The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Hunter's Tor (Hillfort) — Images (click to view fullsize)

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Hunter's Tor (Hillfort) — Miscellaneous

According to Pastscape this aesthetically pleasing site located, with far ranging views, to the immediate approx south-east of the crags of Hunter's Tor, represents the remains of a:

"Triple-ramparted hillfort of stone with shallow ditches, widely spaced with level berms 12m-15.5m wide between each rampart in the ttradition of SW England. Entrance is from the SE with the end of the middle rampart inturned to form an embanked entranceway which joins the innermost rampart. Entrance through the outer rampart and ditch via a causeway. The outer rampart and ditch are obscured on the slopes to the north and west. condition good despite the removal of much stone for field walls by farmers."[sic].

Access is excellent since the hill fort is traversed by a public bridleway... however please bear in mind that car parking, if approaching from the north, is non-existent. I therefore left my car roadside at the nearby hamlet of Barnecourt and walked back down the road, ascending via Peck Farm.

Black Hill (Stone Row / Alignment) — Images

<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Black Hill (Stone Row / Alignment) — Miscellaneous

According to the Devon & Dartmoor HER (HERMDV8076) the stone row upon Trendlebere Down (SX76600 79239) is:

"Probably a double row, much robbed, and many fallen stones; one undoubted pair of set stones left standing 940mm apart, face to face. It starts at the south end with a ruined cairn, now reduced to a mere ring-cairn. Terminates at north end in another ruined cairn, also reduced to a ring. At this end there is a mound which looks like an independent cairn. Its centre 15.24m to the west of the line of the row. More probably the remnant of the row cairn, turned back by the roadmen, who have despoiled both terminal cairns. The distance between the centres of the terminal cairns is 125.61m...."

Off road parking is available a little along the road to the north-west.. incidentally a short, stiff pull from here will reward the curious visitor with an audience with the quintet of large cairns upon the summit of Black Hill. Well worth the additional effort. But then I would say that, wouldn't I?

Also worth mentioning is that the stereotypical 'don't visit in summer if you can avoid it' caveat most definitely applies here.

Birch Tor (Cairn(s)) — Images

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Thornworthy Down (Cist) — Images

<b>Thornworthy Down</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Thornworthy Down</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Thornworthy Down</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Thornworthy Down</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Thornworthy Down</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Thornworthy Down</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Thornworthy Down</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Fernworthy stone row (North) (Stone Row / Alignment) — Images

<b>Fernworthy stone row (North)</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Fernworthy Stone Row (South) (Stone Row / Alignment) — Images

<b>Fernworthy Stone Row (South)</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Fernworthy (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Fernworthy</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fernworthy</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fernworthy</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fernworthy</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fernworthy</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fernworthy</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fernworthy</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fernworthy</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fernworthy</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Fernworthy</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Riddon Ridge Field Systems (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Riddon Ridge Field Systems</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Riddon Ridge Field Systems</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Riddon Ridge Field Systems</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Riddon Ridge Field Systems (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Miscellaneous

According to Historic England:

"The irregular aggregate field systems on Riddon Ridge are amongst the most extensive recorded on Dartmoor. Their relationship with the Dartmeet coaxial field system is of particular interest. The settlements and cairns provide useful information on the character of occupation in this area during the Bronze Age and together with the other Bronze Age remains, this monument represents an important and relatively rare instance of an area containing good examples of the major settlement and land division types found on the Moor...."

So, this sleepy, low ridge near to the tourist bustle of Bellever would appear of much more significance to students of Bronze Age domestic life than I assumed... as I chanced upon a very fine, solitary hut circle en-route to the funerary cairn.

More here:
https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1018930
Showing 1-50 of 10,428 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
Hi, I'm GLADMAN... aka Citizen Cairn'd. I've a passion for attempting to understand the lives of the pioneering prehistoric inhabitants of these British Isles, seeking out the remains they left behind in order to ask myself "why here ... why did it matter so... why such commitment?". Needless to say I'm still pondering such intangibles. Just as an empty house appears to retain echoes of past humanity... so does the stone circle, the chambered cairn, the long barrow and the mountain top funerary cairn. Visiting them, I think, helps engender a certain 'connection' with this land of ours, with ourselves - our past, our present and our future; a reference point for those of us perhaps struggling to make sense of this so-called 'computer world' Kraftwerk warned us was a'coming in 1981.... danke, mein herren.

I make no claims for my contributions except to state that I've done my best to relate what I've seen. Yeah, enjoying the moment has always taken precedent. If you like what you see why thank you. But please do your own thing. Think for yourself.

So cheers... to Mr Cope for being his inspirational, annoying, confrontational self, showing that field archaeology can be FUN! - hey, who'd have thought it? ...to my sister (the wondrous Mam Cymru) for using her female 'micro' vision to help me see the detail throughout an ongoing re-exploration of the South Walian uplands, albeit upon dodgy ankles, knees etc... to my own mam for insisting 'young men should have adventures' (that was a while back, now).... and my Dad for unwittingly inspiring a profound love of high places. Oh, and to Aubrey Burl for those pioneering guides BC.... 'Before Cope'.

For what it's worth some of my other inspirational people are:

Charles Darwin (for his humanity... amongst, er, 'other things');

And then, in no particular order:

George Orwell; Michael Collins (things are not often black and white...); Winston Churchill (for all his many profound faults... since without him I would not be here now); Martin L. Gore; Big Steve Chamberlain (sorely missed); Mr Beethoven; Giorgio Moroder; Richard Dawkins; The Pogues (for my North Walian soundtrack); Sophie Scholl (words fail me); W A Mozart (ditto); Michel Faber; Manic Street Preachers (the true spirit and voice of South Wales); Alan Pearlman; Nigel Kennedy; Will Shakespeare; Kraftwerk; Harry Hill; Claudia Brucken; Marc Almond; Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy; Christopher Hitchens; Mulder and Scully; John Le Mesurier .... and anyone who has ever asked 'Why?' - the true legacy of punk. Thank you Mr Lydon.

Oh, last but not least, Gaelic beauty Karen Matheson... the Scottish trips wouldn't have been the same without that voice. 'The call is unspoken, never unheard'.

George Orwell - '...during times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act'....

Truman Capote - 'Failure is the condiment that gives success its flavour'.

W E Gladstone - 'Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feeling for the strength of their argument. The heated mind resents the chill touch and relentless scrutiny of logic'.

William Blake - 'A truth that's told with bad intent; Beats all the lies you can invent'

John Lydon - 'It is a reward to be chastised by the ignorant'.

Christopher Hitchens - 'Take the risk of thinking for yourself, much more happiness, truth, beauty, and wisdom will come to you that way.'

Margaret Thatcher - 'It pays to know the enemy – not least because at some time you may have the opportunity to turn him into a friend.'

Jo Cox - 'We have far more in common than that which divides us'.

Sarah Cracknell - 'I walk the side streets home; even when I'm on my own...'

Winston Churchill - 'KBO'.

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