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County Tipperary

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<b>County Tipperary</b>Posted by bawn79Ashley Park © Bawn79
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Web searches for County Tipperary

Sites/groups in County Tipperary:

7 posts
Ardcroney Burial Chamber
12 posts
Ardcroney Portal Tomb
6 posts
Ardmayle Artificial Mound
3 posts
Ashley Park Wedge Tomb
21 posts
Ashley Park Burial Chamber
2 sites
Aughsullish
3 posts
Ballagh I Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Ballagh II Standing Stone / Menhir (Destroyed)
1 post
Ballina Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Ballinacurra Cairn(s)
1 post
2 sites
Ballinahinch Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
2 posts
1 site
Ballinlough Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
2 sites
Ballinree Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
Ballinree South Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Ballyard Bullaun Stone
2 posts
1 site
Ballyconry Artificial Mound
2 posts
Ballymalone More Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Ballymorris Rath
1 post
Ballynahinch Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
1 site
Ballynahinch Round Barrow(s)
4 posts
Ballynilard Bullaun Stone
3 posts
Ballypatrick Bullaun Stone
3 posts
Ballyquinlevan Upper Bullaun Stone
6 posts
Ballyroan Cairn(s)
2 posts
Barnane Artificial Mound
9 posts
Bauraglanna Stone Circle
32 posts
2 sites
Baurnadomeeny Wedge Tomb
3 posts
Bendubh Cairn(s)
6 posts
Birdhill Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
1 site
Blackstairs Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
3 sites
Borrisnoe Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
Buffanagh Artificial Mound
1 post
Burgesbeg Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
Burgesbeg Standing Stones
3 posts
Caherabbey Lower Bullaun Stone
2 posts
1 site
Cahernahallia Artificial Mound
5 posts
Cappadine Standing Stone / Menhir
7 posts
Carrigeen Stone Row / Alignment
8 posts
Carron Henge Henge
4 posts
Castleleiny Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Cloghabreedy Artificial Mound
2 posts
Clonalough Standing Stone / Menhir
Clonamondra Artificial Mound
5 posts
Cloneen Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Cloneygowny Bullaun Stone
1 post
Clonpet Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Cloran Old Bullaun Stone (Destroyed)
3 posts
The Commons of Carney Cairn(s)
4 posts
1 site
Cooga Round Barrow(s)
5 posts
Coolagorane Upper Cairn(s)
8 posts
Cooneen Cairn(s)
3 posts
Cooneen Kerbed Cairn
8 posts
Corderry Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Corralough Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Corravalley Round Barrow(s)
4 posts
Coumroe Stone Circle
Crab Artificial Mound
2 posts
Creggane Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Crohane Lower Standing Stone / Menhir
10 posts
Cureeny Commons Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Derrynaflan Christianised Site
2 posts
Donaskeagh Standing Stone / Menhir
Drangan Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
2 posts
Foilacamin Cairn(s)
3 posts
Foilaclug Wedge Tomb
5 posts
Foilnamuck Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
Foilnamuck Wedge Tomb
3 posts
Foilycleara Wedge Tomb
8 posts
Garracummer Ring Cairn
2 posts
Garrangrena Lower Hillfort
3 posts
Garranmore Bullaun Stone
3 posts
1 site
Garraun Round Barrow(s)
4 posts
Giantsgrave Standing Stone / Menhir
13 posts
Glastrigan Stone Row / Alignment
1 post
Glenbane Artificial Mound
1 post
Glencarbry Cairn(s)
1 post
1 site
Gortavoher Bullaun Stone
2 posts
Gortnageragh Cairn(s)
4 posts
Goulmore Standing Stones
3 posts
Graniera Standing Stones
10 posts
Graves of the Leinstermen Standing Stones
2 posts
Greenane Cairn(s)
5 posts
Harps of Cliu Natural Rock Feature
1 post
Husseystown Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Jamestown Bullaun Stone
5 posts
1 site
Kedrah Fort Hillfort
2 posts
Kilcolman Sacred Well
3 posts
Kilfeakle Churchquarter Artificial Mound
3 posts
Killawardy
3 posts
Kilruane Bullaun Stone
3 posts
Knigh Hill Cairn(s)
1 post
Knockalton Lower Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Knockanora Cairn(s)
2 posts
Knockaunreelyon Natural Rock Feature
2 posts
1 site
Knockballynoe Standing Stone / Menhir
19 posts
Knockcurraghbola Commons Wedge Tomb
1 post
5 sites
Knockcurraghbola Crowlands
5 posts
Knockgraffon Motte Artificial Mound
3 posts
Knockmaroe Wedge Tomb
3 posts
Knockmorris Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Knocknabansha Wedge Tomb
Knocknagapple Artificial Mound
6 posts
Knockshanahullion Cairn(s)
6 posts
Knockshanbrittas (A) Wedge Tomb
3 posts
Lackamore Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Laghtea Hillfort
4 posts
Laghtshanaquilla Cairn(s)
3 posts
1 site
Lattin Artificial Mound
10 posts
1 site
Lisheentyrone Standing Stones
4 posts
Lissava Portal Tomb
2 posts
Lissballyard Bullaun Stone
8 posts
2 sites
Longstone Henge
4 posts
Lorrha Bullaun Stone
6 posts
Loughbrack Wedge Tomb
1 post
1 site
Mauherslieve Sacred Hill
3 posts
Middlewalk Round Barrow(s)
4 posts
Mullaghnoney Natural Rock Feature
4 posts
Pallas Upper Bullaun Stone
5 posts
Rathfalla Henge
2 posts
1 site
Rathneaveen Standing Stone / Menhir
9 posts
Rathurles Rath
6 posts
Rathurles Standing Stones
2 posts
Rathurles Rath
4 posts
Rath na Drinne Rath
3 posts
Reardnogy More
1 post
Reisk Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Rock an Tarbh Natural Rock Feature
5 posts
Roolagh Standing Stones
4 posts
Rosegreen Artificial Mound
2 posts
Rossadrehid Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
Scraggeen Standing Stones
1 post
Shanacloon Bullaun Stone
12 posts
Shanballyedmond Court Tomb
6 posts
Sheegouna Cairn(s)
4 posts
1 site
Shevry Standing Stones
16 posts
Shrough Passage Grave
6 posts
Slieveanard Cairn(s)
7 posts
Slievenamon Cairn(s)
2 posts
Springfield Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Sturrakeen Cairn(s)
5 posts
St Berriherts Kyle Sacred Well
2 posts
St. Patricks Stone Bullaun Stone
1 post
Temple-etney Bullaun Stone (Destroyed)
10 posts
2 sites
The Timoney Stones Standing Stones
5 posts
Togher Round Barrow(s)
3 posts
Toorfiba Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Toureen Peacaun Bullaun Stone
3 posts
Townfields Bullaun Stone
2 posts
Tullahedy Artificial Mound
2 posts
Warhouse Hill Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
1 site
Waterloo Hill Artificial Mound
4 posts
Whitstone Cairn(s)
Sites of disputed antiquity:
6 posts
Devilsbit Mountain Christianised Site
4 posts
Youghalvillage Sacred Well

News

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Archaeology in Tipperary Seminar


Archaeology in Tipperary Seminar

19th January 10.00 am - 5.00 pm

In association with its exhibition Earthern Banks and Broken Walls, South Tipperary County Museum will host a one day seminar on Archaeology in South Tipperary... continues...
bawn79 Posted by bawn79
15th January 2008ce

Iron Age discoveries at Two-Mile-Borris. Or not.


Interesting excavations have been made at Two-Mile-Borris, near the river behind Black Castle. A large central structure with surrounding huts has been discovered - houses for a chieftain and his family? There also seems to be evidence of some Iron Age technology - a water irrigation system... continues...
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th August 2006ce
Edited 17th August 2006ce

Links

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The Dolmens of Tipperary


The Dolmens of Tipperay by Henry S.Crawford

found from page 38 onwards of The Royal Historical and Archaeological Association of Ireland
VOl XL 1910

Also information and a picture of the bullaun stone at Gortavoher in the Glen of Aherlow showing the 2nd Bullaun stone that is beside the river not just the one beside the road - page 60
Includes pictures, plans and descriptions from this time.
bawn79 Posted by bawn79
26th June 2008ce
Edited 26th June 2008ce

Latest posts for County Tipperary

Showing 1-10 of 730 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Ballyard (Bullaun Stone) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Ballyard</b>Posted by Rhiannon<b>Ballyard</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th February 2017ce

Ballyard (Bullaun Stone) — Folklore

I cannot tell you how long it's taken me to track down the location of this site... variant spellings and unfamiliarity with the area did not help. But anyway it sounds superb so all this is worth the effort. I'd love to visit.

This is a naturally curious place, with a stream disappearing into the ground and reappearing: it's no wonder it's replete with folklore and Christianisation. I advise a glance at the Historic Environment Viewer map to see where the well, stream, 'bed', and bullauns all are.

This is an extract from an article on 'The antiquities of the Parish of Kilcomenty' in The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries for 1904:
About 30 yards east of the graveyard, a rapid stream which there issues from the ground is called St. Commaneth's Well. This stream flows from Ballinahinch, about two miles distant, and close beside the saint's bed; it is carried underground for nearly 200 yards, emerging at and forming the well; then, turning sharply by the south wall of the graveyard, it finally empties itself into the bog of Shower.

One of the legends told concerning the well is that long ago it was situated close by the stone known as St. Commaneth's Bed, but that some cattle having been accidentally allowed to sully its waters, the well in a single night moved down to its present site.

Two of the traditional trout said to frequent holy wells in Ireland are supposed to be here.

Over the well, completely shading its waters, are four ancient trees - one sallow, one whitethorn, and two ash. Those two last are in reality one enormous tree, which, near the lower part of the trunk, is divided in two, and its branches and the hollow by the well are covered with rags and votive offerings of every description, deposited by pilgrims who have made their rounds.

The summer of 1902 was exceptionally dry in North Tipperary, the month of August being phenomenally so. Springs, wells, and streams that in living memory had never been known to do so, ran dry; and St. Commaneth's Well formed no exception to the general rule, for it must be recorded that we failed to find even one drop of water within its usually brimming basin.

The rounds practised here are seven in number. Having taken seven pebbles from the stream running from the well, and having repeated the Lord's Prayer, Hail Mary!, Creed, and Gloria, the pilgrim throws one of the pebbles back into the brook, and proceeds to walk round the well. Following the course of the water for a time "sunwards," through the field south of the stream, he crosses it by a small bridge and enters the graveyard by a gate at the extremity of the south wall. Proceeding along a well-worn pathway by its north and east sides, he quits its precincts by a stile, which brings him to the well again, where he kneels and prays, and so on, until the appointed number of rounds are performed. While Mr. Westropp and I were in the cemetery, a country woman and two children "were making their rounds."

Close by the spot where the water of the stream disappears for a space under ground rests the traditional bed of the saint, lying north of the stream, and nearer to the road than the graveyard and well. It is a large irregular block of brownish sandstone, 8 feet long, and 4 feet 9 inches wide, extreme measurements, and stands about 2 1/2 to 3 feet high. The highest end is to the west, and here is a large and deep bullaun. To the west of this is a shallow, dish-like bullaun, and there are traces of two or more basins. Two sets of scorings are to be found on the stone; that nearer the top consists of six irregular broad strokes, not ogamic in character, while the set lower down consists of four slight scores. These markings are reputed to represent the impressions of the saint's ribs and hands.
There's some extra folklorey information in Lives of the Irish Saints by John O'Hanlon. He mentions that the prayers at the well are good for "bodily and mental ailments."

He says of the trout: "The following is a local legend. A person of the neighbourhood, at one time, scorning to respect the well, took one of these trout home, and made an effort to roast it; nothing but blood appeared, and the rascal had to bring the trout back to the well; but from that day forward, the family has not had good luck."

He mentions of the bed: "About two hundred yards noth-east of the well, in the midst of hawthorn and alder trees, there is a great Druidic rock basin, of brown sandstone, quite unlike stone of the immediate place, which is limestone," and that the basins are "always full or half full of water."

I love the way he mixes Druids and saints. He says "There is no doubt, that the stone lay, in its present position, long before the period of the patron saint. On the conversion of the Druids, he may have used the basins for baptizing the early Christians of the place, and may have rested on it occasionally. There is nothing impossible or improbable in this presumption, and tradition may be perfectly correct."
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th February 2017ce

Knockaunreelyon (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Knockaunreelyon</b>Posted by bawn79 bawn79 Posted by bawn79
28th August 2016ce

Shrough (Passage Grave) — Folklore

Not far from the Rock of Thorm there is a hill called Slieve Muc. There is a great crack in the hill. My grandmother told me that there was a great pig roaming around Slieve Muc so Finn and the Fianna went to kill it. When they found the pig they surrounded it. Finn, the leader, approached it with his sword in his hand. The pig, upon seeing Finn, attacked him. Finn fought for some time and wounded the pig. Then when the pig was tired, Finn, raising his sword above his head, put all his strength to one mighty stroke. The sword descended with such force that it severed the pig's head from its body and also made a great hole in the hill. It was from this episode that the hill got the Irish name of Slieve na Muc.
From the Schools Collection of the 1930s, now being digitised at Duchas.ie
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
21st June 2016ce

Ballymorris (Rath) — Folklore

After all the stuff about fairies this seems rather mundane, it's more like historical stories (albeit pretty muddled in its mix of pagan Irish tribes, Danish invaders and Christian institutions). The piece is still entitled 'fairy forts' though, so I guess the fairies turned up as tenants in the end.
In a field owned by Mr James Lonergan lie two large forts. They are situated by the side of the river Aherlow and are in the townland of Ballymorris.
It is said that they were built by the old Irish and in one of them a great chief lived. All that now remains of them is a mound of clay with a few whitethorn bushes growing round in a ring around it but once it was a huge fort.
Inside was the great house in which the chief lived: outside this was a great wall of clay and outside was a deep trench with the water from the river flowing into it.
When the Danes came to Ireland they plundered the fort, killed the chief and put the Irish tribe out and went in themselves.
It is said that they plundered St Pecaun's church andtook some of the Sacred Vessels away and hid them in the fort. By now they were very strongly entrenched and they plundered every church school and monastery in the surrounding district.
The Irish at this time were fighting amongst themselves but after a while they united and drove the invader out of the fort and out of the district also. They restored the stolen treasures to the churches, schools and monasteries.
From the Schools Collection of the 1930s, now being transcribed at duchas.ie.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th April 2016ce

Carrigeen (Stone Row / Alignment) — Images

<b>Carrigeen</b>Posted by bawn79 bawn79 Posted by bawn79
27th December 2015ce

Knockcurraghbola Commons (Wedge Tomb) — Images

<b>Knockcurraghbola Commons</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Knockcurraghbola Commons</b>Posted by bawn79<b>Knockcurraghbola Commons</b>Posted by bawn79 bawn79 Posted by bawn79
13th August 2015ce
Showing 1-10 of 730 posts. Most recent first | Next 10