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Highland (Mainland) — News

Evidence of 'special site' for Bronze Age burials near Loch Ness


Archaeologists say they are finding increasing evidence that a site near Loch Ness was important for burials in the Bronze Age.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-42351956
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
14th December 2017ce

Isle of Skye — News

60 million-year-old meteorite impact found on Skye


Geologists have found evidence of a 60 million-year-old meteorite impact on the Isle of Skye.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-42351959
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
14th December 2017ce

Auchlee (Ring Cairn) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Auchlee</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Auchlee</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Auchlee</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Auchlee</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Auchlee</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Auchlee</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
14th December 2017ce

Cairnwell Ring Cairn (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Cairnwell Ring Cairn</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Cairnwell Ring Cairn</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Cairnwell Ring Cairn</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Cairnwell Ring Cairn</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Cairnwell Ring Cairn</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Cairnwell Ring Cairn</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
14th December 2017ce

Craighead (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Craighead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craighead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craighead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craighead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craighead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craighead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craighead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craighead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craighead</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Craighead</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
14th December 2017ce

Maen Llia (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Maen Llia</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Maen Llia</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Maen Llia</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Maen Llia</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
12th December 2017ce

Llech Lia (Enclosure) — Images

<b>Llech Lia</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Llech Lia</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Llech Lia</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Llech Lia</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
11th December 2017ce

Fan Nedd (north east) (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Fan Nedd (north east)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Fan Nedd (north east)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Fan Nedd (north east)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Fan Nedd (north east)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
11th December 2017ce

The Devil's Arrows (Standing Stones) — Links

The Smell of Water - The Devil's Arrows


fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
10th December 2017ce

Fron Goch Camp (Hillfort) — Folklore

Dick the Fiddler's Money

The adventures of rakish Richard (a 'fiddler' in more ways than one, not to mention waste of space husband to his long suffering wife) featuring his dodgy bewitched seashell currency obtained whilst returning home from Darowen. The hamlet displayed some political 'comment' of rather dubious intellect in its windows at the time of my visit. Hence I did not attempt to engage any local - why bother? - instead making straight for the excellent Fron Goch Camp rising above. Superb viewpoint, it has to be said.

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/wfb/wfb27.htm
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
10th December 2017ce

Moel y Garnedd, Gwastadros (Cairn(s)) — Folklore

Bala Lake

Long, long ago, there was a fertile valley where now roll the waters of Bala Lake.

"At last he reached the top of a hill, some considerable distance 'from the palace".... Although the story isn't specific - mythical legends, eh? - I guess it's not utterly unreasonable to suppose Moel y Garnedd, overlooking Llyn Tegid (Bala Lake), may have been the inferred destination of the harper... being an old man and presumably not up to a trek up any mountain proper:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/wfb/wfb23.htm
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
10th December 2017ce

Dyffryn Mymbyr (Cairn(s)) — Folklore

More fairy capers involving the "Fair Family", this time concerning changelings at Dyffryn Mymbyr:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/wfb/wfb43.htm
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
10th December 2017ce

Yr Wyddfa (Cairn(s)) — Folklore

The Mantle of Kings' Beards:

An account of the titanic, legendary struggle between King Arthur and Rhitta Gawr. Needless to say Arthur emerged victorious - well he would, wouldn't he? - the story (arguably) lending credence to the theory that Yr Wyddfa Fawr (Snowdon) was once crowned by the premier Bronze Age cairn in all Wales:

"...And Rhitta gave up the ghost, and was buried on the top of the highest mountain of Eryri, and each of his soldiers placed a stone on his tomb. The place was afterwards known as Gwyddfa Rhitta, Rhitta's Barrow, but the English call it Snowdon."

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/wfb/wfb39.htm
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
10th December 2017ce

Mynydd Pen-cyrn (Cairn(s)) — Folklore

Concerning one Ifan Sion Watkin - generally once apparently known as Ianto Coedcae - and his far out trip upon Mynydd Pen Cyrn. With "an abundance of strong ale and old mead to drink" one is tempted to hypothesise that the gentleman was pissed... however isn't it funny how such legendary antics find themselves associated with great Bronze Age sites?

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/wfb/wfb21.htm
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
10th December 2017ce

Carnedd Lwyd, Tyrrau Mawr (Cadair Idris) (Cairn(s)) — Folklore

The Fairy Harp:

A reminder to visitors out and about in the environs of this fine mountain to keep an eye out; not just for his giant-ness, Mr Idris (shouldn't be too hard to spot, to be fair)... but also the diminutive fairies at the other end of the scale, which, according to local lore, used to do the rounds knocking on locals' doors. Suffice to say it would appear wise not to upset the little people. Good for your elf, one might conclude:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/wfb/wfb19.htm

oh, and... The Man with the Green Weeds:

A cautionary tale for those intent upon venturing to the summit of Cadair Idris - yeah, Idris's Chair itself. You have been warned!

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/wfb/wfb53.htm
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
10th December 2017ce

Mynydd Mawr (Round Cairn) — Folklore

The Fairy Wife... apparently there were interesting goings on around Llyn y Dywarchen (the Lake of the Sod) back in the day:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/wfb/wfb15.htm
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
10th December 2017ce

Dinas Emrys (Hillfort) — Folklore

Dimas Emrys... Why the Red Dragon is the Emblem of Wales... and why every proud Welshman/Welshwoman (not to mention Briton... or anyone else, for that matter) able to make a visit to this haunting site really should do so:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/wfb/wfb11.htm
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
10th December 2017ce

Oweynagat (Souterrain) — Folklore

That night the three heroes [Laegaire, Conall and Cuchulain] were given as good a feast as before, but they were put to eat it in a room by themselves. When night came on, three enchanted monsters, with the shape of cats, were let out from the cave that was in the hill of the Sidhe at Cruachan, to attack them.

When Conall and Laegaire saw them, they got up into the rafters, leaving their food after them, and there they stayed till morning. Cuchulain did not leave his place, but when one of the monsters came to attack him, he gave a blow of his sword at its head; but the sword slipped off as if from a stone.

Then the monster stayed quiet, and Cuchulain sat there through the night watching it. With the break of day the cats were gone, and Ailell came in and saw what way the heroes were. "Are you not satisfied to give the Championship to Cuchulain, after this?" he said. "We are not," said Conall and Laegaire; "it is not against beasts we are used to fight, but against men."

...


There was at Cruachan the Hill of the Sidhe, or, as some called it, the Cave of Cruachan. It was there Midhir brought Etain one time, and it is there the people of the Sidhe lived; but it is seldom any living person had the power to see them.

It is out of that hill a flock of white birds came one time, and everything they touched in all Ireland withered up, until at last the men of Ulster killed them with their slings. And another time enchanted pigs came out of the hill, and in every place they trod, neither corn nor grass nor leaf would sprout before the end of seven years, and no sort of weapon would wound them. But if they were counted in any place, or if the people so much as tried to count them, they would not stop in that place, but they would go on to another. But however often the people of the country tried to count them, no two people could ever make out the one number.
From Lady Gregory's 'Cuchulain of Muirthemne' (1902), page 68 and page 148.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
9th December 2017ce

Clerkhill Wood (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Fieldnotes

With Storm Caroline for company obviously the best place to go for a walk was Clerkhill Wood near Bridge Of Don, Aberdeen.

From the Bridge of Don take the B997 north west taking the first minor road heading south, signposted Whitestripes (love that name!) and Grandhome. Go past the next minor road and pull in just at the next wood. There is a forest walk and it can be easily found. Sadly just look for all the empty tins (and other evidence of a fairly wild party) and you have reached the start of walk.

Follow the track straight west following the dry stane dykes which lead to Clerkhill Wood, once past the rubbish dump at the start, a very nice walk.

NJ 9078 1190 This is the best preserved hut circle and is an impressive size. It is almost 10m wide with walls well over 4m in width and in some places almost 1m high. The trees standing on these walls almost mark out the site. To the south the front door is almost 1.5m wide.

NJ 9079 1192 Going by my ratings this is the second best hut circle and is only a short distance from NJ9078 1190, only just over 20m to its centre. It also is 10m in width but has seen better days. The walls are about 3m in thickness and almost 0.3m high. Once again trees sit atop these walls.

Both of these sites are just to the north of the track. The third hut circle is to the south.

NJ 9077 1183 On the 'drew scale ratings' this is least preserved hut circle. Difficult to find it is just over 6m wide and has walls up 3m wide which come to height of 0.2m at its highest with trees sitting top. From its neighbours it is 60m to the south.

I walked to the southern edge of the wood, following the track, and found a view of the place were I used to work except instead of an office and a couple of warehouse there are thousands of houses stretching from Stoneywood, all through Mugiemoss (home to quite a few paper mills), Danestone and up to Bridge Of Don with more going up all the time. Sad really!

However Clerkhill Wood, worth a further visit I think.

Visited 7/12/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
7th December 2017ce

Clerkhill Wood (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Clerkhill Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Clerkhill Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Clerkhill Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
7th December 2017ce
Showing 1-50 of 127,117 posts. Most recent first | Next 50