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Cerrig Duon & The Maen Mawr (Stone Circle) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Cerrig Duon & The Maen Mawr</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Fan Foel (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Fan Foel</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Twr-y-Fan Foel, Y Mynydd Du (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Twr-y-Fan Foel, Y Mynydd Du</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Twr-y-Fan Foel, Y Mynydd Du</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Twr-y-Fan Foel, Y Mynydd Du</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Allt yr Esgair (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Allt yr Esgair</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Allt yr Esgair</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Fan Gyhirych (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Fan Gyhirych</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Moel Feity (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Moel Feity</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Moel Feity</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Blaen Glyn (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaen Glyn</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Waun Leuci (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Waun Leuci</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Moel Feity (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Moel Feity</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Moel Feity</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Moel Feity</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Moel Feity</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Moel Feity</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Moel Feity</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Moel Feity</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Moel Feity</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Twr-y-Fan Foel, Y Mynydd Du (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Twr-y-Fan Foel, Y Mynydd Du</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Ogbourne St Andrew Barrow</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Tair Carn Uchaf (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images

<b>Tair Carn Uchaf</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Beacons Down (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Beacons Down</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Beacons Down</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Beacons Down</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Beacons Down (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

According to Coflein these barrows were only (finally) discovered - from the air - in 2013:

"Pair of well-preserved round barrows, discovered during Royal Commission aerial reconnaissance under snow on 24th January 2013. The barrows sit 60m apart on the northern edge of common land, which also preserves wider-spreading remains of ancient field systems. The smaller western barrow.. (SS88847580)... measures approx. 14m diameter and stands 0.6-0.7m high preserving its smooth, conical shape. The larger, flatter, eastern barrow (SS88927583).. measures approx. 21m diameter and stands 0.6m high...." Toby Driver, RCAHMW, Feb 2013

Blaneau-draw (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Blaneau-draw</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaneau-draw</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Blaneau-draw</b>Posted by GLADMAN

The Giant's Grave (Aldbourne) (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>The Giant's Grave (Aldbourne)</b>Posted by GLADMAN
Showing 1-50 of 10,315 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
Hi, I'm GLADMAN... aka Citizen Cairn'd. Or if you prefer, Robert. Now aside from (apparently) having an illustrious historical forebear in W E Gladstone, I've a passion for attempting to understand the more prosaic lives of the pioneering prehistoric inhabitants of these British Isles, seeking out the visible (and sometimes not so visible) remains they left behind in order to ask the questions... 'why here? ... why did it matter so; why such commitment?.. and why should I/do I care? Needless to say I'm still pondering such intangibles. Now I've a particular liking for those upland piles of stone with the appropriately monumental views; visiting them, I think, helps engender a certain 'connection' - however nebulous - with this land of ours, a reference point for those of us struggling to make sense of this so-called 'computer world' Kraftwerk warned us was a'coming in 1981.... danke, mein herren.

Suffice to say, then, that mine is not an exercise in dryly cataloguing sites for the benefit of future generations - as much as I might try (honest) I haven't yet been able to embrace altruism to that extent - but rather an attempt to try and reconcile why I am often so incredibly moved by these constructions of stone and/or earth representing a time when everything was, by all accounts, literally a matter of life and death. Yeah, just as an empty house appears to retain echoes of past humanity... an illusion, perhaps, but symptomatic of the consciousness that apparently sets us apart as a species... so does the stone circle, the chambered cairn, the long barrow and the mountain top funerary cairn. We may only be able to hypothesise as to the nature of human interaction undertaken. But clearly it mattered. A lot.

I make no claims for my contributions except to state that I've done my best to relate what I've seen. Yeah, enjoying the moment always takes precedent. After all life is not a rehearsal. I'd like to think some of them convey something of what an enthusiastic 'self taught' amateur has felt. Hence if you like what you see/read, why thank you! But please go see for yourself, make up your own mind, relate what you think, share what you experienced... yeah, do your own thing, so helping to keep the facists, communists, authoritarians, misogynists, myopic Guardian readers and the dark shadow of organised religion from the door. As the great, flawed Ian Dury once said, 'Be inspired, be inspiring, be magnificent!' ... and thus the circle turns in on itself to go round again, as upon the great kerb stones at Bru na Boinne.... Reasons to be Cheerful.. Part Infinity.

However... let's not get carried away. Steady now. In a society where computer generated fantasy is all too prevalent, where many people seem - to me - unable to even venture outside without plugging into the 'matrix' machine, please be aware that reaching some of the more remote, upland sites in the British Isles can be potentially dangerous - even life threatening - for the unprepared... or arrogant. I've been naïve/stupid, not having anyone to ask, and have fortunately got away with it. Just about. So treat the landscape and weather with the respect they deserve; take map, compass, waterproofs (etc) and hopefully you won't go too far wrong. Help turn that limited wannabe squaddie route marching mentality on its head by taking as long as you can, let being part of this planet soak in. Hey, if it all seems a bit daunting at first why not pop a question in the Forum? That's why Mr Cope puts up the readies to run TMA.... Thank you Julian.

So cheers... to Mr Cope for being his inspirational, annoying, confrontational self, showing that field archaeology can be FUN! - hey, who'd have thought it? ...to my sister (the wondrous Mam Cymru) for using her female 'micro' vision to help me see the detail throughout an ongoing re-exploration of the South Walian uplands, albeit upon dodgy ankles, knees etc... to my own mam for insisting 'young men should have adventures' (that was a while back, now).... and my Dad for unwittingly inspiring a profound love of high places. Oh, and to Aubrey Burl for those pioneering guides BC.... 'Before Cope'.

For what it's worth some of my other inspirational people are:

Charles Darwin (for his humanity... amongst, er, 'other things'... although let's not forget Wallace for forcing the great man's hand);

And then, in no particular order:

George Orwell (peerless essayist with the ability to change his mind); Michael Collins (things are not often black and white...); Winston Churchill (for all his many profound faults... since without him I would not be here now - it would appear Mr Cope despises Winston. Having undertaken my research... I disagree; a privilege Mr Churchill has accorded me); Martin L. Gore (favourite songwriter... from just up the road!); Big Steve Chamberlain (sorely missed); Mr Beethoven; Giorgio Moroder & his analogue sequencers; Richard Dawkins (much maligned - and asks for it - yet helping to carry the torch of reason during an age of devolutionary religious resurgence); The Pogues (for my North Walian soundtrack); Sophie Scholl (words fail me); W A Mozart (ditto); Manic Street Preachers (the true spirit of South Wales, not the bleedin' misogamist male voice choirs); Alan Pearlman.. for the sublime ARP Odyssey; Nigel Kennedy; Pat Jennings; Will Shakespeare; Kraftwerk; Harry Hill (there's only one way to find out!); Claudia Brucken (proving Germans DO have passion); the (Allied) generation of WW2 for making this possible; Marc Almond; Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy; John Foxx; Christopher Hitchens; Mulder and Scully; John Le Mesurier ('do you think that's wise, sir?'... the coolest man) .... and anyone who has ever asked 'Why?' - the true legacy of punk. Thank you Mr Lydon.

Oh, last but not least, Gaelic beauty Karen Matheson... the Scottish trips wouldn't have been the same without that voice. 'The call is unspoken, never unheard'.

George Orwell - '...during times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act'....

Truman Capote - 'Failure is the condiment that gives success its flavour'.

W E Gladstone - 'Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feeling for the strength of their argument. The heated mind resents the chill touch and relentless scrutiny of logic'.

William Blake - 'A truth that's told with bad intent; Beats all the lies you can invent'

John Lydon - 'It is a reward to be chastised by the ignorant'.

Christopher Hitchens - 'Take the risk of thinking for yourself, much more happiness, truth, beauty, and wisdom will come to you that way.'

Sarah Cracknell - 'I walk the side streets home; even when I'm on my own...'

Winston Churchill - 'KBO'.

Finally, regrettably... having witnessed several instances of pointless personal animosity over the years: Martin L. Gore -

'Now I'm not looking for absolution
Forgiveness for the things I do
But before you come to any conclusions
Try walking in my shoes' - or rather, boots.

Go on. Do it. Your thing. No one else can... so guess it's up to you.

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