stone Circle
8 posts
Kilchriosd Stone Circle
5 posts
Kilmarie Stone Circle
1 post
Kilmore Christianised Site
12 posts
Kilvaxter Souterrain
1 post
Knock Ullinish Souterrain
13 posts
Liveras Chambered Tomb
1 post
Lon Beatha Cairn(s)
9 posts
The Maidens Natural Rock Feature
37 posts
Na Clachan Bhreige Stone Circle
15 posts
Old Man of Storr Natural Rock Feature
1 post
Port na Faganaich Natural Rock Feature
1 post
The Raven's Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
River Sligachan Stone Circle
1 post
Rocabarra Standing Stone / Menhir
11 posts
Rubh an Dunain Chambered Cairn
1 post
Rudha nan Clach Standing Stones
3 posts
Tote (Skeabost) Chambered Cairn
5 posts
Tot Nan Druidhean Cairn(s)
1 post
Trumpan Cairn(s)
1 post
Uig Cairn(s)
26 posts
Vatten Cairn(s)
Sites of disputed antiquity:
2 posts
Heaven Stone Holed Stone
1 post
Teampuill Chaon Christianised Site

News

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Mesolithic hazel nut shells found


http://archaeology... continues...
tjj Posted by tjj
25th October 2015ce
Edited 25th October 2015ce

Skye Cave Find Western Europe's 'earliest string instrument'

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-17537147
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
29th March 2012ce

Burial site find delays new Skye medical centre

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-14509160
strathspey Posted by strathspey
12th August 2011ce
Edited 14th August 2011ce

Prehistoric cave on Skye "Still occupied"


A cave thought to have been occupied by people as early as 3BC was still being lived in this year, it has emerged.

A new hearth for a fire and stacks of wood cut for kindling were found in the L-shaped fissure at Leitir Fura, Kinloch, on Skye... continues...
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
24th August 2010ce
Edited 24th August 2010ce

Seventh Grave Discovered At Skye Bronze Age Site

The latest find is thought to be even older than the six burials previously found.

First published 23/12/09.

More on:

http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/1536528
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
23rd December 2009ce

Tide turns on Iron Age midden treasure trove


AN ANCIENT rubbish tip – inhabited nearly 2,000 years ago – is disappearing into the sea, archeologists have warned.

The Iron Age midden on Skye's west coast has so far yielded bone fragments, stone tools, a button manufactured from horn and the top of a human skull... continues...
moss Posted by moss
11th December 2009ce
Edited 11th December 2009ce

Prehistoric burial ground found on Skye

http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/1467854?UserKey=
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
4th November 2009ce

Rare Iron Age Burial Found on Skye


Archaeologists believe they have uncovered the first Iron Age burial on the Isle of Skye.

The skeleton from about the 1st millennium BC is thought to be that of a young female. It was found recently in an open stone-lined grave as the archaeologists worked to re-open the blocked entrance to the High Pasture Cave... continues...
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
8th September 2005ce
Edited 8th September 2005ce

Images (click to view fullsize)

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<b>Isle of Skye</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Isle of Skye</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Isle of Skye</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Isle of Skye</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Isle of Skye</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Folklore

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I heard some folklore today, unprompted, and I hope the person who told it won't mind me retelling it here. He said that when his father was young (this might be about 60 or more years ago) he lived on Skye for a while, and he'd gone on a long walk over the Cuilleans, accompanying a local man. It took them five hours to get across the mountains and his father then assumed they'd walk the flat way back, along the road. But he was very surprised when his guide said 'well goodbye then' and made to set off the way they'd come. It transpired that the short route home went past a green mound (where, my narrator said, there were, as we would say, fairies, but it was a bronze age burial mound) - and the guide was under no circumstances about to walk past it now that the dusk was falling. He would rather take the five hours back over the mountains in the dark. Which, according to the tale, he did. Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th November 2010ce
Edited 18th November 2010ce

The pattern of distribution of monuments near the Red Cuchuillin mountains is very striking, when viewed on the map, for their locations draw a curve around the southern and eastern sides, the monuments roughly equally spaced and delineating the edge of the mountains perfectly. The Red Cuchuillins, then, seem to be of central significant in the positioning of these sites. They are the easternmost part of the Cuchuillin range, the creation of which is described in folklore thus:

"When all the world was new, there was a great heather-clad plain between Loch Bracadale on the west and the Red Hills on the east. It was a dark and lonely place and the Cailleach Bhur (= Hag of the Ridges, i.e. Winter), whose home was on Ben Wyvis, often lived there when she came west to boil up her linen in her washing pot, dangerous Corryvreckan. She was a very powerful and fearsome person who had made Scotland by dropping into the sea a creel of peat and rock which she brought with her from the north. When her clothes had boiled well, she would spread them to bleach on Storr, and while she was in Skye no good weather was to be got at all. Now spring hated her because she held the maiden he loved prisoner (until the girl should wash a brown fleece white) and he fought with her, but she was strong, stronger than anyone else within the four boundaries of the earth, and he could do nothing. He appealed to the Sun to help him and the Sun flung his spear at Cailleach Bhur as she walked on the moor; it was so fiery and hot it scorched the very earth, and where it struck, a blister, six miles long and six miles wide, grew and grew until it burst and flung forth the Cuchuillins as a glowing, molten mass. For many, many months they glowed and smoked, and the Cailleach Bhur fled away and hid beneath the roots of a holly and dared not return. Even now, her snow is useless against the fire hills.

- Otta F. Swire, Skye: The Island and its Legends, 1961, pp. 20-1.

(for more on the Cailleach Bhur in Skye see also Rudha nan Clach)

The Cuchuillins are also noted, in mythology, for the "school for heroes" run by Skiach, "goddess or mortal no one knows which, but undoubtedly a great warrior. Some say she took her name from a Gaelic name for Skye, others that Skye took its name from her" (see Swire pp. 21-3). The Irish hero Cuchuillin, for whom these mountains are named, heard of Skiach and her school, and with three strides travelled from Ulster to her school. After defeating every one of her students, Skiach finally allowed him to fight with her daughter, whom he also vanquished, after two days. Furious, Skiach descended from her heights to fight Cuchuillin herself. After two days of fighting "on the mountains and on the moors and in the sea" the combat was exactly equally matched, with neither able to gain the upper hand. At this stage Skiach's daughter offers both her mother and Cuchuillin a meal of deer stuffed with roast hazelnuts. Each thinking that "the hazels of knowledge" would teach them how to overcome their opponent, the two of them sit down to eat. From the hazels they learn that they are exactly matched, and that neither will ever win over the other. They therefore make peace, and swear that each will answer the other's call, "though the sky fall and crush us". Skiach named the mountains where they had fought in Cuchuillin's honour.

Swire (Ibid., p. 23) records one further curious piece of folklore with regard to the Cuchuillins:

"In the Cuchuillins, too, though exactly where must not be said, is a cave of gold. Unlike all other treasure caves, there are no barriers here between men and untold wealth. No magic word is required. No fearful monster guards the entrance. He who finds the cave may take as much gold as he needs and return as often as he desires more, but each time he enters the cave, and each time he uses the gold, he will become a little more evil and a little more evil, until he loses his soul. That is the price."
TomBo Posted by TomBo
30th June 2004ce
Edited 22nd March 2011ce

Miscellaneous

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"Many people believe that it is from her wings* and her Gaelic name, Eilean Sgiathanach (Winged Isle), that the name Skye comes. Ptolemy of Alexandria (A.D. 200) refers to the island as Sketis, while the ancient Celtic name 'Skeitos' has become Sgiath in modern Gaelic. Adamnan knew it as Scia. This 'wing derivation certainly sounds very probable, more probable than the other version which claims that 'Skye' is Scandinavian, derived from a norse word Ski (cloud). This school of thought takes its stand on the fact that cloud or mist is what would first and most forcibly attract the notice of any stranger visiting the isle**, whereas to notice the 'wings' requires a map. Obviously this school has never tried (as the early Scandinavian settlers most certainly did) to sail around the despised wings. Of course, many place-names in Skye undoubtedly are Scandinavian, but they date from a later time than Ptolemy - four or five centuries later. A third suggestion, once seriously put forward by certain Celtic antiquaries, was that in Skye stood the temple, known to Greek fable, of Apollo among the Hyperboreans, and that the Gaelic name of the island refers to the wings of the Greek god! The name may, in fact, belong to some old forgotten pre-Celtic tongue."

- Otta F. Swire, Skye: The Island and its Legends, 1961, pp. 72-3.

* The "wings" are Skye's various promontories, for example Trotternish, Waternish and Duirnish.

** Skye is also known as Eilean a' Cheò, meaning "The Misty Isle".
TomBo Posted by TomBo
1st July 2004ce
Edited 1st July 2004ce

"Strath appears to have been a great religious centre ever since prehistoric times. The remains of several stone circles are still to be seen there, in close juxtaposition to a number of ancient churches now in ruins. It seems generally agreed that before St. Columba brought Christianity to Skye the pagan religion of the island was that mysterious cult which has come to us only in the form of stone circles (believed to have been places of worship), monoliths (which in Skye seem to have been frequently connected with graves or burial mounds), and sacred wells and woods, the latter usually hazel groves. St. Columba never attempted to destroy the sacred places of paganism nor the firm belief in the virtues of certain harmless practices he found: instead he blessed them and gave them Christian symbolism, as in the story of St. Turog and the wells at Flodigarry. This is very clearly illustrated in Strath, where five old churches or chapels, now in ruins, stand each beside or near a stone circle, and the graveyards all contain some prehistoric stones as well as having tradition that they were first pagan burial-grounds and later Christian."

- Otta F. Swire, Skye: The Island and its Legends, 1961, pp. 217-8.
TomBo Posted by TomBo
30th June 2004ce
Edited 22nd March 2011ce

Latest posts for Isle of Skye

Showing 1-10 of 1,114 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Dun Ardtreck (Broch) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Dun Ardtreck</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
4th September 2016ce

Dun Gerashader (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

Visited: August 22, 2016

To visit Dùn Gerashader take the A855 north out of Portree for just over a kilometre and park your vehicle immediately before the turn off to Torvaig. Do not scale the barbed wire fence. Walk up to the junction, turn right over the bridge and, 100 metres on, a gate to the right provides access to gentle grassy slopes that lead to the base of the rise bearing the fort. There is a small stream to cross (stepping stones) followed by a steepish rise to Gerashader.

I contoured left on the ascent and was amazed when I reached the southern defences of the fort: three rows of simply huge blocks, described by Canmore as 'the remains of 3 lines of obstructions', arranged like rows of dentures, each one about a metre wide and 1½ metres or more in height. The mind boggles to understand how, two millennia ago, men could locate such stones and move them uphill into place. Above these is the tumbled southern wall, some four metres broad.

Beyond this rocky rampart is the relatively level grassy interior, dotted with stones that have probably tumbled from the much higher wall on the north rim of the hill, and beyond that, on a rise, the wide northern wall of the fort. Though much tumbled, stretches of the original masonry courses are still evident.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
29th August 2016ce
Edited 3rd September 2016ce

Dun Gerashader (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Dun Gerashader</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Gerashader</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Gerashader</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Gerashader</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Gerashader</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Gerashader</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Gerashader</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Gerashader</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
29th August 2016ce
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