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Cairn F (Passage Grave) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Cairn F</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
23rd September 2017ce

Cairn H (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Cairn H</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
23rd September 2017ce

Cairn G (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Cairn G</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
23rd September 2017ce

Cairn C (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Cairn C</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd September 2017ce

Cairn A2 (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Cairn A2</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd September 2017ce

Cairn J (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Cairn J</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
22nd September 2017ce

Drygarn Fawr (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Drygarn Fawr</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
22nd September 2017ce

Tobar Childa (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Folklore

Macaulay, in his "History of St. Kilda" published in 1764, describes a spring there called by the inhabitants Toberi-Clerich, the cleric in question being, according to him, Columba. "This welI," he says, "is below the village, . . . and gushes out like a torrent from the face of a rock. At every full tide the sea overflows it, but how soon that ebbs away, nothing can be fresher or sweeter than the water. It was natural enough for the St. Kildians to imagine that so extraordinary a phenomenon must have been the effect of some supernatural cause, and one of their teachers would have probably assured them that Columba, the great saint of their island and a mighty worker of miracles, had destroyed the influence which, according to the established laws of nature, the sea should have had on that water," This spring resembles one in the parish of Tain, in Ross-shire, known as St. Mary's Well. The latter is covered several hours each day by the sea, but when the tide retires its fresh, sweet water gushes forth again.

MacAulay The History of St Kilda 1764
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd September 2017ce

Bioda Mor (Stone Fort / Dun) — Links

Canmore


Respect to whoever took these photographs.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd September 2017ce

Bioda Mor (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

The final prehistoric sight and site of this St Kilda visit would be the fort at Bioda Mor. This is a truly spectacular place, rugged cliffs, natural archways and thousands upon thousands of seabirds including, our favourites, the puffins. To make sure nobody would get lost this island is aptly named Dun.

From our vantage point at The Lovers Rock we could see where the fort was situated on the western side. Nearer The Milking stone we could see the fort from the bay/eastern side. It is a truly remarkable site. Earlier I had asked if I could scramble across to Dun but was given a polite but stern answer of no. However it can be arranged, possibly the next visit.

We sailed from the small pier at Hirta, glimpsing the quarries at Clash Na Bearnaich on the way. Nothing can really prepare you for the scenery about to appear. Nothing can stop the feelings of immense respect for the builders as they have literally built on sheer cliff face. Defensive walls can clearly be seen built various places. Nearer the centre of the island this wall is over 2m wide and 1.5m high. Fallen walls can be seen clinging to the cliffs on the bay side way above us and the sea.

This was stunning enough but even more stunning are the views around Stacc Lee, Stacc An Armin and the island of Boreray, another place I need to find a way onto. Each of them nave their sad and inspiring stories to tell. Then we set sail to the east on the amazingly calm Atlantic Ocean back to Leverburgh. As we neared the ferry port the standing stones at Borvemore, Nisabost and on the island of Ensay could just about be seen, Ensay being clearly visible. Had the ancient peoples built a type of light house? I don't know but they certainly told us that land and safety was near.

Viewed 2/9/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd September 2017ce

Clash Na Bearnaich (Ancient Mine / Quarry) — Links

Canmore


More pictures of a truly stunning site.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd September 2017ce

Clash Na Bearnaich (Ancient Mine / Quarry) — Fieldnotes

One of the main places I wanted to visit on St Kilda was the quarry at Clash Na Bearnaich aka The Chimney. Sadly we'd ran out of time but not out of scenery. The extremely knowledgeable crew pointed out the quarries as we sailed towards the fort at Bioda Mor.

As the photos show the quarry faces are quite high up the face of the hill. Walking due south of The Milking will be the route I'll take to get a closer look during our next visit. On the way I'll be able to look at the quarry at Gearraidh Ard. It all points to there being a sizeable pre Iron Age population.

Viewed 2/9/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd September 2017ce

Tobar Childa (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Fieldnotes

After the life changing events at the Lover's Stone it was time to make our way via the wall/path to the tarred road. It was either head further uphill heading north east or head downhill and east towards the village, not Hirta but the Iron Age hut circles of Tobar Childa. We headed towards Tobar Childa as time was running out as we needed to be back at the pier.

So downhill we headed which enabled us to see the absolutely stunning views again. The weather had started to get even warmer, unbelievable considering the tales of bad weather we'd been told about. Just to the south of the Abhainn Mhor burn we headed straight east to the hut circles. These are hard to find because of the sheer amount of gray rock lying about, they certainly had no shortage of building material. I remained to look for the ancient village whilst A headed to the pier.

NF09959955

This appeared to be a group of 4 hut circles the best of which I photographed. The hut had large stones surrounding its edge and is about 4m in diameter. Harsh place to live during winter possibly, however a lot of people told us that the climate wasn't so remote and the islands weren't so isolated as they were to become.

NF10039958

This group seemed to have the best built hut circle making use of a depression, perhaps man made, on which to build their wall. Almost all the hut circles in these groups are about 4m in diameter and this was no exception.

NF10099948

This was to be last stop on mainland St Kilda as A was shouting (probably louder than that) from the Main Street that people were assembling at the pier. NF10099948 had the largest of the surrounding walls. These were almost 1.5m wide and almost 0.75 tall.

Sadly two hut circle groups missed but I'll visit them the next time we're here. With that it was a mad dash through various cleits, enclosures, houses (ancient and more modern) and walls to the eastern end of Main Street.

Visited 2/9/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd September 2017ce

North Ayrshire (incl. Arran) — News

Remains of 6,000-year-old dwelling found in Ayrshire


The remains of a 6,000-year-old dwelling have been uncovered during water mains work in Ayrshire.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-41347487
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd September 2017ce

Bwlch-y-Ddau-Faen (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Bwlch-y-Ddau-Faen</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bwlch-y-Ddau-Faen</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bwlch-y-Ddau-Faen</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bwlch-y-Ddau-Faen</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bwlch-y-Ddau-Faen</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bwlch-y-Ddau-Faen</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bwlch-y-Ddau-Faen</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bwlch-y-Ddau-Faen</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bwlch-y-Ddau-Faen</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bwlch-y-Ddau-Faen</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
21st September 2017ce

Clachtoll (Broch) — News

Iron Age ruins in Assynt recreated in 3D


A 3D model has been created of the ruins of an Iron Age home in the Highlands.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-41347333
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
21st September 2017ce

Orkney — News

Neolithic Orkney rivalries detailed in new study


Rivalries in Orkney more than 4,500 years ago led to competition between communities including over how people were buried, according to new research.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-41319168
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th September 2017ce

Y Garn (Pumlumon) (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Y Garn (Pumlumon)</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
19th September 2017ce

Pegwn Bach (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Pegwn Bach</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
19th September 2017ce

Crugyn-Llwyd (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
19th September 2017ce

Thornborough Henge South — Images

<b>Thornborough Henge South</b>Posted by harestonesdown harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
19th September 2017ce

Thornborough Henge North — Images

<b>Thornborough Henge North</b>Posted by harestonesdown<b>Thornborough Henge North</b>Posted by harestonesdown harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
19th September 2017ce

Crugyn-Llwyd (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
19th September 2017ce

The Thornborough Henges — Fieldnotes

Just spent three nights here for the Mabon celebrations. Rituals aren't really my thing but camping besides an henge with two others in close proximity definitely is.

I'm not sure what the situation has been in the past but at the moment you cant walk the direct route between all three henges, the way from the central henge to the north henge is private property, the field contains an house, big disappointment. On a more positive note you can easily walk from the central henge to the southern one, though you do have to cross a small lane.

If you want to visit the northern henge (you really should, it's easily the best imo) then it's quite straight forward.
From within the central henge leave by the gate facing the southern entrance, as if you we're heading for the southern henge but turn right and walk along the lane a short while, 300 metres-ish and take the first possible right (on foot) up a narrow path that's rather overgrown (atm) with sloe berries, stay on it till you meet the road. Cross the road and follow the other lane till you are almost at the point where it dog legs, dip through the hedge here (on your right) and you're in the northern henge.
It's well worth the effort. ;)
harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
19th September 2017ce

Domen-ddu (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
19th September 2017ce

Bryn Rhosau (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Bryn Rhosau</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bryn Rhosau</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
19th September 2017ce
Showing 1-50 of 125,609 posts. Most recent first | Next 50