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Pass of Kilbride (Round Barrow(s)) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Pass of Kilbride</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Pass of Kilbride</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Pass of Kilbride</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Pass of Kilbride</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
20th February 2017ce

Long Bredy (Bank Barrow) — Images

<b>Long Bredy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Long Bredy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Long Bredy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Long Bredy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Long Bredy</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
19th February 2017ce

Pass of Kilbride (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

From archaeology.ie:

Class: Barrow - unclassified
Townland: PASS OF KILBRIDE
Scheduled for inclusion in the next revision of the RMP: Yes
Description: On a prominent hillock with good views to the N, E and S. Possible ringfort (WM034-005----) 350m to SE. A small roughly circular flat-topped, mound (diam. 5.2m N-S; 6.3m E-W; H c. 1.3m) defined by a scarp with slight narrow fosse (Wth 1.6m; D 0.2m) around the base of the mound best preserved from W-N-E, not visible at S. Traces of a very slight depression visible on the centre of the mound.

Monument surveyed in 2015 and described by McGuinness (2015, 60-3) as following: ‘Monument comprises a roughly square-shaped mound with rounded corners (8.5m NNW-SSE x 9.2m WSW-ENE), flat top (5m N-S x 5.2m E-W) and steeply sloping sides, delimited by a shallow ditch formed of four straight lines (Overall dims. 11.5m NNW-SSE x 13m ENE-WSW), the corners sunken deeper than the channels connecting them as if the ends overlapped; possibly these represent pits or hollows left by decayed timber posts. Mound is oriented ENE-WSW (NE-SW), being higher and more massive at SW end; ditch is slightly trapezoidal in shape, the SW end measuring 11.9m in length while the NE end measures only 10.4m. Where highest at SW, mound rises 1.26m above ditch. Ditch appears to be best preserved on W side, where a thorn tree growing from side of mound arches over it; here it is up to 0.16m below external ground level. Ditch at E side appears at least as deep but is densely overgrown and inaccessible; ditch is very poorly preserved on S side. Ditch ranges in width from 1.6m at well-preserved W side up to 1.8m at N side. Immediately Beyond ditch on W side is what appears to be a low external bank—as this is by no means certain, maximum dimensions for the monument given above are derived from the ditch This barrow, marked ‘Moateen’ on OS 6” map, is strikingly positioned on flat summit of S end of low but very prominent glacial hillock with long axis running N-S, just N of the N6; and, but for vegetation, there would be good views in all directions. A raised bog visible only a short distance to N has been harvested for peat on an industrial scale, as have other raised bogs to S. This hillock is at N edge of the pass or strip of dry land that gives the townland its name—less than 1km across at this point—which runs E-W between areas of bog that have been an impediment to movement since prehistoric times: a remarkable cluster of ancient trackways has been discovered in the bogs to the S, the nearest cluster being c. 1km to SSE (WM034-009----/010---/01-2----/014----/015----), including one (WM034-014----) that has been radiocarbondated to 1390-1046 cal. BC, placing it around the junction of Middle and Late Bronze Age. The ASI document a possible ringfort (WM034-005----) about 350m to SE. Although not yet examined by the survey-team, a ‘motte’ (WM034-003----) lying immediately S of the N6 c. 700m to WSW of the present site could, from the ASI account given on the NMS website, be interpreted as a bowl-barrow, perhaps with stepped or otherwise shaped summit like those at Slane More and elsewhere in Ireland (McGuinness 2012, 12-13): Steep-sided mound (H 2m), there is a low rise on the centre of the summit, the significance of which is unclear. At the base of the motte from NE-E-S-W to WNW there is a wide shallow fosse. No visible trace of a bailey…. Traces of linear earthworks in field to the SW are visible on Bing Maps…. [and] could be the remains of a medieval road associated with the motte. [NMS website]. Monument lies between two ruined medieval parish churches on sites which Leo Swan (1988, 13, 21) attributed to the early medieval period: Pass of Kilbride, with St Bridget’s Well (WM034-001----/002----), only c. 700m to W but not certainly of early medieval date; and Clonfad, 2.5km to ENE, with a ruined medieval church, standing stone, early medieval high cross (Crawford 1927, 1-2) and a burial ground, including ‘the bishop’s grave’, surrounded by sub-circular earthworks representing the enclosing monastic vallum (WM027-066----/067----). The unusual rectilinear earthwork described here is not obviously a barrow, and indeed, as one ASI fieldworker observed on 8/6/71, ‘It does not appear to belong to any of the known classes of antiquity in Ireland’ [SMR file]. Nonetheless, it is a flat-topped mound surrounded by a ditch, which—angularity of plan aside—are features found in other Westmeath barrows; it is very strikingly located on a glacial hillock with excellent visibility, a type of location common for barrows in this and other counties; and the recognition of a second, prominently sited rectilinear barrow (WM027-027----) only c. 8km to NE seems to suggest that it is indeed a barrow, albeit of a hitherto unknown type in Ireland'.

Compiled by: Caimin O'Brien based on details provided by David McGuinness.

Date of upload: 10 February 2016
ryaner Posted by ryaner
19th February 2017ce

Drummy Wood (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Drummy Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Drummy Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Drummy Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Drummy Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
19th February 2017ce

The Rollright Stones (Stone Circle) — Folklore

I don't understand how the traditional rhyme isn't already written here. So I don't apologise for the length of the following:
[...] Folklore and science, romance and archaeology, the unlearned and the learned, have all contributed answers [to the meaning of the stones]. From the folklore of the neighbourhood we have gleaned the story of the stones which has undoubtedly proved the most popular, and which will probably be attached to them as long as they stand. Indeed it is probable that if we searched the whole of England we should not find a site in which the folklore is a more living thing.

The story is well-enough known, but here it is:--
A certain King set out to conquer all England and had arrived at the head of his forces at the hill on which Rollright stands. He had almost reached its crest when a witch who claimed the ground appeared and stopped him with the words -

Seven long strides shalt thou take and
If Long Compton thou canst see
King of England thou shalt be.

Exulting greatly, thinking his victory assured, the King called out -

Stick, stock, stone,
As King of England I'll be known.

and took the seven long strides, when, lo! there arose before him a mound of earth, which at the completion of the strides prevented him from seeing the village of Long Compton below. The witch then pronounced the doom --

As Long Compton thou canst not see,
King of England thou shalt not be,
Rise up stick, stand still stone,
For King of England thou shalt be none.
Thou and thy men hoar stones shall be,
And I myself an eldern tree.

And so it came about.

[...] The elder is abundant all around the stones and several bushes have been pointed out as that embodying the witch. If you find the right one and cut it her blood oozes out, and the stones are seen to shiver, in an endeavour to come to life, for when the witch's blood is drawn her spell is broken and the King and his army will pursue their triumphant march.

On Midsummer eve, when the elder was in bloom it was formerly the custom for people to come to the King Stone and stand in a circle. Then an elder bush near by was cut and those present have affirmed that the King moved his head. The inhabitants of the district have, however, a dread of breaking the spell, and the writer was told, not so long ago, that those of Long Compton will not burn elder sticks in their grates.

The fairies dance round the King Stone of nights. One Will Hughes, of Long Compton, now gathered to his fathers, had seen them. They were little folk, he said, like little girls to look at. His wife's mother, who had been murdered as a witch, remembered a hole in the bank out of which the fairies came, and she and her playmates had often placed a flat stone over the opening to keep them in, but it had always been turned over before the morning. Folklore and religion blend in the attitude felt towards the spot and Sir Arthur Evans tells of a labourer who always went to the stones on Good Friday, for there he would be on Holy ground.

Away to the south-east on the edge of the large field in which the circle is situated, is a rather jumbled group of five large stones, called the Whispering Knights, which are said to be five treacherous officers who had detached themselves from the King's army and were plotting treason when the spell operated. They have their own particular piece of folklore and at midnight are said to run down the hill to drink at a spring in little Rollright spinney, every night according to some, only at special seasons according to others. At dusk, it is said, you can hear them whispering to each other.

Many of the stories attached to Rollright are to be found in other parts of Europe, and it is evident that we have in them something more than local superstition, but the subject is too great to be discussed here.

Another legend says that the stones become men at midnight, join hands and dance round in a circle and in Cornwall the name "Stone Dance" is attached to such circles as Rollright, the explanation there being that they are dancers turned to stone for dancing on the Sabbath.

[...] Rollright and its kindred circles were to the prehistoric people who erected and used them, places as sacred as our cathedrals and churches are to us to-day. That it should come, as it did yesterday afternoon, under the auctioneer's hammer in a public saleroom, would have filled our ancestors, could they have foreseen and understood such a contingency, with the same kind of horror we should feel if the same auctioneers were to offer Westminster Abbey to the highest bidder.
From an article in the Banbury Guardian, 30th June 1927.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th February 2017ce
Edited 19th February 2017ce

Men Amber (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Men Amber</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th February 2017ce

Trewern (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Trewern</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th February 2017ce

Drift Stones (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Drift Stones</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th February 2017ce

Boswens Croft (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Boswens Croft</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th February 2017ce

The Pipers (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>The Pipers</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th February 2017ce

Men Amber (Natural Rock Feature) — Folklore

To the Editor of the West Briton.

[...] In the year 1851 I was induced to visit Prospidnick village and hill, particularly the latter, by reading in Norden's Speculi Britanniae Pars, &c., 1584, an account, accompanied by an engraving, of a singular mass of rocks that is in the neighbourhood; and, on making inquiries, was informed that Men Amber was still in existence, but not in the same state as when sketched by Norden, whose description is here given verbatim:

"Mayne Amber, certain huge stones so sett and subtillye combined, not by art as I take it, but by nature, as a childe may move, the upper stone beinge of a huge bignes, with one finger, so equallie balanced it is, and the forces of menie strong men enjoyned, can do no more in moving it. It is to be imagined that theis stones were thus lefte at the general floude, when the earth was washed awaye, and the massie stones remayned, as are mightye rockes uncovered, standing upon lofty hills."

The following is from Carew, 1602:- "More certain though less wonderful, and yet for the strangeness well worth the viewing, Mayn Amber is a rock; Amber as some say signyfieth Ambrose, and a great rock the same is, advanced upon some others of a meaner size, with so equal a counterpoise, that the push of a finger will sensibly move it to and fro, but further to remove it the united forces of many shoulders over weak. Wherefore the Cornish wonder-gatherer thus describeth the same:--

"Be those thy mother Nature's work,
Or proof of Giant's might,
Worthless and ragged though thou show,
Yet art thou worth the sight.

This hugy rock one finger's force
Apparently will move,
But to remove it many strengths
Shall all like feeble prove."

Mr. Scawen, whose family had been established for a long time at Molenick, in St. Germans, tells us in his MSS., written in the latter part of the 17th century, when and by whom this logan stone was thrown down. Complaining of the mischief done by strangers, he writes:-

"Here, too, we may add what wrong another sort of strangers has done to us, especially in the civil wars, and in particular by destroying Mineamber, a famous monument, being a rock of infinite weight, which as a burden was laid upon other great stonesn; and yet so equally thereon poised up by Nature only, as a little child could instantly move it, but no one man or many remove it. This natural monument all travellers that came that way desired to behold, but in the time of Oliver's usurpation, when all monumental things became despicable, one Shrubsall, one of Oliver's heroes, then governor of Pendennis, by labour and much ado caused to be undermined and thrown down, to the great grief of the country, but to his own great glory as he thought, doing it, as he said, with a small cane in his hand. I myself have heard him boast of this act, being a prisoner then under him."

There was a tradition or prophecy, current at the time, that Mineamber, so called by Scawen, should stand as long as England had a king; its overthrow by Shrubsall seems to have been for the purpose of showing the loyal Cornish that kings were to reign no longer.

Borlase's account is as follows:-
"In the parish of Sithney stood the famous Logan stone, commonly called Men-amber; it is 11 foot long from east to west, four foot deep, wide six foot; there is no bason on the surface, but on the stone B there is one plain one. This top stone was so nicely poised that, as Mr. Seawen in his MSS. says, &c. There are some marks of the tool upon this stone, the surface, C D, being wrought into a wavy place, as in the Icon; and by its quadrangular shape I should judge it to have been dedicated to Mercury, as by a bason cut in the under stone B, I judge the stone A to be placed on the top of this karn by human art.

However that be, certain it is that the vulgar used to resort to this place at particular times of the year, and pay'd to this stone more respect than was thought becoming good christians, which was the reason that by cleaving off part of the stone B, the top stone A was lay'd along in its present reclined posture and its wonderful property of moving easily to a certain point destroyed. It was the top stone, therefore, of this Cragg which drew the common people together and raised their admiration; and I find that in the Cornish language Mea-an-bar signifies the top stone, and I do not at all doubt but that Men-amber is a corruption of Men-an-bar, and signifies nothing either relating to Ambrosius Aurelius, King of Britain, or to the Petrae Ambrosiae of the Ancients, as some learned men have thought." - Antiquities, 1754.

The letters in the last extract refer to a plan of the rock.[...]

Yours obediently,
Δ
From a letter in the West Briton newspaper, 20th January 1870. He signs himself as a capital Delta. I guess the 1870 equivalent of an internet name perhaps?!
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
18th February 2017ce

Er-Grah (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Er-Grah</b>Posted by costaexpress Posted by costaexpress
18th February 2017ce

Grand Menhir Brise (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Grand Menhir Brise</b>Posted by costaexpress Posted by costaexpress
18th February 2017ce

Gallow House Hill (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Gallow House Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Gallow House Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Gallow House Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Gallow House Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Gallow House Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Gallow House Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Gallow House Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
18th February 2017ce

Duntulm (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Duntulm</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Duntulm</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
17th February 2017ce

Old Keig (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Old Keig</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Old Keig</b>Posted by tiompan tiompan Posted by tiompan
17th February 2017ce

Ecclesall Woods (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Images

<b>Ecclesall Woods</b>Posted by spencer<b>Ecclesall Woods</b>Posted by spencer<b>Ecclesall Woods</b>Posted by spencer<b>Ecclesall Woods</b>Posted by spencer<b>Ecclesall Woods</b>Posted by spencer spencer Posted by spencer
16th February 2017ce

Kettley Crag (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Images

<b>Kettley Crag</b>Posted by Hob Hob Posted by Hob
16th February 2017ce

Cromeleque dos Almendres (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Cromeleque dos Almendres</b>Posted by costaexpress<b>Cromeleque dos Almendres</b>Posted by costaexpress<b>Cromeleque dos Almendres</b>Posted by costaexpress Posted by costaexpress
16th February 2017ce

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Rudston Monolith</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
15th February 2017ce

Soussons Common Cairn Circle — Images

<b>Soussons Common Cairn Circle</b>Posted by Ravenfeather Ravenfeather Posted by Ravenfeather
15th February 2017ce

Soussons Common Cairn Circle — Fieldnotes

Visited 5th February

It’s getting on in the afternoon, so looking for an ancient site that was a) easily accessible, with no massive hike required, and b) somewhere we’d never been before, limited the options somewhat. However a cursory look at the OS map seemed to show a likely candidate in the temptingly close to the road form of the Soussons Common cairn circle.

Heading south from Moretonhampstead on the B3212 we initially missed the turning, which probably in hindsight was a good thing, as it’s a very sharp left turn, which almost doubles back on itself. So turning around in the ‘blink and you’ll miss it’ village of Postbridge, and back up the road, we headed down the lane signposted towards Widecombe.

Within a couple of minutes the circle was visible off to our left in a clearing screened by forestry. There’s plenty of space to pull in, and I scamper out of the car and into the perfect little circle of twenty-three stones.

It’s almost too perfect here but I’m immediately struck by the atmosphere, it feels so welcoming and homely. Sheltered but not overpowered by the trees, seemingly remote but accessible on the quiet moors, pristine but not over-restored, there is just something about the place. An old camper van is discretely parked on a forestry track nearby, and the smell of wood smoke emanating from its chimney, along with the sound of wood being chopped for the fire, somehow just adds to the cosy air of domesticity.

It’s too damp for sitting, but I stand in the circle and ponder, surrounded by the sounds of the wind in the trees, birdsong, and the aforementioned crusty’s axe work. The central cist is well grassed over now, with only the top edges of the cist stones remaining as a faded outline, such a shame that people fail to treat these places with the respect they deserve, but at least this part of the monument is now protected as it slumbers beneath the turf.

Another of Dartmoor’s many gems, the circle is intimate in size, yet still gives a feeling of the specialness of the place. Once cairn stones would have filled this space, but today instead it feels a place of life, a small posy of heather placed by one of the stones showing it still holds a significant meaning for some, of which I am one.
Ravenfeather Posted by Ravenfeather
15th February 2017ce

Angus — News

Late Bronze Age Weapons Discovery Hailed As 'Find Of A Lifetime'


What an absolute belter of a find!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-tayside-central-38971099
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th February 2017ce

The Gypsey Race — Images

<b>The Gypsey Race</b>Posted by moss moss Posted by moss
15th February 2017ce

Anta Grande do Zambujeiro (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Anta Grande do Zambujeiro</b>Posted by costaexpress<b>Anta Grande do Zambujeiro</b>Posted by costaexpress Posted by costaexpress
14th February 2017ce
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