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Southern England

Sites/Groups in this region:

1 post
25 sites
Bedfordshire
7 posts
31 sites
Berkshire
5 posts
34 sites
Buckinghamshire
11 posts
29 sites
Cambridgeshire
61 posts
551 sites
Cornwall
18 posts
216 sites
Devon
15 posts
348 sites
Dorset
14 posts
34 sites
Essex
9 posts
171 sites
Gloucestershire
12 posts
175 sites
Hampshire
2 posts
76 sites
Herefordshire
4 posts
31 sites
Hertfordshire
15 posts
The Icknield Way Ancient Trackway
5 posts
60 sites
Isles of Scilly
4 posts
19 sites
The Isle of Wight
26 posts
35 sites
Kent
8 posts
35 sites
London
27 posts
37 sites
Norfolk
2 posts
17 sites
Northamptonshire
10 posts
125 sites
Oxfordshire
136 posts
1 site
The Ridgeway Ancient Trackway
19 posts
201 sites
Somerset
8 posts
27 sites
Suffolk
4 posts
41 sites
Surrey
3 posts
15 sites
Warwickshire
5 posts
58 sites
West Sussex
65 posts
353 sites
Wiltshire
1 post
16 sites
Worcestershire

News

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Know Your Place!


Know Your Place project puts three more counties on the map

Announcing the launch of Know Your Place in Wiltshire, Bath & NE Somerset and Gloucestershire

www.kypwest.org... continues...
Chance Posted by Chance
24th October 2016ce

South-West World Heritage Sites join forces for interactive sustainable transport map


For those who enjoy playing with maps and sustainable transport.......


Four of the South-West's most breathtaking nature areas, including the famous Jurrasic Coast, are hoping to make travel to the heritage sites easier than ever with a new website... continues...
moss Posted by moss
8th January 2010ce

Links

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The Wessex Hillforts Project


The Wessex Hillforts Project is an extensive survey of hillforts in central southern England.

The book is compiled by Andrew Payne, Mark Corney and Barry Cunliff and is available in paperback ISBN: 9781873592854.

The publication is now available to download free in PDF format from English Heritage. See above.
Chance Posted by Chance
11th January 2012ce

Latest posts for Southern England

Showing 1-10 of 31,206 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Pennance (Entrance Grave) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Pennance</b>Posted by Rhiannon<b>Pennance</b>Posted by Rhiannon<b>Pennance</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
25th May 2018ce

Branksome Library Stone (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Branksome Library Stone</b>Posted by texlahoma texlahoma Posted by texlahoma
2nd May 2018ce

Cley Hill (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

I've not been up here for a very long time. Perhaps you're guilty of the same sort of thing - tending to overlook local places for new and exciting ones that are further away. But my sister and I found this excellent, complete with its air of weirdness. (A couple of vaguely peculiar things happened while we were here, although normal people wouldn't have given them a second thought. Maybe you find more weirdness when you're expecting it.)

It was exposed here but dry, and we could see great globs of low dark cloud moving across the landscape, pouring on less fortunate places. There's a 360 degree view - quite uncommon round here where lots of high spots are joined onto bigger bits of land like Salisbury Plain.

We were mostly here for the wildlife (we saw kites, a yellowhammer and oil beetles among other things) and specifically for the snails. It got hilariously competitive as we hunched over little chalky scrapes out of the wind, my sister triumphantly brandishing a tiny shell a few millimetres high - What?! Why haven't I got that one... (Competitive snailing eh, whatever next. But it's amazing how much variety there is, and because they're empty, you don't have to feel too guilty about collecting a few shells.)

On reflection I suppose we climbed the hill in a spiralling way like the shape of a shell. Much nicer than the more ghastly straight-up approach - it's precipitously steep in places. Most of the hill is so windswept and open, but the quarried area on the south is such a strange muddle of lumps and bumps. They loom up over you and it feels strangely enclosed and surprisingly claustrophobic. But the quarried area doesn't take up the amount of space that you expect from the carpark. It's only a little area really.

There are other earthworks too -the Iron Age ridge that circles the hill for one. It doesn't feel very usefully defensive but maybe the slope would be enough to put most people off storming up. I did start to wonder, did anyone ever really live up here? The top isn't particularly big or flat like nearby Scratchbury and Battlesbury. You can imagine people in their huts there but not so much here. Yet Martin and Dave from the National Trust did find some here with their resistivity experiments.

This strange isolated hill advertises itself from all sorts of spots for miles around. You'd want to know who was in charge of it. And who was buried in the Bronze age barrows on top? It's funny to sit in their lea and have the same sort of view that people have seen for thousands of years (if you ignore industrial agriculture). There's also a linear dyke that's said to cut across one of the barrows, dating it at least a bit.

We also walked down the amazing sunken lane on the hill's south (part of the Mid-Wiltshire Way) - recommended as another numinous spot.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
30th April 2018ce

West Kennett Avenue (Multiple Stone Rows / Avenue) — Images

<b>West Kennett Avenue</b>Posted by Zeb Posted by Zeb
21st April 2018ce

The Longstone Cove (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>The Longstone Cove</b>Posted by Zeb Posted by Zeb
21st April 2018ce

Silbury Hill (Artificial Mound) — Images

<b>Silbury Hill</b>Posted by Zeb Posted by Zeb
21st April 2018ce

Hamdon Hill (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Hamdon Hill</b>Posted by Zeb<b>Hamdon Hill</b>Posted by Zeb Posted by Zeb
21st April 2018ce
Showing 1-10 of 31,206 posts. Most recent first | Next 10