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Rathangan — Miscellaneous

From archaeology.ie and worth quoting in full:

Class: Ringfort - rath

Townland: RATHANGAN (Rathangan ED)

Scheduled for inclusion in the next revision of the RMP: Yes

Description: The royal Fort of Rathangan was described in one of the earliest Irish poems as the burial place of the kings of the local clan. The poem records that the fort was located close to an oak woodland and that the ringfort belonged to the following local kings:

‘The fort over against the oak-wood,
Once it was Bruidge’s, it was Cathal’s,
It was Aed’s, it was Ailill’s,
It was Conaing’s. it was Cuiline’s,
And it was Maelduin’s.
The fort remains after each in its turn
And the kings asleep in the ground’ (Meyer 1913, 93).

The modern name Rathangan is derived from a corruption of the Gaelic name of the bivallate royal ringfort Ráth Iomgháin meaning the fort of Iomgháin (Bradley et. al. 1986, 413). In the year 801 the Annals of the Four Masters recorded that ‘Flaithiusa, son of Cinaedh, lord of Ui-Failghe, was slain at Rath-Imghain’ (AFM, 413). The Annals of Ulster recorded the same killing as happening four years later in 805 (AU, 291-2). Fitzgerald (1906-8, 137, 158) suggests that in the late 12th century Rathangan was granted by Strongbow to Maurice FitzGerald, ancestor of the FitzGerald lords of Offaly.

However Bradley (1986, 413) suggests that Rathangan may have been granted to Robert de Bermingham, as part of his cantred of Offaly (Orpen 1911-20, I, 381). By the middle of the 13th century the lands of Rathangan now forming the manor of Rathangan belonged to the FitzGeralds. In 1270 the custody of the manor of Rathangan [Rathingan] which formed part of the lands of the recently deceased Sir Maurice FitzGerald were granted to Thomas de Clare, brother of the earl of Gloucester, through his marriage with Juliana FitzMaurice, daughter of Sir Maurice FitzGerald (Cal. doc. Ire, 141). In 1308 Gerald, heir to Maurice FitzGerald, held his court at the manor of Rathangan (Cal. justic. rolls, Ire. Edw. II, 82). Rathangan was located on the borders of the Ui Concobhair/O’Connor territory of Ui Failghe. In 1331 on the death Richard FitzThomas, earl of Kildare the burgage rent of Rathangan was valued at £6 3s. 2d., indicating that there were 120 burgages (MacNiocaill 1964, 102; Bradley et. al. 1986, 414).

This bivallate royal ringfort is located at the W end of the village on high ground with good views in all directions. The 19th century C of I church and graveyard located 50m to the E probably stands on the site of the medieval church (KD017-011003-) and graveyard (KD017-011007-).

Ringfort described in the Ordnance Survey letters in 1837 as following; ‘this mound is at present planted, and is about one hundred and eighty [54.8m] in diameter, and measures from its base to its summit, slantwise, about forty two feet [12.8m], which would probably make about twenty eight feet [8.5m] in perpendicular height. It is encircled with a large ditch which is about seven hundred and thirty eight feet [225m] in circumference; and a fosse, which is partly destroyed, mostly on the south and east side’ (O’Flanagan 1927, 50).

Ringfort described by Bradley (1986 et. al., 418) as ‘a very large raised platform surrounded by a deep ditch and counter-scarp bank. The interior diameter is 60m E-W by 58m N-S. There is an internal bank, 2m wide, with a maximum height of 2m on the NE. The bank is eroded on the N and SW sides. There are a few raised areas in the centre but no coherent pattern can be discerned. It is surrounded by a ditch 6.5m in width and 4-5m in depth below the top of the internal bank. There are traces of a counter-scarp bank particularly on the E and S sides. There is a causeway over the ditch on the E’. Sweetman (1999, 13-14) suggests that the Anglo-Normans, re-fortified the ringfort in the late 12th century, which 'was altered to make it into a ringwork castle'.

Present remains consist of a fairly well-preserved, roughly circular, raised area (int. diam. 58m) enclosed by a broad, inner, earthen bank (Wth 9m; int H 1.7m; ext H 5m) best preserved along the N and E, denuded along the W and reduced to a scarp at SW, and by a U-shaped fosse (Wth 4m; D 2m). An entrance gap (Wth 3m) in the bank has a corresponding causeway (Wth 5.2m) across the fosse at SE. Mature oaks grow on the bank E-S-W, and both the outer faces of the bank and fosse are overgrown with briar and nettle. Two ESB poles stand on the outer face of the fosse, at N and SE. In 1955 'a slight outer bank' was noted (SMR file) today this outer bank which has been mainly levelled and is visible as a low rise of ground that is only visible when the vegetation cover is low such as in the winter months. (Otway-Ruthven 1980, 10; Bradley et al 1986 vol. 4, 418; Herity 2002, 133 (130); Stout 1997, 115-16)

Compiled by: Gearóid Conroy

Revised by: Caimin O'Brien

Date of revised upload: 4 March 2016

This monument is subject to a preservation order made under the National Monuments Acts 1930 to 2014 (PO no. 10/1970).

References:

1. AFM - Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters from the earliest period to the year 1616, ed. and trans. John O'Donovan (7 vols., Dublin, 1851; reprint New York, 1966)
2. AU - Annála Uladh, The Annals of Ulster; otherwise Annála Senait, Annals of Senat; a chronicle of Irish affairs, 431-1131, 1155-1541, ed. W.M. Hennessy and B. MacCarthy, (4 vols., Dublin 1887-1901)
3. Bradley, J., Halpin, A., and King, H.A. 1986 Urban Archaeological Survey - County Kildare (4 vols.). Unpublished report commissioned by the Office of Public Works, Dublin.
4. Cal. doc. Ire. - Calendar of documents relating to Ireland 1171-1307, ed. H.S. Sweetman (5 vols., London, 1875-86).
5. Cal. justic. rolls, Ire. Edw. II - Calendar of the justiciary rolls or proceedings in the court of the justiciar of Ireland, 1 to 7 years of Edward II. Revd. by Margaret C. Griffith (Dublin, 1956)
6. Herity, M. (ed.) 2002 Ordnance Survey Letters Kildare. Dublin. Four Masters Press.
7. Mac Niocaill, G. 1964 The red book of the earls of Kildare. Dublin. Irish Manuscripts Commission.
8. Meyer, K. 1913 Ancient Irish Poetry.
9. O'Flanagan, Rev. M. (Compiler) 1927 Letters containing information relative to the antiquities of the county of Kildare collected during the progress of the Ordnance Survey in 1838. Bray.
10. Orpen, G.H. 1911-20 Ireland under the Normans (1169-1216), 5 Vols. Oxford. Clarendon.
11. Otway-Ruthven, A.J. 1968 A history of medieval Ireland. London. Ernest Benn.
12. Stout, M. 1997 The Irish ringfort. Dublin. Four Courts Press.
13. Sweetman, D. 1999 The medieval castles of Ireland. Cork. The Collins Press.

Taylorsgrange (Portal Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

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Glencullen (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Glencullen</b>Posted by ryaner

Mount Venus (Burial Chamber) — Images

<b>Mount Venus</b>Posted by ryaner

Killiney Hill/Dalkey Commons (Cairn(s)) — Images

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Parkmore Cairn (Cairn(s)) — Images

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Parkmore Cairn (Cairn(s)) — Miscellaneous

From archaeology.ie:

Class: Cairn - unclassified

Townland: PARKMORE (Newcastle By.)

Scheduled for inclusion in the next revision of the RMP: Yes

Description: Situated in a small coniferous plantation on top of high ground in upland area with good views in all directions. Possible megalithic tomb (WI024-007----) located 130m to the NNW. Possible kerbed cairn (diam. 9m) defined by a contiguous ring of small upright boulders (H 0.3m-0.8m; Wth 0.45m) with an outer scree of loose cairn material (diam. 10.6m) and a possible central cist described by Price (1934, 52-3). Today only seven contiguous orthostats can be seen forming th kerb on the NNW side as the monument is ccovered in thorn bushes. However the remains of a central cist can be seen standing 2.5m in from the inner face of the kerb stones. This cist is formed by low upright stones (c. H 0.5m) forming a box-like structure with no capstone visible.
Described by Price (1934, 52-3) as a ’circle of stones, 30 feet [9.1m] in diameter, in the townland of Parkmore, in the corner of a field adjoining the road; the stones are small and set close together. In the centre is what looks like the remains of a central chamber consisting of 9 stones, enclosing a space about 4 feet [1.2m] long and about the same width. One of these stones is 2 feet [0.6m] above ground, and the others about 18 inches [0.45m]; there is no sign of any cap-stone. The whole space inside the circle is covered with small stones, and they extend for 2 or 3 feet [0.6m-0.9m] outside the circle; the surface is slightly higher than the level of the field. The monument has the appearance of a very much ruined cairn and burial cist. It is about 160 yards S.S.E. of the most westerly of the two pillar-stones (WI024-007----) already described. The pillar-stones are much larger than any of the stones in the circle’.

The above description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Wicklow' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1997). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

Compiled by: Caimin O'Brien

Date of upload/revision: 16 November 2012

References:
1. Price, L. 1934 The ages of stone and bronze in Co. Wicklow, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 42C, 31-64.

Ballybrack (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

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Parkmore (Standing Stones) — Images

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Ballyduff (Cup Marked Stone) — Images

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Moorstown (Newcastle By.) (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

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Pass of Kilbride (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

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Pass of Kilbride (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

From archaeology.ie:

Class: Barrow - unclassified
Townland: PASS OF KILBRIDE
Scheduled for inclusion in the next revision of the RMP: Yes
Description: On a prominent hillock with good views to the N, E and S. Possible ringfort (WM034-005----) 350m to SE. A small roughly circular flat-topped, mound (diam. 5.2m N-S; 6.3m E-W; H c. 1.3m) defined by a scarp with slight narrow fosse (Wth 1.6m; D 0.2m) around the base of the mound best preserved from W-N-E, not visible at S. Traces of a very slight depression visible on the centre of the mound.

Monument surveyed in 2015 and described by McGuinness (2015, 60-3) as following: ‘Monument comprises a roughly square-shaped mound with rounded corners (8.5m NNW-SSE x 9.2m WSW-ENE), flat top (5m N-S x 5.2m E-W) and steeply sloping sides, delimited by a shallow ditch formed of four straight lines (Overall dims. 11.5m NNW-SSE x 13m ENE-WSW), the corners sunken deeper than the channels connecting them as if the ends overlapped; possibly these represent pits or hollows left by decayed timber posts. Mound is oriented ENE-WSW (NE-SW), being higher and more massive at SW end; ditch is slightly trapezoidal in shape, the SW end measuring 11.9m in length while the NE end measures only 10.4m. Where highest at SW, mound rises 1.26m above ditch. Ditch appears to be best preserved on W side, where a thorn tree growing from side of mound arches over it; here it is up to 0.16m below external ground level. Ditch at E side appears at least as deep but is densely overgrown and inaccessible; ditch is very poorly preserved on S side. Ditch ranges in width from 1.6m at well-preserved W side up to 1.8m at N side. Immediately Beyond ditch on W side is what appears to be a low external bank—as this is by no means certain, maximum dimensions for the monument given above are derived from the ditch This barrow, marked ‘Moateen’ on OS 6” map, is strikingly positioned on flat summit of S end of low but very prominent glacial hillock with long axis running N-S, just N of the N6; and, but for vegetation, there would be good views in all directions. A raised bog visible only a short distance to N has been harvested for peat on an industrial scale, as have other raised bogs to S. This hillock is at N edge of the pass or strip of dry land that gives the townland its name—less than 1km across at this point—which runs E-W between areas of bog that have been an impediment to movement since prehistoric times: a remarkable cluster of ancient trackways has been discovered in the bogs to the S, the nearest cluster being c. 1km to SSE (WM034-009----/010---/01-2----/014----/015----), including one (WM034-014----) that has been radiocarbondated to 1390-1046 cal. BC, placing it around the junction of Middle and Late Bronze Age. The ASI document a possible ringfort (WM034-005----) about 350m to SE. Although not yet examined by the survey-team, a ‘motte’ (WM034-003----) lying immediately S of the N6 c. 700m to WSW of the present site could, from the ASI account given on the NMS website, be interpreted as a bowl-barrow, perhaps with stepped or otherwise shaped summit like those at Slane More and elsewhere in Ireland (McGuinness 2012, 12-13): Steep-sided mound (H 2m), there is a low rise on the centre of the summit, the significance of which is unclear. At the base of the motte from NE-E-S-W to WNW there is a wide shallow fosse. No visible trace of a bailey…. Traces of linear earthworks in field to the SW are visible on Bing Maps…. [and] could be the remains of a medieval road associated with the motte. [NMS website]. Monument lies between two ruined medieval parish churches on sites which Leo Swan (1988, 13, 21) attributed to the early medieval period: Pass of Kilbride, with St Bridget’s Well (WM034-001----/002----), only c. 700m to W but not certainly of early medieval date; and Clonfad, 2.5km to ENE, with a ruined medieval church, standing stone, early medieval high cross (Crawford 1927, 1-2) and a burial ground, including ‘the bishop’s grave’, surrounded by sub-circular earthworks representing the enclosing monastic vallum (WM027-066----/067----). The unusual rectilinear earthwork described here is not obviously a barrow, and indeed, as one ASI fieldworker observed on 8/6/71, ‘It does not appear to belong to any of the known classes of antiquity in Ireland’ [SMR file]. Nonetheless, it is a flat-topped mound surrounded by a ditch, which—angularity of plan aside—are features found in other Westmeath barrows; it is very strikingly located on a glacial hillock with excellent visibility, a type of location common for barrows in this and other counties; and the recognition of a second, prominently sited rectilinear barrow (WM027-027----) only c. 8km to NE seems to suggest that it is indeed a barrow, albeit of a hitherto unknown type in Ireland'.

Compiled by: Caimin O'Brien based on details provided by David McGuinness.

Date of upload: 10 February 2016

Woodtown (Cursus) — Miscellaneous

From archaeology.ie:

DU025-087----
Class: Cursus
Townland: WOODTOWN
Scheduled for inclusion in the next revision of the RMP: Yes
Description: A U-shaped earthwork is visible on an aerial photograph aligned approximately NW–SE; the curve of the U is at the SE. It is defined by a low bank and external fosse that encloses an area c. 125m by 45m. The precise nature of this earthwork is unknown and the possibility that it could be the remnants of a cursus-type monument cannot be excluded.

Compiled by: Paul Walsh

Tibradden (Wedge Tomb) — Images

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Tibradden (Wedge Tomb) — Fieldnotes

I've scouted around this area before and always given up due to access issues. We're just in the foothills of the mountains here, so there's maybe a bit more paranoia so close to the city when it comes to strangers traipsing across private land.

I realised from the archaeology.ie map that the 'tomb' is actually fairly close to some forestry and there's a car park in there not 400 metres from the site, so having given up on the Tibradden Lane eastern approach, I flew around to the Tibradden wood car-park.

About 200 metres south, in from the car-park you can walk though the thinned forestry and head north-west to the remains. The field here has been extensively quarried for gravel. I'm not sure that what I found is the tomb. It's listed as 'Megalithic tomb - Unclassified' on archaeology.ie and there are no more details. The only other online mention that I can find is the photo on the link that I posted. I've given this a wedge tomb classification given that Kilakee and Kilmashogue are close by, but I'm not confident that it's correct.

What does remain is overgrown and wrecked. There are some dressed stones and the most visible stones look like a capstone and a sidestone, part of some sort of chamber, though the capstone looks more like one from a portal tomb than a wedge tomb.

Tibradden (Wedge Tomb) — Links

Megalithics Monuments of Ireland


One photo of this wrecked monument.

Ardattin (Bullaun Stone) — Images

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Craans (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

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Aghade (Bullaun Stone) — Images

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Cloch An Phoill (Aghade) (Holed Stone) — Images

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Showing 1-50 of 2,884 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
Taxi-driving, graphic artist with a penchant for high hills and low boulders. Currently residing in Tallaght where I can escape to the wildernesses of Wicklow within 10 minutes.

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