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Y Garn (Pumlumon) (Round Cairn) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Y Garn (Pumlumon)</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Pegwn Bach (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Pegwn Bach</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Crugyn-Llwyd (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Crugyn-Llwyd</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Domen-ddu (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Domen-ddu</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Bryn Rhosau (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Bryn Rhosau</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bryn Rhosau</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bryn Rhosau</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bryn Rhosau</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bryn Rhosau</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bryn Rhosau</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Bryn Rhosau</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Carn Wen (Gwastedyn) (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Carn Wen (Gwastedyn)</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Carn Wen (Gwastedyn)</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Carn Wen (Gwastedyn)</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Carn Wen (Gwastedyn)</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Carn Wen (Gwastedyn)</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Carn Wen (Gwastedyn)</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Carn Wen (Gwastedyn)</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Carn Wen (Gwastedyn) (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Travellers heading south upon the A470 - or at least those with a tendency to, perchance, lift their eyes above the horizontal plane - will note, upon leaving the limits of the busy town of Rhayader, a substantial ridge dominating the skyline. This is Gwastedyn Hill, and, although rising to no more than c1,565ft, the 'summit' is conspicuously crowned by a neat 'beehive' cairn of the type so beloved by visitors to the erstwhile 'wilder', more inaccessible heights of Cwmdeuddw feeding the famously nearby Elan Valley Reservoirs with their not inconsiderable watery excess. However, appearances, as are often the case, are deceptive here, for no Bronze Age VIP was interred upon that rocky spine. Indeed, a rusting iron lattice-work 'beacon', set upon a post beside the cairn, commemorates a much more recent event... that of Queen Elizabeth II's 1977 Jubilee. An event which this then proto-Modern Antiquarian spent dressed as a pirate... well, as the wondrous Mr Ant said, 'ridicule is nothing to be scared of'... attending the local street party, whilst Mr Rotten and his dodgy cohorts had their collars 'felt' by the Thames river police. And Rod Stewart apparently got to No.1. Apparently. Don't get me wrong; The Pistols were just stupid kids.... but out of the mouths of babes, as they say. Curious how 'criminality' is sometimes defined, isn't it?

Nevertheless should one decide to park up just beyond the sewage works (on the right) and follow the (unsigned) public bridleway, steeply up through trees beside a tumbling stream in the general direction of Bwlch-y-llys, an equally taxing pull up the bare north-west flank of the hill will bring ample reward in a fantastic panorama to all points of the compass. Here the Royalist can drink his/her fill... the prehistorian, however, must head to the true summit of the hill some way to the approx south-east, where.... well, to be honest I don't think anyone's been able to define just what the hell is going on.

Two things, however, are apparent to me today: the remains of a substantial cairn still stand at SN98686614... the Carn Wen (White Cairn), one of a number so named in the extended locality; and secondly, the inclement weather, the peripheral effects of Hurricane Irma no doubt, is certainly in no hurry to leave. But what can you do? Except offer heartfelt 'thanks' to the wondrous institutions of Berghaus and Karrimor for the blessings of their waterproof garments. Not so much in physical genuflection, you understand?.... but such a posture does have much to recommend it when faced with rain seemingly not in obeyance of the laws of physics.

In my opinion Carn Wen is worthy of the honour of such personalised nomenclature. As Coflein duly notes, it features "...the remains of a substantial bouldered kerb and a possible cist". Always welcome features to find associated with one's upland cairn. Furthermore, to seal the authenticity deal, as it were, "A battle-axe, a bracelet and some other relics' were recovered in 1844 and a large erect stone was noted at the centre of the monument". So, clearly, what we have here is but the shattered remnants of what once was. But it is enough. Large, erect stones notwithstanding. However there is more... apparently much more, for immediately to the approx north-west stands the circular 'Druid's Circle' feature, currently interpreted as "a roundhouse and enclosure" (at SN98676615), whilst to the north-east, three further cairns have been recorded by CPAT. None of this detail was obvious to me, I have to confess. Although, in mitigation, lashing, freezing rain and swirling hill fog do tend to adversely affect observation. If not authentic upland vibe.

After a couple of hours the weather's onslaught finally triumphs over my resolve and I descend back to the car... ironically in brilliant sunshine. Yeah, Gwastedyn Hill is a curious place. Just what an apparently prehistoric 'enclosure' is doing immediately adjoining a bone fide summit burial cairn is, of course, open to much debate. If Iron Age, perhaps it was indeed - for once - actually associated with those enigmatic Druid priests, holding ceremonies with meaning now lost in the mists of time, if no longer, thanks to penetrating sun, opaque mists of H20?

Hunter's Tor (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Hunter's Tor</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Hunter's Tor</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Hunter's Tor</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Hunter's Tor</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Hunter's Tor</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Hunter's Tor</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Hunter's Tor</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Hunter's Tor</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Hunter's Tor</b>Posted by GLADMAN

Hunter's Tor (Hillfort) — Miscellaneous

According to Pastscape this aesthetically pleasing site located, with far ranging views, to the immediate approx south-east of the crags of Hunter's Tor, represents the remains of a:

"Triple-ramparted hillfort of stone with shallow ditches, widely spaced with level berms 12m-15.5m wide between each rampart in the ttradition of SW England. Entrance is from the SE with the end of the middle rampart inturned to form an embanked entranceway which joins the innermost rampart. Entrance through the outer rampart and ditch via a causeway. The outer rampart and ditch are obscured on the slopes to the north and west. condition good despite the removal of much stone for field walls by farmers."[sic].

Access is excellent since the hill fort is traversed by a public bridleway... however please bear in mind that car parking, if approaching from the north, is non-existent. I therefore left my car roadside at the nearby hamlet of Barnecourt and walked back down the road, ascending via Peck Farm.

Black Hill (Stone Row / Alignment) — Images

<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN<b>Black Hill</b>Posted by GLADMAN
Showing 1-50 of 10,460 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
Hi, I'm Robert ... aka Citizen Cairn'd. I've a passion for attempting to understand the lives of the pioneering prehistoric inhabitants of these British Isles, seeking out the remains they left behind in order to ask myself "why here ... why did it matter so... why such commitment?". Needless to say I'm still pondering such intangibles. Just as an empty house appears to retain echoes of past humanity... so does the stone circle, the chambered cairn, the long barrow and the mountain top funerary cairn. Visiting them, I think, helps engender a certain 'connection' with this land of ours, with ourselves - our past, our present and our future; a reference point for those of us perhaps struggling to make sense of this so-called 'computer world' Kraftwerk warned us was a'coming in 1981.... danke, mein herren.

I make no claims for my contributions except to state that I've done my best to relate what I've seen. Yeah, enjoying the moment has always taken precedent. If you like what you see why thank you. But please do your own thing. Think for yourself.

So cheers... to Mr Cope for being his inspirational, annoying, confrontational self, showing that field archaeology can be FUN! - hey, who'd have thought it? ...to my sister (the wondrous Mam Cymru) for using her female 'micro' vision to help me see the detail throughout an ongoing re-exploration of the South Walian uplands, albeit upon dodgy ankles, knees etc... to my own mam for insisting 'young men should have adventures' (that was a while back, now).... and my Dad for unwittingly inspiring a profound love of high places. Oh, and to Aubrey Burl for those pioneering guides BC.... 'Before Cope'.

For what it's worth some of my other inspirational people are:

Charles Darwin (for his humanity... amongst, er, 'other things');

And then, in no particular order:

George Orwell; Michael Collins (things are not often black and white...); Winston Churchill (for all his many profound faults... since without him I would not be here now); Martin L. Gore; Big Steve Chamberlain (sorely missed); Mr Beethoven; Giorgio Moroder; Richard Dawkins; The Pogues (for my North Walian soundtrack); Sophie Scholl (words fail me); W A Mozart (ditto); Michel Faber; Manic Street Preachers (the true spirit and voice of South Wales); Alan Pearlman; Nigel Kennedy; Will Shakespeare; Kraftwerk; Harry Hill; Claudia Brucken; Marc Almond; Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy; Christopher Hitchens; Mulder and Scully; John Le Mesurier .... and anyone who has ever asked 'Why?' - the true legacy of punk. Thank you Mr Lydon.

Oh, last but not least, Gaelic beauty Karen Matheson... the Scottish trips wouldn't have been the same without that voice. 'The call is unspoken, never unheard'.

George Orwell - '...during times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act'....

Truman Capote - 'Failure is the condiment that gives success its flavour'.

W E Gladstone - 'Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feeling for the strength of their argument. The heated mind resents the chill touch and relentless scrutiny of logic'.

William Blake - 'A truth that's told with bad intent; Beats all the lies you can invent'

John Lydon - 'It is a reward to be chastised by the ignorant'.

Christopher Hitchens - 'Take the risk of thinking for yourself, much more happiness, truth, beauty, and wisdom will come to you that way.'

Margaret Thatcher - 'It pays to know the enemy – not least because at some time you may have the opportunity to turn him into a friend.'

Jo Cox - 'We have far more in common than that which divides us'.

Sarah Cracknell - 'I walk the side streets home; even when I'm on my own...'

Winston Churchill - 'KBO'.

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