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White Cairn, Culroy (Cairn(s)) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>White Cairn, Culroy</b>Posted by markj99<b>White Cairn, Culroy</b>Posted by markj99<b>White Cairn, Culroy</b>Posted by markj99 Posted by markj99
18th October 2018ce

White Cairn, Culroy (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 14.10.18
I expected to see a gleaming white cairn from a distance. The reality was somewhat different. I found the cairn more by GPS than sight.
The cairn is constructed of white stones however it is hidden under vegetation and the centre has been robbed out. A horseshoe wall structure is all that remains.
Canmore ID 62210 records that on the 1911 visit the cairn was being « broken up for road metal ».
Posted by markj99
18th October 2018ce

Bennachie — Images

<b>Bennachie</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
18th October 2018ce

Proleek (Portal Tomb) — Folklore

Proleek is suituated about four miles from Dundalk. To reach the big stone you have to travel over some fields before you arrive at the spot. There are three massive horizontal stones in shape on which the big stone rests which weighs a few tons. Not far away from the stone is the giant's grave.
The people of the district tell us, that if you can place three stones without falling on top of the big stone you will be married inside a year. Old people warn us to clear out of the place before 6'oclock or wee people will carry you away for ever.
It is said to be a great meeting place of the fairies. The old people tell us that they have often seen the small red man.
Collected from Betty Bowden of Drogheda, in the 1930s. Now digitised at Dúchas.ie.
Another informant says:
This is an outstanding monument in the district. In consists of three upright stones about eight feet in height supporting an enormous boulder of about 50 tons. It is locally called the giant's load and it is said the giant who put it up got his death of drinking of waters from the river these being poisoned by an enemy. Others say it is a monument over some mighty chieftain of old, but in truth little is known about its origin.

Giant's grave.
About 100 yards from the cromlech is an enclosure in the shape of a grave. It is locally called the "giant's grave" meaning of course that the giant who met his death as the result of the poisoned waters lies in it.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
17th October 2018ce

Moylisha (Portal Tomb) — Folklore

The name of the monument is variously given as Lob-in-a-sigh, Leaba an Sidh; on the Ordnance Survey map it is recorded as Labbanasigha. O'Donovan says the monument was called "Leaba na Saighe (Lectus canis venatica) where it is supposed a famous huntsman of old interred a favourite greyhound bitch." Perhaps it is not unreasonable to suggest in the light of the discovery of the javelin mould that the name may have some connection with the Irish word saighead (spearhead).
When the cairn was excavated, there were found two halves of a sandstone mould for a loop-socketed spear head, in the base of the cairn at the east end of the main chamber.

In 'The Moylisha Megalith, Co. Wicklow' by Gearóid Ó h-Iceadha, p119-128 in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Vol. 76, No. 3 (Oct., 1946).

There are many sites in Wales with 'Filiast' in their name: also meaning 'Greyhound Bitch'. I think Leaba an Sidh would mean the bed of the fairies?
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
17th October 2018ce

Moyad (Court Tomb) — Images

<b>Moyad</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Moyad</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Moyad</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Moyad</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Moyad</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
16th October 2018ce

Calverley Woods (Natural Rock Feature) — Folklore

Calverley Woods at one time had a wishing well, of the ebbing and flowing type, and more than a local reputation for the quality of its water.

Also in the woods was a rocking stone. This was a huge block of stone which at the slightest touch rocked.

On wild, dark nights it was said that a headless horse rider could be seen. The rider was supposed to be Sir Walter de Calverley, who murdered his two sons, Walter and William, but the locals added: "It had to be very dark," or you could not see him, he rode so fast.
Shipley Times and Express, 26th May, 1943.

I'm thinking the rocking stone could be the same thing as the Hanging Stone? There's a picture of this at the Leodis photographic archive. It certainly looks precarious.

All in all it sounds a strange spot, and not entirely encroached upon by the quarrying and industry that was once there, an exploding fireworks factory and the gardens of big houses that are very close by.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th October 2018ce

Calverley Woods (Natural Rock Feature) — Links

The Northern Antiquarian


Details of the cup-marked rocks lurking in these woods.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th October 2018ce

Sharpitor Nutcrackers (Rocking Stone) — Folklore

"Have you any pixies in this neighbourhood?"
A rustic, who hesitated at first, shook his head, and said he "didn' think any ov 'em was left now," induced a woman standing by to say, "Ees there was;" and she pointed to a high ground covered with granite boulders (the scene was at Lustleigh), and said "You may go and zee the pixy holes for yourself up there. They comes there be night, and people goes to zee 'em; but they don't come out by day."
"Did you ever go? did you ever see them?"
She did not like to go there by night, but she had herself seen the "pixy holes," and she "knaw'd that volks did go there, and did zee 'em in the moonlight."
One of the company asked what they could find to eat in that wild place? and the answer was, "Perhaps 'twas mushrooms."
"Oh," said one of the listeners, "then they did not get any thing to eat for more than six weeks of the whole year," when a rustic wit responded, "Perhaps they larn'd how to pickle 'em."
Rustics and their quaint spelling. From "Devonian folk-lore illustrated", by John Bowring. In Reports and Transactions of the Devonshire Association vol. 2, 1867-68.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th October 2018ce

Sharpitor Nutcrackers (Rocking Stone) — Links

Legendary Dartmoor


The familiar annoying tale of a perfectly good logan stone being messed with. The Coast Artillery School turned up to put things right and somehow allowed it to topple down the hill. But there's some confusion - perhaps that was an adjacent stone and the Nutcrackers still survives?
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th October 2018ce

Upper Cragabus (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

The Upper Cragabus cairn is to be found on top of a small hill on the south side of Oa road. Walking west from Lower Cragabus we headed for the sharp corner at the bottom of the Upper Cragabus brae, just before the Cragabus Burn.

Head uphill and south east into the field, this will lead straight to the cairn.

The cairn is located next to fence next to the Gleann an Dobhrain wood. Sadly the cairn has taken a severe battering with two large houks. Anything that could be used was taken from the cairn which despite everything remains at 8m wide and 1m tall.

A case of 'what if' but still a very worthwhile visit as it has great views down the Oa valley to the east and north to another cairn, our next stop.

Let the fun begin!!

Visited 29/7/2018.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
16th October 2018ce

Barr An T-Seann Duine (Promontory Fort) — Images

<b>Barr An T-Seann Duine</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Barr An T-Seann Duine</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Barr An T-Seann Duine</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Barr An T-Seann Duine</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Barr An T-Seann Duine</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
16th October 2018ce

The Ard (Promontory Fort) — Images

<b>The Ard</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Ard</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Ard</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Ard</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Ard</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
16th October 2018ce

Hatten 2 (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Hatten 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 2</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 2</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
15th October 2018ce

Cragabus (Chambered Tomb) — Fieldnotes

The previous day had seen the drive to Oban and the ferry to Port Askaig, Islay. When we arrived it was pitch dark, the ferry was an hour late and it was a pea soupper mist for the drive to Port Ellen. The twisty minor road along heading west towards The Oa memorial provided a test as we headed towards Upper Cragabus, our base camp.

We could have driven through Glasgow and never noticed as the mist was almost zero visibility, it also meant that we had driven past the chamber cairn at Lower Cragabus.

Fortunately the next morning provided clearer weather in what would prove an adventuresome morning. From Upper Cragabus head back east towards Port Ellen. Go past Middle Cragabus and the remaining standing stone can be next to the road on top of a mound near to Lower Cragabus.

The standing stone and the chamber cairn sit on top of the rocky crag called Creag Mhor. Damage to the site can be clearly seen, cairn material has been removed, quarrying has happened and as usual robbing had been evident.

Fortunately there is stone still standing and a lovely stone it is, almost 2m in height. The shape of the chamber can be clearly seen with several slabs still standing in the chambers three sections, the chamber being almost 5m in length. Despite the robbing several finds of bones, flints and pottery shards were found.

The stone would wave us goodbye in the morning and say hello on the way back to Upper Cragabus, or if I left early in the morning to visit 'difficult' sites it would get a good laugh at the various states I'd come back in.

Great start, well worth a visit :-)

Visited 29/7/2018.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th October 2018ce

Hatten 1 — Fieldnotes

Only six scattered stones are all that remains from this megalithic tomb. It lies in the southwest of the village Sandhatten. If you drive from Huntlosen to Sandhatten turn left into the road Haferkampstraße and continue for about 150m, the tomb lies northeast of the road on a private field. According to Sprockhoff, the tomb was originally about 12m long.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
15th October 2018ce

Knocklearoch (Standing Stones) — Folklore

Knocklearoch, in Islay, stands for Cnoc-Cleireach - i.e., the Hill of the Clerics. The following tradition regarding the locality, as told by Mr Hector MacLean of Ballygrant, Islay, is cited by Captain Thomas: "There is a tradition that two clerics were hanged, and that the day on which they were hanged was remarkably stormy. So it has been a byword in Islay ever since I remember, when a cold and stormy day came on, 'This day is worse than the day on which the clerics were hanged.' At Knocklearoch are two monoliths called Na Cleirich, 'The Clerics,' and under these, tradition relates, the two clerics were buried. (PSAS vol. xvi, p267).
From The influence of the pre-reformation church on Scottish place-names, 1904, by J.M. Mackinlay.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
15th October 2018ce

The Ard (Promontory Fort) — Images

<b>The Ard</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Ard</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Ard</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Ard</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Ard</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th October 2018ce

Hatten 1 — Images

<b>Hatten 1</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 1</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 1</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 1</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hatten 1</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
15th October 2018ce

Huntlosen 1 — Fieldnotes

Despite the fact the this megalithic tomb is signed from the road "Zum Döhler Wehe", a visit is only recommended for the really enthusiastic (but I think there are some here on this website ;-) ) as the tomb is heavily destroyed and overgrown. You'll find the tomb if you drive from Huntlosen on the K337 westward to Hengstlage. About 2.5km behind Huntlosen turn left into "Zum Döhler Wehe" drive for another 725m and park at N52° 59' 01.8" E8° 14' 30.3". There is a track which leads roughly soutwest around a field, after 100m the track turn westwards and after additional 380m a tracks leads north into the wood (there is also a sign for the tomb). After 90m into the wood, the tomb lies to the right.

As I said, the tomb is heavily destroyed, only some of the supporting stones and a end stone survived, none of the capstones. Also the heavy vegetation prevents a clearer view of the site. According to the information baord the original size was about 14 x 2m. There are some grave mounds in this area as well.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
15th October 2018ce
Showing 1-50 of 131,833 posts. Most recent first | Next 50