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Shiels (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Unlike its near neighbour Cairn Of Shiels there isn't to much to see except a what might have been feeling. Still the cairn has fantastic views west and at least retains some kind of circular shape. How long this will last is questionable, there are an unbelievable amount of wind turbines appearing in the Mearns.

Follow the directions to the Cairn of Shiels, jumping the fence as the track veers east. What remains of the site is 9m wide and at its tallest is 0.3m. Still at least it remains unlike a neighbour to the north.

Visited 28/5/2017.

Bridgeton Hill Cairn (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

I left the A92 taking the road past Balandro, the first tarred road south of Johnshaven heading north west. From Balndro follow the road until it ends and take the road heading south, passing the wonderfully named Parkhead to finally stop at a cottage at this roads end. Look north west and the cairn is clearly visible. Walk through a field, jump over the fence and climb a wee hill.

The southern side of the cairn is covered in the jabby stuff and difficult to see. However from my northern approach things are much clearer. Some large kerbs remain in place and much cairn material can be seen due to animal damage. Much of the cairn is covered in turf. It appears to be a cup and saucer Wessex type cairn similar to the fairly close Philla Cairn. The cairn is almost 20m wide and over 2.5m tall. Also visible is The Cloch RSC impressively looking down onto Bridgeton.

Sadly a dry steen dyke and fence go straight over the top of this impressive and large monument but it doesn't detract from the magnificent views.

Visited 28/5/2017.

Little Hill (Enclosure) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Little Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Little Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Little Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Little Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Norry Hill (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Norry Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Norry Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Norry Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Norry Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Norry Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Westfolds (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Westfolds</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Westfolds</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Westfolds</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Westfolds</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Learney (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Learney</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Learney</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Learney</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Learney</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Learney</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Learney</b>Posted by drewbhoy

The Reesk (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>The Reesk</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Reesk</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Reesk</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Reesk</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>The Reesk</b>Posted by drewbhoy

The Standing Stones of Stenness (Stone Circle) — Folklore

Tales From Eynhallow by Thelma Nicol

STANDING STONES

Mammy! Mammy!” Whut wey did that big stones git there?” Peedie Davo tugged at his mother’s sleeve. His mother was tired of Davo’s never ending questions about the great pieces of stone that formed the familiar landscape by the Loch of Stenness she promised, that if he was good she would tell him at bedtime, hoping that by that time he would have forgotten. She had not reckoned with peedie Davo’s determination to get an answer to his question.

“You promised Mammy,” he whispered as she tucked him up in bed. “Whut wey did they git there?” His mother shook her head and sat down wearily on the stool by his bedside. “Weel,” she began, “hid wis a long time ago and I canna mind the rights o’ hid bit hid wis afore the Norsemen cam tae Orkney, so they must be thoosands o’ years ould.”

“Oulder than Grandad?” Davo enquired, looking across the lobby where his Grandfather drowsed by the fire in the kitchen.

“Oh yass, far oulder than Grandad. There wisna many folk bade in Orkney at the time. All the folk lived doon sooth thoo see’s. They say that t he standing stones reach doon intae the grund twice as far as they stand abune hid .”

“Whut wey did they git doon there then I winder?” Peedie Davo’s enquiry into the origin of the Standing Stones of Stenness was proving to be more of a problem than his mother had ever imagined.

“Well,” she struggled on, “shut thee eyes like a good boy noo, and I’ll tell thee.” With fingers crossed that he would soon fall asleep she began. “Hid wis a midsummer’s night . The day hid been hot an quiet, not the usual breezy kind o’ wither that we usually hiv in June. The sky wis somet imes owercast and a rumble o’ thunder cam fae the direction o’ Hoy. There wis great flashes o’ lightning. A’ the birds wir quiet and the twa three folk that lived aboot hands wir huddled taegither. The bairns were a sleepan snug and warm under thir sealskin blankets.”

Peedie Davo’s mother paused and glanced hopefully at her small son. “Did the thunder come again Mammy?” he asked.?

“Oh yass,” she answered. “More thunder and rain like they have niver seen the like o’ afore or since. Suddenly there wis a great flash o’ lightning and the grund roond aboot Stenness wis thrown up like hid wis an earthquake. Some o’ the big stones landed upright and the grund fell back and filled up the holes except whar the Loch is noo. It filled up wae the rain water and so there’s been a loch there ever since and nobody’s ever bothered tae shift the stones so they are still there too. The twa three folk that hid lived in Stenness at that time wir thrown up in the air bit they landed in Stromness and decided to stay there. And that‘s the weyt here’s more folk in Stromness than in Stenness.”

There was a gentle snore from the bed and a sigh from peedie Davo’s mother as she whispered: “Whit a lot o’ lees thee mither tells thee Davo. Bit the truth is she disno ken whut wey the stones cam tae be there and nither dis anybody else. Goodnight Davo!”

St Ringan's Cairn (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

There isn't much left of the Saints cairn which sits to the east of the B974. A small heather/turf covered mound remains sitting at 8m wide/0.4m tall, with a scattering of cairn material. It is a well placed site as the Cairn O Mount can be seen to the north and a lot of the sites east of Laurencekirk also.

Take the track heading south on the east side of the B974. The cairn is situated next to the fence approximately 500 metres away.

Visited 18/5/2017.

The Ring (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

The Ring is a cairn basically situated inside an enclosure, 19m in width. Sadly this cairn and its surrounds will soon vanish amongst the forestry thanks to recently planted trees. Along with trees, turf covers the 7.5m wide/0.3m high cairn. Hardly any cairn material can be sitting on the mound.

Take the first tarred farm road heading west, south of the Clatterin Brig on the B974 (Cairn O Mount road) which heads to Arnbarrow. After about a 1/2 mile, take the road that heads south east, follow the road round the corner heading south. Immediately after the pheasant feeders look to the east of the road and the remains of the site will be found.

Visited 17/5/2017.

Aswanley Wood (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Aswanley Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Aswanley Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Aswanley Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Aswanley Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Aswanley Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Aswanley Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Aswanley Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Aswanley Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Broch of Gurness — Folklore

Broch Of Gurness by Thelma Nicol

from the Tales Of Eynhallow

I wandered round these ancient ruins,
With thoughts so far away,
I thought of hallowed customs,
When people here did stay.

And then I touched some weathered stones,
Someone had built with care,
Fashioned with an artist's touch,
Although no tools were there.

A hollowed stone where once a maid,
Had ground the corn for bread,
Blackened stones upon the floor,
Say: "Here a fire was laid".

Some skins spread on the floor, perhaps,
To keep the small room warm,
And in this ancient home, no doubt,
Children too were born.

A thousand years ago or more,
These warriors hunted deer,
And fashioned with their work worn hands,
Bead and bowl and spear.

Perhaps a thousand years from now,
Someone will wander round,
The ruins of our modern homes,
All scattered on the ground.

Will some machine-made cooking pot,
Or factory-fashioned cup,
Remain a thousand years somewhere,
For someone to pick up?

Tillyching 1 (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Tillyching 1</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Tillyching 1</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Tillyching 1</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Hillhead Of Tillyching (Enclosure) — Images

<b>Hillhead Of Tillyching</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hillhead Of Tillyching</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hillhead Of Tillyching</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hillhead Of Tillyching</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hillhead Of Tillyching</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hillhead Of Tillyching</b>Posted by drewbhoy

Tillyching 2/3 (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Tillyching 2/3</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Tillyching 2/3</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Tillyching 2/3</b>Posted by drewbhoy
Showing 1-50 of 6,786 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
Still doing the music, following that team, drinking far to much and getting lost in the hills! (Some Simple Minds, Glasvegas, Athlete, George Harrison, Empire Of The Sun, Nazareth on the headphones, good boots and sticks, away I go!)

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