The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Cheddar Gorge and Gough's Cave (Cave / Rock Shelter)

Prehistoric Britons ate their dead and carved mysterious markings on their bones


Cheddar Gorge in Somerset’s Mendip Hills is one of Britain’s most beautiful natural wonders, with its sweeping limestone cliffs, and striking natural rock chambers.

But new evidence suggests the picturesque site had a deeply sinister past.

Paleontologists have discovered that around 15,000 years ago, British cave dwellers filleted and ate their dead relatives before inscribing markings on their bones in grisly prehistoric rituals.

It is the first time that such practices have been found in the Paleolithic, or Old Stone Age - which dates from 2.6 million years ago to around 12,000BC - anywhere in the world.




http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/08/09/ancient-britons-ate-dead-carved-mysterious-markings-bones/
moss Posted by moss
14th August 2017ce

County Kerry

Danny Healy-Rae and the Little People: Fairies to blame for problems on bad road, says TD


It was a puzzling case of Danny Healy-Rae and the 'little people'.
The Kerry TD is blaming poor road conditions around Killarney on fairies, according to his daughter.

Mr Healy-Rae believes that mythical creatures are at work on the main route between Killarney and Cork and that they are responsible for the appalling condition of the road.

More
http://m.independent.ie/irish-news/danny-healyrae-and-the-little-people-fairies-to-blame-for-problems-on-bad-road-says-td-36009894.html
ryaner Posted by ryaner
12th August 2017ce

Highland (Mainland)

Year-long festival to celebrate Iron Age brochs


A new year-long archaeology festival aims to uncover new information about Iron Age brochs and also encourage greater public awareness of them.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-40866021
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th August 2017ce

Hendraburnick Quoit (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

Is stone most decorated in Southern Britain?


NEW archaeological evidence has suggested that an ancient stone monument near Davidstow was used for moonlit rituals during the Bronze Age, and could top Stonehenge for being the ‘most decorated stone in southern Britain’.

The Cornwall Archaeological Society has found new evidence, suggesting that the Hendraburnick ‘Quoit’, situated near Davidstow, was used for moonlit rituals or ceremonies during the late Neolithic and bronze age period.

The work conducted on Hendraburnick Quoit, was funded and carried out by the Cornwall Archaeological Society and led by Dr Andy Jones, an archaeologist from the Cornwall Archaeological Unit, and Penzance-based Tom Goskar, an archaeologist with a specialism of using digital technologies to find new evidence within artefacts from the past.
Speaking about the new evidence, Dr Jones told the Post: “We’re really pleased. It’s something we’ve known about for quite a long time, but it’s really, really good — a remarkable find.
“It (the Hendraburnick Quoit markings) is a unique find. There are lots of decorated monuments in the UK, but for southern Britain, it’s very remarkable.”

And so forth...

http://www.camelford-today.co.uk/article.cfm?id=108583&headline=Is%20stone%20most%20decorated%20in%20southern%20Britain?§ionIs=news&searchyear=2017
moss Posted by moss
7th August 2017ce

Switzerland (Country)

Bronze Age lunchbox emerges from the ice


From the New Yorker:
http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/an-ancient-lunchbox-emerges-from-the-ice
UncleRob Posted by UncleRob
7th August 2017ce

Orkney

"The IKEA of Neolithic sites"


Skara Brae made Number Nine in The Daily Record's top ten of Trip Advizer scathing reviews of Scottish Tourist Attractions.

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/scotland-now/10-times-tourists-scotland-were-10934794

Lovely.
Howburn Digger Posted by Howburn Digger
6th August 2017ce

Rousay

Orkney archaeological dig is a battle between time and tide.


AN archaeological investigation of an eroding mound on the island of Rousay in Orkney dig is revealing extensive settlement.

But there is a battle against time to find the whole truth hidden under the ground at Swandro as the sea continues to eat away at the land.

The dig is being led by the University of a Bradford and Orkney College UHI, and the ancient settlement was discovered by Dr Julie Bond in 2010.

She had spotted a few odd stones only just visible among the pebbles. Since then, the excavation has been changing the understanding of this site.

The tops of stones partly buried by the boulder beach turned out to be set uprights forming part of a prehistoric building around the high tide mark.

Although the tops of the stones are worn and battered by the sea, the beach has partly protected the deposits. Animal bone and pottery were recovered, finds suggesting an Iron Age context.

continued...

http://www.scotsman.com/regions/inverness-highlands-islands/orkney-archaeological-dig-is-a-battle-between-time-and-tide-1-4514267
moss Posted by moss
31st July 2017ce

Spain (Country)

Elba, the 9,300-year old Spanish cowherd who was lactose intolerant


https://elpais.com/elpais/2017/05/12/inenglish/1494584904_820305.html

"Death caught up with Elba on a Spanish hillside 9,300 years ago. She is thought to have been following her herd of aurochs, an extinct breed of large cattle, along an ancestral trail that is now a paved road. In fact, it is the same road that Google suggests as the best route between the localities of O Courel and Pedrafita do Cebreiro, in Galicia’s Lugo province, in northwestern Spain.

Her herd was made up of three aurochs: an enormous male with massive horns and two younger specimens. It might have been early spring or early winter, and the ground was covered by a blanket of snow thin enough to make for easy walking, yet thick enough to conceal some of the geographical features lying beneath.

As a result, she did not see the hole that had opened up in the earth. All four of them fell into the gap created by the collapse of the roof of a cave known today as Cova do Uro, or Aurochs’ Cave in the regional Galician language .... "
tjj Posted by tjj
27th July 2017ce

Moray

Archaeologists discover Pictish remains at Moray fort


New Pictish remains have been discovered at a fort thought to have been largely destroyed by a 19th-century development.

Archaeologists from the University of Aberdeen uncovered a longhouse and an 1,100-year-old anglo Saxon coin in a dig at Burghead Fort near Lossiemouth, Moray.

Experts believe the fort was a significant seat of power within the Pictish Kingdom, dating between 500 CE and 1000 CE.


Read the STV News Report.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
25th July 2017ce

Ness of Brodgar (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork)

Orkney archaeologists excited by incense pot discovery


Archaeologists say they have unearthed the remains of a so-called incense pot at the Ness of Brodgar in Orkney.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-40681085
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd July 2017ce
Showing 1-10 of 2,421 news posts. Most recent first | Next 10