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Offerberg (Round Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Visited: July 17. 2017

Just a couple of kilometres west of the village of Rolde in Drenthe, in a secluded field, stands a striking Iron Age tomb called the Offerberg. This name means 'Hill of Sacrifices' on account of the ancient cremation remains found there.

The site stands beneath the canopy of a large tree in the middle of a large field of grazing cattle but cannot be approached directly on account of a perimeter electric fence.

Offerberg (Round Cairn) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Offerberg</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Offerberg</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Offerberg</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Dun Craig — Fieldnotes

Visited: May 25, 2017

This small ruined dun stands on a grassy knoll about 30 metres above the coast, to the southeast of Dun Maraig, on the South Cuidrach estate. There is little of note to record, except that Dun Craig occupies a fine vantage point towards the coast.

Dun Craig is hardly worth visiting on its own, but makes a fine walk when combined with other local antiquities (Dun Maraig, Dun Borve, Dun View and the Cuidrach Stone Setting).

A good path, with a stout fence to its east lies between the coast and Dun Craig, but there are stiles both before and after the dun to help you through.

Dun Craig — Images

<b>Dun Craig</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Craig</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Craig</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Craig</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Craig</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Isle of Skye — News

The Atlas of Hillforts of Britain and Ireland


https://hillforts.arch.ox.ac.uk/

I have spent some time examining this database, which was released into the public domain in June 2017, most particularly with respect with the area I am most familiar with: The Isle of Skye.

You would have anticipated that, following five years in its compilation, this atlas would be fully comprehensive. Despite claiming to be an atlas of hillforts, the 51 entries for Skye consist of an eclectic mix of hillforts, promontory forts and brochs. In total there are actually over 90 such sites on the island known to me, though to be fair, the Atlas does include seven entries that are not indicated on the OS maps, and which are new to me.

The actual selection of sites shows remarkable inconsistency. Along the east coast of Sleat, at the south of Skye, are the sites of at least ten known promontory forts yet the Atlas includes only four! In Waternish in the north, brochs Dun Gearymore and Dun Hallin are included yet Dun Borrafiach which lies between them is not. In Duirinish, Dun Colbost is included while the much more deserving Dun Boreraig is not. The latter is a particularly fine example of a coastal broch. These selections defy reason.

And most curious of all, just across the water on the mainland, the Atlas lists Eilan Donan Castle, apparently on a whim, because it: "may have occupied the site of an earlier fort" (something that has not been established).

Personally, I'm mightily disappointed. Canmore is far more comprehensive and will remain my primary source of information on hillforts. It is to be hoped that other areas within the British Isles have been much more carefully compiled, and provide the user with all the information they require.

Dun Creagach (Broch) — Fieldnotes

I had intended to visit this broch during June 2017 but having lost a day of my trip north to atrocious weather, had to leave this for a future visit. However, I did gain a chance view of Dun Creagach from across Loch Naver when visiting Grummore broch.

Canmore tells that this is a 'well preserved and comparatively undisturbed' broch which has been built on a small island, and which is connected to the shore by a causeway. Although much rubble surrounds the structure, the walling still stands over three metres tall in places and can be traced almost all round the broch.

Dun Creagach (Broch) — Images

<b>Dun Creagach</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Carn Liath, Farr (Broch) — Images

<b>Carn Liath, Farr</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Carn Liath, Farr</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Carn Liath, Farr</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Carn Liath, Farr (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: June 5, 2017

When motoring north along the A897 from Helmsdale to Melvich, and just over a kilometre north of The Borg, I came across the remains of Carn Liath broch nestling behind Trantlemore cemetery.

Not much to look at, this broch has been extensively robbed, and on approach is just a grassy mound with a scattering of foundation stones littered around it.
The interior has been gouged of much of its detail. It's almost as if a road had been cut through it, but there is a stretch of basal walling to be seen to its south.

This broch is certainly not worth going out of your way for a visit but, as a quick stop on a long drive north, it offers a short excursion to stretch the legs.

Allt an Duin (Skelpick) (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: June 7, 2017

Located atop a conical knoll, some 85 metres above the river Naver and about a mile east of it, Allt an Duin is protected by steep slopes, and in summer, a jungle of bracken. This is not a target for the casual walker as the ascent is demandingly steep, though it can be eased by making for the southern ridge and completing the ascent from there. Most of the ascent was through dense bracken, until almost at the broch, when heather took over.

The broch is built from large blocks of igneous or metamorphic rock and much of its structure is concealed under a massive expanse of tumbled masonry. Hardly any structure remains in view on the exterior, although the entrance passage on the west is still discernable. Within the broch there are a few stretches of the inner wall that still reach up to eight courses high.

This must have originally been a superb fastness, not only because of its situation—defended by steep slopes—but because of the amount of rock here. If all the rocks that have cascaded down from the hilltop were replaced in the broch, it would be a mighty structure indeed.

Access to Allt an Duin is along the single-track road to Skelpick, which follows the east bank of the River Naver from the point where the A836 from Bettyhill swings to the west.

Follow the Skelpich road for almost three kilometres, passing Lochan Duinte on the way, and park in the large sand-pit on the right of the road. Immediately across the road is a farm road and the broch is prominent on its knoll about 600 metres ahead.

Allt an Duin (Skelpick) (Broch) — Images

<b>Allt an Duin (Skelpick)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Allt an Duin (Skelpick)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Allt an Duin (Skelpick)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Allt an Duin (Skelpick)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Allt an Duin (Skelpick)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Allt an Duin (Skelpick)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Allt an Duin (Skelpick)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Allt an Duin (Skelpick)</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Dun Beag, Balmeanach (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Dun Beag, Balmeanach</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Beag, Balmeanach</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Beag, Balmeanach</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Beag, Balmeanach</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Beag, Balmeanach</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Beag, Balmeanach</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Beag, Balmeanach</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Dun Beag, Balmeanach (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

Visited: May 21, 2017

The fort of Dun Beag lies just over a kilometre due south of Dun Vallerain, and likewise on a steep conical hill. Park beside the cemetery 800 metres west of Brodaig from the A855 (blue marker), walk back up to the Brodaig-Uig road, then turn left and continue for around 400 metres till a gate comes into view on your right. Dun Beag now rears steeply above you and looks impregnable, but a path from the gate heads northwards and contours all of the way round to the west of the hill then leads up easy grassy slopes to the summit (red marker). The ascent is about 100 metres.



The upper slopes of the hill are covered in tunbled stones that were once the dun's defensive western wall. The summit is basically a level grassy plain (measuring 37 × 15 metres ) with few redeeming features other than the superb views it provides towards both th sea and the precipices of the Cuiraing. There is a well defined entrance passage bordered by large squared blocks in its upper reaches. To the east and north, the hill falls almost precipitously to the moorlands below and there is little evidence of walling. On the easier western slopes, traces of walling two courses deep can still be identified amongst the tumble. Judging from the quantity of tumbled stones on the western slopes, there must once have been a substantial defensive wall here. In a few places, on the southern and western slopes, intermittent stetches of the foundation course can still be found in situ.

United Kingdom — News

Hill fort hotspots in UK and Ireland mapped for first time in online atlas


For the first time, a detailed online atlas has drawn together the locations and particulars of the UK and Ireland’s hill forts and come to the conclusion that there are more than 4,000 of them, mostly dating from the iron age.


You can access this new database at

https://hillforts.arch.ox.ac.uk/

Dun Dornadilla (Broch) — Images

<b>Dun Dornadilla</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Dornadilla</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Leadoch (Broch) — Images

<b>Leadoch</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Leadoch</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Leadoch</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Leadoch</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Leadoch</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Leadoch</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Leadoch (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: June 8, 2017

Leadoch broch stands on a low, bracken infested knoll about 150 metres west of the estate road near the south of Loch Brora. The site is very dilapilated showing no internal structure at all, and with the outer wall little more than a mass of tumble. This site is hardly worth the effort of a visit unless you are already intending to make you way to the splendid Carrol broch about a kilometre farther up the valley.



Directions are the same as for visiting Carrol broch, except that you only have to follow the path for one kilometre before tramping through bracken on your left to Leadoch (about 160 metres).

Grummore (Broch) — Images

<b>Grummore</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Grummore</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Grummore</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Grummore</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Grummore</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Grummore</b>Posted by LesHamilton
Showing 1-50 of 1,280 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
A keen hillwalker most of my life, my interest was restricted when the need arose to care for an ageing parent.

With limited opportunities to travel far from home, I 'discovered' the world of stone circles, mainly in my native Aberdeenshire.

This provided the ideal opportunity for short walks of just a few hours duration, and resulted in me visiting many places of interest that I had never considered previously.

Website:
Stone Circles of NE Scotland
Here you will find both Google and Bing maps displaying more than 100 sites of stone circles, the majority in my native Aberdeenshire. The markers on the maps are clickable, to reveal a photo of the stone circle and a link to RCAHMS-Carnmore's Site Record.

A menu at the side of the maps allows you to zoom in to any individual circle, viewing its environs as a zoomable aerial photograph (Google) or an OS Map (Bing).

Hunebedden
I've since extended my interest to the megalithic remains in The Netherlands, where there are some magnificent passage graves known as hunebedden (giant's beds). Despite the fact that The Netherlands is essentially flat and sandy, these 5000 year old monuments from the Funnel Beaker Culture are often found in exquisite woodland settings, nearly all of them in the province of Drenthe. There are almost limitless opportunities for delightful walks between small villages, taking in a diversion to a hunebed here and there.

My TMA Content: