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Montgomeryshire

<b>Montgomeryshire</b>Posted by KammerMaen Llwyd (Rhos Dyrnog) © Simon Marshall
Also known as:
  • Sir Drefaldwyn

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Sites in this group:

16 posts
Afon Disgynfa Cairn(s)
14 posts
Afon Y Dolau Gwynion Chambered Cairn
16 posts
Beacon Ring Hillfort
16 posts
Bedd Crynddyn Cairn(s)
3 posts
Beili Hwlyn Barrows Round Barrow(s)
3 posts
Black Bank Hillfort
3 posts
Blaen y Cwm Ring Cairn
12 posts
Breiddin Hill Camp Hillfort
1 post
Brynar and Riddle Round Barrow(s)
3 posts
Bryn Mawr Enclosure
12 posts
Bryn y Fedwen Round Barrow(s)
1 post
Caer Din Enclosure
1 post
Cae y Garreg Lwyd Natural Rock Feature
1 post
Carneddau'r Gwragedd Cairn(s)
12 posts
Carneddau Hafod Wnog Cairn(s)
1 post
Carneddgerrig Round Cairn
1 post
Carnedd Fach Cairn(s)
8 posts
Carnedd Gerrig Cairn(s)
1 post
Carreg-y-tair Eglwys Standing Stone / Menhir
15 posts
Carreg Hir Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Carreg Lwyd Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Cefn-Cyfronydd Enclosure
1 post
Cefn-yr-allt Hillfort
1 post
Cefn Carnedd Hillfort
21 posts
Cefyn y Castell Hillfort
2 posts
Cerrig-yr-Helfa Stone Row / Alignment
1 post
Cerrig Beddau Kerbed Cairn
22 posts
Cerrig Caerau Stone Circle
11 posts
Cerrig Cyfamod Glyndwr Stone Row / Alignment
15 posts
Cistfaen Cairn(s)
1 post
Collfryn Enclosure
52 posts
Corndon Hill Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
39 posts
2 sites
Craig Rhiwarth Hillfort
10 posts
Craig ty-glas Cairn(s)
6 posts
Crosswood Enclosure
2 posts
Crowther's Camp Enclosure
1 post
Crugyn Round Barrow(s)
10 posts
Crugyn-Llwyd Round Cairn
21 posts
Cwmbiga Long Cairn
10 posts
Cwm-y-Saeson Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Cwm Mawr Stone Axe Factory Ancient Mine / Quarry
Cwm Rhiwiau Stone Circle
1 post
Domen Giw Cairn(s)
3 posts
Dyffryn Lane Henge
14 posts
Ffridd Faldwyn Hillfort
1 post
Foel Cairn Cairn(s)
12 posts
Foel Fadian Round Barrow(s)
16 posts
Fowler's Arm Chair Cairn Round Cairn
17 posts
Fowler's Arm Chair Stone Circle Stone Circle
9 posts
Fron y Gog Hillfort
5 posts
Gaer Fawr (Welshpool) Hillfort
5 posts
Garnedd Wen Cairn(s)
1 post
Garreg Lwyd (Fronwen) Natural Rock Feature
19 posts
Glan Hafon cairn Cairn(s)
3 posts
Glonc Kerbed Cairn
1 post
Golfa Enclosure
6 posts
Graig Gethin Cairn(s)
10 posts
Henriw Standing Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
13 posts
Kerry Hill Stone Circle
13 posts
Llanymynech Hill Ancient Mine / Quarry
21 posts
Lled Croen yr Ych Stone Circle
18 posts
Lluest Uchaf Stone Row / Alignment
11 posts
Llwyn Bryn Dinas Hillfort
2 posts
Llymystyn Camp Hillfort
3 posts
Llyn Fawnog Ddu Standing Stone / Menhir
3 posts
Llyn Mawr Ring Cairn
9 posts
Llyn Mawr Standing Stone / Menhir
7 posts
Llyn Y Tarw Stone Circle
9 posts
Llys-y-Cawr, Allt Dolanog Hillfort
1 post
Long Hill Hillfort
7 posts
Maen Beuno Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
Maen Hir Standing Stone / Menhir
9 posts
Maen Hir, Glan Fedwen Kerbed Cairn
5 posts
Maen Llwyd (Commins Coch) Standing Stone / Menhir
16 posts
Maen Llwyd (Machynlleth) Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Maen Llwyd (Rhos Dyrnog) Standing Stone / Menhir
15 posts
Maes Mochnant Standing Stones
1 post
Moel Pentyrch Enclosure
1 post
The Mount / Bedd Garmon Round Barrow(s)
Mynydd-y-Bryn Round Cairn
2 posts
Pant Brwynog Cairn(s)
1 post
Pegwyn Mawr I Round Cairn
1 post
Pegwyn Mawr II Ring Cairn
1 post
Pentre Camp (Llangyniew) Hillfort
1 post
Penycerrig Cairn(s)
1 post
Pen-y-Clun Hillfort
3 posts
Pen-y-Foel Hillfort
23 posts
Pen-y-Gaer, Llanidloes Hillfort
1 post
Pen Cad Cymry Cairn(s)
4 posts
Rhos y Beddau Stone Row / Alignment
12 posts
Rhos y Beddau Stone Circle
4 posts
Roundton Hillfort
2 posts
Sarn-y-Bryn-Caled Cursus
3 posts
Sarn-y-Bryn-Caled (Destroyed) Timber Circle
2 posts
Shentons Tump Round Barrow(s)
Siglem Las Cairn(s)
1 post
Soldier's Mount Hillfort
33 posts
Staylittle Barrow / Cairn Cemetery
4 posts
St Mary's Well Sacred Well
4 posts
Tan-y-Coed Round Barrow(s)
5 sites
Trannon
3 posts
Twmpath y Crynwyr Round Cairn
Two Tumps Round Barrow(s)
5 posts
Whetstones Stone Circle (Destroyed)
4 posts
Whetstones Cairn Cairn(s)
8 posts
Yr Allor Kerbed Cairn
11 posts
Ystradfawr Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
Ystradfawr Cairn(s)
12 posts
Y Capel Stone Circle
1 post
Y Gaer (Meifod) Enclosure
Sites of disputed antiquity:
1 post
Bwlch y Gistfaen Burial Chamber
1 post
Church Farm, Trefeglwys Standing Stones
1 post
Craig yr Arian Burial Chamber
4 posts
Domen Round Barrow(s)
4 posts
Llanrhaeadr-ym-Mochnant Standing Stone / Menhir
7 posts
Maen Llog Standing Stone / Menhir

Latest posts for Montgomeryshire

Showing 1-10 of 842 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Glan Hafon cairn (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

What is it about me and high places? For a man with vertigo to be consistently drawn to hill and mountain tops over the entire course of my adult life could be considered somewhat paradoxical, perhaps? It's a valid point. Furthermore, any attempt to resolve such a personal conundrum is surely doomed to failure, if only due to lack of objectivity. However, for what it's worth.... let's start with punk. As, naturally, you would expect.

Although too young to appreciate the cultural, not to mention social impact of punk as it was happening - in retrospect I much prefer the insubordinate political potency of SLF than the comically naïve pseudo-Marxist bollocks of first wavers, The Clash - it was the 'don't believe them, question everything you're told' mentality which has had a fundamental impact upon my worldview. To deploy 'Why?' at the vanguard of the fight against blaggers and hypocrites. A pretty simple philosophy consistent with the DIY ethic of punk: to always see both sides of an argument by actively seeking an alternative viewpoint. Or at least try to. No-one's perfect. Needless to say putting competing 'stuff' into context can be difficult, requiring a suitable environment to allow the best use of whatever brain matter Nature has blindly accorded me, somewhere mercifully free from the seemingly endemic noise pollution all too prevalent today. Such as the high places of Britain, perhaps?

Yeah, the aerial viewpoint, by its intrinsically 'detached' nature, challenges one's perception of this crazy, spinning globe and, more importantly, of the antics of the human beings that depend upon it, a temporary stage for chasing passing visions. At least until we all bugger off to Mars with Matt Damon, that is. Hey, what a laugh that'll be. Party hats all round! In practice I've found the results to be instructive, the head full of human anxiety and contractions upon the approach to the parking area suddenly of no more consequence, by proxy - in the grand scheme of things - than the concerns of the inhabitants of a nearby ant colony. So, if there is such a thing as 'human spirit'.... a soul... that can (eventually) be determined from electricity flowing across synapses, arguably it is the primeval uplands than best meet the criteria for a 'spiritual domain'. If so, wouldn't it be ironic to note that our Bronze Age forebears appear to already have had that sussed millennia ago?

Anyway, aside from facilitating incoherent musings upon the most fundamental subjects, aerial viewpoints possess other, more tangible benefits... such as the ability to see detail in the landscape that can't be seen from below. No shit, Sherlock? Indeed it was during a visit to the fabulous hill fort surmounting Craig Rhiwarth last year that I first truly appreciated the form of Mynydd Glan-hafon rising across the cwm. Although falling a few feet short of the hallowed 2,000ft mark (1,994ft/608m) - and thus discounted from almost every 'serious' Y Berwyn walking itinerary you will come across - I guess the evidence of my own eyes heard the siren call. So, a hill must be a certain height to be worthy of my boots? Why? Ah, it's that punk ethic again.

Consequently I find myself reprising the ... it has to be said ... rather fine approach to Cwm Glan-hafon upon the green track skirting the south-eastern foot of the overwhelmingly sheer Craig Rhiwarth, one beady eye upon the threatening cloud base. The track forks right beyond some rather delectable woodland to descend to, and subsequently cross, the Nant Sebon. Continuing north, it soon becomes apparent that Mynydd Glan-hafon will offer no easy ride; the ludicrously steep gradient of the path encountered just beyond the deep gash carved by the Nant Ddial makes that as crystal clear as the cascading waters of the latter. The siren's call is strong, however - as Bernard Sumner will no doubt concur - and I eventually arrive at the col between Y Clogydd and Mynydd Glan-hafon itself.

According to Postman, not to mention the lesser authority of Coflein, there are a couple of cairns hereabouts upon this saddle. However I haven't done my homework so press on riding my little pony, so to speak, toward the summit. Despite having used all my vast (and ultimately useless) experience of these things and delayed leaving the path to avoid nasty occurrences of stamina sapping bog... I inevitably encounter an awful lot of the stuff. Too much. But there you are. Nevertheless I reach the summit ridge, taking a bearing from the fence line to the top of the Nant Ddial gulley. Just in case things deteriorate, you understand? As it happens the fence is a useful prompt leading travellers to the actual summit and, beyond a traverse fence to the east, the slightly lower trig pillar. As it is I ignore the latter being more intrigued by a small cairn surmounting a rocky outcrop near the junction.

Mynydd Glan-hafon is a wondrous viewpoint, arguably the best perch to appreciate this fact being the aforementioned cairn. This is not marked upon either the 1:25k or 1:50k map nor, indeed, cited by Coflein. However beneath the obviously modern 'marker cairn' resides a substantial, earth fast footprint. Now to judge by the paths - or rather, the paucity of them - up here upon this deeply unfashionable hill, the possibility of the cairn being erected by walkers is, in my opinion, pretty slim. Furthermore the cairn does not occupy either of the twin summits. So why construct a marker? Just saying. In my opinion this looks kosher. Other opinions most welcome.

As I sit and admire unfamiliar perspectives of the familiar... such as the main ridge of Y Berwyn rising to the immediate north, beyond the natural aquatic wonder that is Pistyll Rhaeadr, the sylvan beauty of the Tanat Valley, the mighty ancient fortress of Craig Rhiwarth etc.... the erstwhile reasonably clement conditions begin to falter as Moel Sych intercepts and subsequently grasps an incoming low cloud base to its not inconsiderable breast. Yeah, in very quick order visibility is reduced to more-or-less zero. For me, it is at times like this that upland cairns invoke the optimum 'spiritual' (here we go again) vibes, the opaque vapour inducing a very localised, almost claustrophobic intensity shutting out the outside world from any deliberations. Perhaps this idiosyncrasy was an integral facet of the Bronze Age plan, the Bronze Age experience? Assuming there ever was one and these monuments were not simply erected by ancient punks disavowing the 'rules'.

Time moves on and, despite having a fence line as my personal guide, not to mention preset compass bearing, the disorienting nature of walking in hill fog never abates. For me. Learning to trust one's judgement when all the senses are saying "Are you sure, you muppet?" has proved a major challenge across the years, one I doubt I will ever meet. But then again, so what? Leaving the sanctuary of the wire - and having opted to place self preservation before additional cairns - I manage to locate the Nant Ddial. Following a very steep, rough descent, the towering flank of Craig Rhiwarth slowly materialises through the dissipating gloom like a cosmic hand operating a rather dodgy natural cloaking device. Bit unpredictable, apparently. The return to the car is joyous, a feeling prevalent of being allowed brief inclusion within a spectacle outside of the normal human remit. Bit like hearing the opening bars to New Rose for the first time.

So... not at all sure I've managed to answer my autobiographical question posed at the start: why do I seek out the high places? Hey, maybe to some degree, perhaps? Although simply pointing at Mynydd Glan-hafon and uttering 'Why not?' might sum it up nicely enough. But then again, if Dave Vanian and Captain Sensible taught me anything growing up it's not to be afraid to challenge my preconceptions, to continually push my limitations. But primarily to try not lose the child inside... that sense of inherent curiosity and wonderment. That alternative 'aerial' viewpoint. Don't let the Ed Sheerans and Adeles of this bloody autotuned computer world we now find ourselves in drag you down. Yeah, who's to say what can and can't be done? Have a go and see. Just try not to kill yourself in the process should you choose to stumble in my footsteps. For me that's the true legacy of the punk ethic, my friends. The freedom to choose.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
31st March 2018ce
Edited 28th April 2018ce

New Pieces Enclosure, Breiddin Hill (Hillfort) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>New Pieces Enclosure, Breiddin Hill</b>Posted by juamei juamei Posted by juamei
25th March 2018ce

Crugyn-Llwyd (Round Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Approaching from Domen-ddu, a mile (ish) to the approx south, I find the large, grassy cairn crowning the 1,873ft summit of Crugyn-Llwyd to be far less obvious - topographically speaking - than I had envisaged. Indeed, upon arrival, I'm not at all convinced that Coflein haven't got this one badly wrong (the shame if it - oh me of little faith]. Yeah, all hill and no cairn. Please move along. Nothing to see here. However.... persevere, since, as it happens, this is very far from the case. For although Crugyn-Llwyd has reclaimed its eponymous Bronze Age monument as if clutching it close to its evergreen breast (so to speak) for safe keeping, it is nevertheless very much still here. As it has been for millennia. Hidden in plain sight, one might say. Without doubt the most effective camouflage.

So, following my own advice (for once) I go walkabout around the summit and, upon viewing the apparent monument from various angles, find that the artificial intent underscoring what we have here soon becomes all too obvious, the grass mantle no longer sufficient to deny the insight of a somewhat wonky prehistoric antennae now tuned to more-or-less the correct band width. Hey, just needed warming up a bit. Furthermore, albeit with some not inconsiderable effort, I manage to identify some stone subsumed beneath the turf and thus satisfy any lingering doubts. This one is a 'grower', as they might say. If 'they' were ever to venture up here, of course.

Note that not everything is rosy here. The cairn is unfortunately bisected by a boundary fence. Furthermore, the summit area to the east isn't exactly the most aesthetically pleasing in all Wales. Nevertheless this is a memorable place to be, even when lashed by periodic weather fronts, alternating with washes of golden light. A wild, uncompromising location seemingly divorced from everyday life 'down there' by some currently unquantifiable, additional dimension yet to trouble the scientists. Although to be fair Mr Hawking has probably already considered it. Whatever it is. As if to emphasise this sense of apparent 'other worldliness' a fox comes ambling by... sees the intruder.... tarries a while to check him out... then duly buggers off on his way again with a carefree 'skip' worthy of Father Dougal McGuire. Ha! Nothing to fear from that muppet, methinks...

As with neighbouring Domen-ddu, the west facing vista is quite superb; haunting, even, when perused at length under an ethereal September sky. A suitably expansive panorama for contemplating the sheer nebulosity of any notions of the passing of time, even those within scope of human comprehension. Or something like that. Maybe, on a much baser level, it's just damn beautiful. Inspiring, even?

Pegwn Bach rises to the approx north-north-west surmounted by an obvious - therefore presumably significant - 'Tumulus'. Further 'Cairns', not to mention serried ranks of wind turbines, are visible upon Pegwn Mawr beyond to the north. What with the Fowler's Arm Chair monuments located about a mile to the east it is clear quite a few homo sapiens called hereabouts 'home' back in the day. Yeah, word on the hill is a lot was goin' down back a few mill. Consequently strong walkers, or perhaps those content to spend less time sitting about than I, might consider expanding their itinerary to include the whole lot in one fell swoop?

But then again, in my opinion at least, there is a lot to be said for 'sitting about' upon hill/mountain tops.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
11th March 2018ce

Carneddau Hafod Wnog (Cairn(s)) — Miscellaneous

According to Coflein [J.J. Hall, Trysor, 13 July 2005] this diminutive cairn sited near the wondrous Pistyll y Llyn is:

"The northernmost of two possible funerary cairns on Carneddau Hafod Wnog. A small cairn, probably funerary, 6m in diameter at its base and 0.75m high, and built on top of a natural outcrop...The top of the cairn is flattened, with a slight depression in its centre, filled with numerous quartz boulders. The origin of the quartz is debatable - they may have been added in the recent past".

An excellent approach to both cairn and waterfall - the latter, to my mind, one of Wales' finest cascades - can be made from Cwm y rhaiadr at the terminus of the road heading south-eastward into the hills from Glaspwll.
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
1st January 2018ce

Glan Hafon cairn (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Glan Hafon cairn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Glan Hafon cairn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Glan Hafon cairn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Glan Hafon cairn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Glan Hafon cairn</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
3rd November 2017ce

Craig Rhiwarth (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Craig Rhiwarth</b>Posted by GLADMAN GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
3rd November 2017ce
Showing 1-10 of 842 posts. Most recent first | Next 10