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Maen Llwyd (Commins Coch)

Standing Stone / Menhir

<b>Maen Llwyd (Commins Coch)</b>Posted by postmanImage © Chris Bickerton
Also known as:
  • The Sanctuary Stone

Nearest Town:Machynlleth (10km WSW)
OS Ref (GB):   SH83590317 / Sheets: 135, 136
Latitude:52° 36' 48.19" N
Longitude:   3° 43' 10.27" W

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<b>Maen Llwyd (Commins Coch)</b>Posted by postman <b>Maen Llwyd (Commins Coch)</b>Posted by postman <b>Maen Llwyd (Commins Coch)</b>Posted by postman


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Only a short walk from the car, follow the footpath through a farm, once your in a field the stone is in the next door field, but a fence must be jumped. The stone leans to the south-west and is maybe three feet tall, it isn't on top of the hill or it would have terrific views, only the western horizon is visible. postman Posted by postman
31st January 2008ce


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This is the third of the stones mentioned by Lewis, in his 1833 Topographical Dictionary of Wales - about one mile north-east of the church.
In the parish of Darowen is the township of Noddfa, the name of which implies a place of refuge or a sanctuary, its limits probably being described by three stones - one called Carreg y Noddfa, standing about a mile to the east of the church, another large stone standing about one mile to the south of the church, and a smaller one about the same distance north-east of the church.
The Inventory for Montgomeryshire says it is 'reputed to be the smallest of the three stones.' But I can't see any sign of the named 'Carreg y Noddfa' to the east of the church on old maps. Which is a shame.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th January 2014ce
Edited 16th January 2014ce