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Highland (Islands)

<b>Highland (Islands)</b>Posted by LesHamiltonDun Neill © Les Hamilton
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Isle of Skye — News

60 million-year-old meteorite impact found on Skye


Geologists have found evidence of a 60 million-year-old meteorite impact on the Isle of Skye.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-42351959
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
14th December 2017ce

An Reidhean (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

Visited: May 23, 2017

The existence of this 'possible' stone circle was announced following a Discovery and Excavation in Scotland exploration on Skye's Strathaird estate in 1998. Don't go expecting to see a monumental structure: like most of Skye's stone circles, there is really very little remaining.

The site is located half a kilometre north of the small community of Drinan, situated half-way down the western margin of Loch Slapin. To visit, step on to the moor immediately north of the cattle grid (on the road, just before entering Drinan) and head north for 450 metres, uphill of the fence (you will have to park down in the village). The walking is excellent on firm, short heather and there are no fences to cross.

Make for the slightly higher ground and look down. The circle occupies a conspicuous grassy spot in the otherwise dark heather of the moor, about 40 metres west of the fence line. Three earthfast stones stand on the southern arc of the slightly raised grassy oval: the rest of the perimeter is devoid of stones. A trickle of stream runs close by it.

This location is about 30 metres northwest of the Grid location quoted by Discovery and Excavation in Scotland. However, I don't consider this significant: after all, the Grid reference they gave for the Cuidrach Stone Setting in 1989 proved to be more than a hundred metres in error.


 

The walk to the site is rather featureless but, as the map above shows, there is a slight 'greening' of the vegetation where the small stream trickles down past the circle. Also, looking east towards the loch, you should be level with a band of trees that straddles the path to the cottage beyond.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
18th September 2017ce

An Reidhean (Stone Circle) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>An Reidhean</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>An Reidhean</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>An Reidhean</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>An Reidhean</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>An Reidhean</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
18th September 2017ce

Rigg (Promontory Fort) — Fieldnotes

Visited: September 5, 2017

Though not highlighted on the OS Map, there is a lay-by at NC521581 just east of the A855 Portree to Staffin road, and this is the starting point for a visit to the remains of Rigg Promontory Fort. Be advised though, that this lay-by is deeply rutted - more like the surface of the Moon than a car-park. So drive with care.

From the lay-by, Rigg Fort is visible 130 metres below at the foot of a seriously steep, grassy hillside, as a triangular, grassy peninsula flanked on both sides by vertical 15 metre high cliffs. I would not recommend a descent unless you have a good head for heights, are an experienced hill walker and are equipped with stout hillwalking boots.

Nevertheless, the descent provides few terrors and the gradient, through grass and short bracken, can be eased by careful zigzagging on the way down. Remember: you will have to climb back up again, so a degree of fitness is essential.

The remains of Rigg fort consist of a wall, at least two metres thick, which completely cuts off the grassy peninsula. Only the inner and outer foundation courses, consisting of sturdy boulders, remain today, but it must have been a formidable barrier in its time. There is no sign of walling round the perimeter of the fort, but the vertical cliffs all around would have deterred any intruder. The peninsula abuts a narrow coastal plain where sheep graze today and where a community could have subsisted in isolation. A stream nearby would be a ready source of water.

There are distinct similarities between the Rigg Fort and Dun Grugaig near Glasnakille. Both fortifications consist of a thick wall that isolates a narrow, cliff-girt peninsula from the mainland. In the case of Dun Grugaig, there remains significant broch-like galleried architecture in the protecting wall, which in places stands four metres tall. At Rigg, the wall is reduced to its foundation level, but who knows what it might have looked like in its prime.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
9th September 2017ce
Edited 22nd October 2017ce

Rigg (Promontory Fort) — Images

<b>Rigg</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Rigg</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
9th September 2017ce
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