The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

England

Country

Sites/Groups in this region:

1 post
2049 sites
Northern England
4 posts
3239 sites
Southern England

News

Add news Add news
Uffington White Duck

Those zany National Truss People really had me going then.

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/news/second-chalk-figure-discovered-near-uffington-white-horse?campid=Social_Central_Twitter_Conservation_Duck-010417
Howburn Digger Posted by Howburn Digger
1st April 2017ce

Environment Agency LiDAR - open data

"From September 2015 all our LIDAR data will become Open Data and everyone will be able to use it for free."

Although primarily used for flood risk assessment, there will be lots of archaeology to see.

https://environmentagency.blog.gov.uk/2015/06/16/free-mapping-data-will-elevate-flood-risk-knowledge/
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th July 2015ce

English Heritage to become charity by 2015

English Heritage has been given £80m in the government's Spending Review as part of plans for the organisation to become a charity. Some of the £80m awarded by the government will help to set up the charity so it will be fully operational by March 2015.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23064356
Chance Posted by Chance
28th June 2013ce

English Heritage and British Museum commission study into illegal metal detecting

English Heritage and the British Museum are so alarmed they have commissioned a £100,000 study into the practice. It could lead to new legislation to combat offenders.

Spotted at:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/07/08/nmetal108.xml
Posted by Robert Carr
10th July 2007ce
Edited 10th July 2007ce

New EH Chair


Lord Bruce-Lockhart to be new English Heritage Chairman

DEPARTMENT FOR CULTURE, MEDIA AND SPORT News Release (582007) issued by The Government News Network on 24 May 2007

Lord Bruce-Lockhart has been appointed Chair of English Heritage, the Government's statutory advisor on the historic environment, Culture Secretary Tessa... continues...
tiompan Posted by tiompan
24th May 2007ce
Edited 24th May 2007ce

Images (click to view fullsize)

Add an image Add an image
<b>England</b>Posted by Chance <b>England</b>Posted by fitzcoraldo

Folklore

Add folklore Add folklore
Folklore tales of the Devil from English Heritage:

https://historicengland.org.uk/whats-new/halloween/devil-folklore/
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
28th October 2016ce

Miscellaneous

Add miscellaneous Add miscellaneous
Some information that may be of use to TMA-ers looking at OS maps of England and Wales, from "Field Archaeology - Some Notes For Beginners Issued by the Ordnance Survey" (1963 - Fourth edition), chapter entitled "Tumuli":

"Today the term tumulus is reserved for those earthen mounds either known or presumed to be covering burials. Formerly a class of larger mounds, now known to belong to early medieval castles also received this name in error ..., but now are given their correct technical description or are described as 'Mound' in the appropriate type. All piles of stones are called cairns whether their funerary character is known or not, but the use of an 'antiquity' type will mean that the Survey believes it to be sepulchral. In some very lofty situations it will be obvious that they are not graves. Where a mound has a local name which clearly indicates the belief that it is a burial place the descriptive name tumulus is not added."
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
20th January 2009ce
Edited 20th January 2009ce

Links

Add a link Add a link

ADS


You can download EH's Archaeological Monograph on 'The Neolithic Flint Mines of England' (1999) by Topping, Barger and Field, from the ADS website.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
12th December 2014ce

Ancient Craft


Ancient craft is dedicated to the archaeology of primitive crafts and technologies that encompass the three prehistoric ages: STONE; BRONZE and IRON. This includes working with materials such as stone (also known as "flintknapping"), wood, bone, horn, leather, metals and cloth (plant fibres, and wools).

Follow Ancient Craft on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AncientCraftUK
Chance Posted by Chance
8th April 2014ce

Portable Antiquities Scheme Database


"The Scheme's database holds records of artefacts and coins found by the public, whilst pursuing a wide range of activities (the majority from metal detecting). We do not record details of objects found by archaeologists, and these data can be found within the local Historic Environment Office."

"The half a million objects recorded mark was reached on March 21st 2010."
Chance Posted by Chance
25th July 2012ce
Edited 25th July 2012ce

Early British Trackways, Moats, Mounds, Camps, and Sites


A Lecture given to the Woolhope Naturalists' Field Club, at Hereford, September, 1921, by Alfred Watkins

Download complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
10th July 2010ce

Grave-mounds and their contents


Grave-mounds and their contents
a manual of archaeology, as exemplified in the burials of the Celtic, the Romano-British, and the Anglo-Saxon periods

by Llewellynn Frederick William Jewitt
Published in 1870, Groombridge (London)

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
25th March 2010ce

Latest posts for England

Showing 1-10 of 47,347 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Avebury (Stone Circle) — News

Avebury neolithic 'stone square circle' discovered


An ancient "square stone circle" has been discovered under the Neolithic stones at Avebury in Wiltshire.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-40431673
scubi63 Posted by scubi63
29th June 2017ce

NT have bought the URC Chapel


Predictably perhaps, the National Trust has purchased the historic URC Chapel which stands within the Avebury Stone Circle. They are inviting people to come along in the afternoon and early evening (up to 7.00pm) on 5th July to share their views about its future use.
tjj Posted by tjj
28th June 2017ce

Lud's Church (Natural Rock Feature) — Folklore

... One comes unexpectedly to Lud Church entrance at which, on payment of threepence, with a reduction for quantity, in this case numbers, one passes through a rough wooden gate to the right and down worn steps into a long narrow chasm whose rocky sides vary between 30 and 50 feet in height.

The dank, damp air, moss-grown boulders, and air of desolation, produce an eerie atmosphere which is borne out by the history of this place. A ship's figurehead fixed high up in the rocks and known as the statue of Alice de Lud-Auk, or our lady of Lud, but in spite of the owners collecting dues from visitors this statue now lies merely a shapeless piece of wood on the floor of the defile.
So a part of history lies uncared for and some of us would wish that something had been done to preserve this most interesting feature.

Lud Church is also known as Traffords Leap because one Squire Trafford of Swythamley Hall, whilst hunting one day found himself on the brink of the chasm without opportunity of turning his horse and to save his life he made his horse leap across. Several hounds were killed as they failed to clear the cleft and fell upon the rocks below.

A popular superstition or legend avers that the redoubtable Friar Tuck here conducted services for Robin Hood and his merry men and it is certain that Lud Church has afforded sanctuary for outlaws and criminals.

It is also established that some of the Lollards held services and meetings for worship here during the persecutions of the reign of Henry V. At the upper end of the cleft is a cave which was used for those services of the Lollards, whose leader was Walter de Lud-Auk, and the story goes that soldiers surprised them during one of their meetings and attempted to fight their way into the cave.

Whilst the soldiers were being held at bay by Montair - a member of the sect - the rest tried to escape from the other end of the cleft. In this engagement, Alice, the beautiful daughter of Walter de Lud-Auk was shot by a bolt from a crossbow aimed by a soldier at Montair. Montair escaped to France and the rest of the Lollards were arrested. Walter de Lud-Auk died in prison.

The wooden effigy which used to commemorate Alice is said to have been the figurehead from a ship named "Swythamley" after the estate in which Lud Church is situated, which was taken after the ship was wrecked and erected in Lud Church in 1860.

Still another story claims that the figure represents Alice Lud who was shot by soldiers when they surprised a meeting of Luddites. Alice Lud was the leader of a band who met in Lud Church to make their decisions.

There have been attempts to explore the cave in which the meetings were held but falling stones have prevented any definite conclusion. The cave is estimated to have been 200 yards long and 100 yards deep.

[...] And just one more story, about Bonny Prince Charlie. The Prince had become separated from his army owing to a delay at Manchester, and was hurrying across the moors to meet his army which was expected to be below the Roches. Darkness had fallen when he reached Swythamley and so he and his bodyguard decided to sleep in Lud Church. Waking early next morning Prince Charlie was surprised to find a beautiful girl watching him. The girl ran away as soon as she saw he had woken but, when later he made a thorough search of the cleft, he discovered to his great delight that she was Flora MacDonald who had disguised herself as a member of his bodyguard in order to be near him.
From a piece in the Sheffield Independent, 30th September 1938.
TO PLEASURE PARTIES.
Visitors to Buxton are respectfully informed that E. ROBINSON, Dane Cottage, Quarnford, has permission from the owner, P. Brocklehurst, Esq. of Swithamley Hall, to SHOW LUDCHURCH. Refreshments may be had at the Cottage.

Buxton Advertiser. 8th September 1875.
LUDCHURCH. Tourists can be provided (Sundays excepted) with TEA, &c.; also with Milk, at the Manor Farm, Quarnford. Good Stabling.

Buxton Advertiser. 25th September 1880.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
27th June 2017ce

Oldbury Camp (Hillfort) — News

Archaeologists unearthing secrets of ancient hillfort in Oldbury-on-Severn


Little is known about the Iron Age fort, with mysteries and theories around when it was built and why it was built on the low land rather than, as the name suggests, on a hill.

The two-week excavation dig, which is being led by archaeologists DigVentures and A Forgotten Landscape, a South Gloucestershire Council-funded landscape partnership, is hoping to turn back the hands of time to find out more about the purpose of the hillfort.

More here:
http://www.gazetteseries.co.uk/news/15375035.Archaeologists_unearthing_secrets_of_ancient_hillfort_in_Oldbury_on_Severn/
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
27th June 2017ce

Wandlebury (Hillfort) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Wandlebury</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Wandlebury</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Wandlebury</b>Posted by A R Cane A R Cane Posted by A R Cane
26th June 2017ce

Nine Stones of Altarnun (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Nine Stones of Altarnun</b>Posted by Crazylegs14<b>Nine Stones of Altarnun</b>Posted by Crazylegs14<b>Nine Stones of Altarnun</b>Posted by Crazylegs14 Crazylegs14 Posted by Crazylegs14
22nd June 2017ce
Showing 1-10 of 47,347 posts. Most recent first | Next 10