The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Showing 1-50 of 436 posts. Most recent first | Next 50

Kerrera — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Kerrera</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Clach na Carraig (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Clach na Carraig</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Strontoiller 1 (Kerbed Cairn) — Images

<b>Strontoiller 1</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Clach na Carraig (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Clach na Carraig</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Gualachulain, Loch Etive (Round Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Site visit 21.10.16

My cycling days are over so I sent OH and the Teenage HD on down the barely surfaced road from Kingshouse to Gualachulain. My loudly complaining exhaust disturbed a rock band who were shooting a video in front of Stob Dearg. Sorry guys.
About 15km of bad road later and I pulled up at the wee car park. I'd seen the cairn as I passed it a few hundred yards back. Bright white and shining in the autumn light.
The drop-dead rugged scenery and pristine surroundings would normally attract huge numbers of tourists to views like this, but the sump-rupturing pot-holes and uneven road surface seems to put all but the usual idiots like myself off. I'd passed the other two thirds of my family throwing sangwidges at the Red Deer a mile or two back so I figured I'd have a little mosey over to the cairn near the cottage at Gualachulain. It would give my hissing engine a little time to cool and rest that clattering exhaust in preparation for the return up the glen.

The clear-felling of the small patch of surrounding forestry has been instrumental in exposing the cairn but thankfully there has been no manicuring of the landscape around the cairn. The only concession to visitors has been the erection of a fine four-step stile (with a top resting platform) over the top of the Deer Fence. This allows easy access and a grand elevated view of the site. The bark, twigs and tree-stumps are gradually being consumed by Nature's decomposers and munchers.
The cairn is constructed from white river-rounded stones. It stands to a fine height. There is a lot of it left. A fine curiously veined boulder tops the cairn. The loamy peat has been washed off a lot of the cairn mound now and exposes most of the stones. They gleam a bright white with just a couple of rounded stones being of a rosey-pink.

The nearby cottage garden on the other side of the Deer Fence does not intrude at all on the site's atmosphere. From atop this lovely cairn I watched the sun sweep amber rays across the foot of the mountains on the far side of Loch Etive. I heard the sound of screeching brakes and a voice shouted "Hi Dad! I think Mum'll be about ten minutes." I headed back over to the stile. Time to go.
Ten minutes later we were heading back up the glen, exhaust spluttering, engine hissing, two bikes slung on the back of the otherwise uncomplaining Golf. Oban Fish Bar beckoned with its blonde, pony-tailed waitresses and the finest fish and chips available anywhere.

Gualachulain, Loch Etive (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Gualachulain, Loch Etive</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Gualachulain, Loch Etive</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Gualachulain, Loch Etive</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Gualachulain, Loch Etive</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Gualachulain, Loch Etive</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Tre'r Ceiri (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

A walk to the City of the Giants. 25 September 2016

A spur of the moment decision to pop down to North Wales and see Auntie Betty and the family turned into a marvellous weekend of stormy seaside strolls, some good dining (with a few beers) and a Sunday Afternoon walk to the City of the Giants. A few years back when myself, my OH and son were en-route to a wedding at Nant Gwrtheyrn, I’d seen the signpost for the footpath and promised a walk up to Tre’r Ceiri next time we were down. Cousin Gavin had described the place to me and I’d checked it out on Google and Bing Maps. I had since seen the photos on TMA from postman, GLADMAN and thesweetcheat. On Saturday Night last, at dinner in Pwllheli, Gavin suggested a stroll to the City of the Giants on Sunday afternoon. We had spent Saturday watching kite-surfers riding a frothing cauldron and getting airborne at Hell’s Mouth, so I was a little uncertain as to what the weather would bring on Sunday, but a plan was made.
Sunday dawned bright and fair. Gavin and June brought the Gavmobile round to pick us up and we headed off. From Pwllheli you just head out on the A499 towards Caernafon and turn off to the left down a wee narrow street at Llanaelhaearn and head round the foot of the hills between Tre’r Ceiri and Mynydd Carnguwch. There is a great wee pull in spot here.
https://goo.gl/maps/WtLaa5RKoto
The footpath begins right across the road. A little steep at the start, then up over a stile at the top of the field, a little to the left around the big rocky crag of Caergribin and then it is a fairly level walk across the moorland to the foot of the crag which is the City of the Giant’s perch. I was genuinely floored with amazement as the bright sunlight picked out the faces of the massive stone walls. The flat tops of the mighty defences looked wide enough to drive a car around. My son ran ahead and I watched him dart up the steep entrance while I sweated it out on the heather flanks below. We were less than 30 minutes from the Gavmobile and hadn’t been forcing any kind of hard pace. This is a fairly easy walk and boy does it pay every easy stride back in spadefuls!
I’ll let everyone’s photos of this historical wonder do most of the talking here. There is an awful lot of stone meeting the eye. It is hard to take in the scale of the construction at Tre’r Ceiri. All around are the stoney, scree-strewn peaks of Yr Eifl, Moel-Pen-Llechog and the lower (yet strikingly beautiful) peaks which unfold down the length of the Llyn Peninsula towards Nefyn. But standing straight across from the City of the Giants is the mighty upright cairn of Mynydd Carnguwch, time and again I found my eye was dragged back to look at its profile. The Welsh sun shone all afternoon. We could have stayed all day.
The preservation is exceptional, the walls are a wonder, the simple areas of restoration are easy to spot (with their little drill holes). This is the most amazingly preserved, mightiest, most grandest, finest, panoramically stupefying-est, weirdly intoxicating hillfort I have ever been in. If you are in North Wales and can walk for half an hour or so on fairly easy terrain, get yourself up to Tre’r Ceiri, the City of the Giants. It’s a monster!

Mynydd Carnguwch (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Mynydd Carnguwch</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Mynydd Carnguwch</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Tre'r Ceiri (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Tre'r Ceiri</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Tre'r Ceiri</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Tre'r Ceiri</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

The Cochno Stone (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Images

<b>The Cochno Stone</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>The Cochno Stone</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>The Cochno Stone</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>The Cochno Stone</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>The Cochno Stone</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>The Cochno Stone</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>The Cochno Stone</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>The Cochno Stone</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Angus — News

Carnoustie's Golden Sword


Intriguing find under footie pitch.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=8e3_1473699545

Giant's Graves (Chambered Cairn) — Images

<b>Giant's Graves</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Aucheleffan (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Aucheleffan</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Aucheleffan</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Aucheleffan</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Aucheleffan</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Aucheleffan (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

Allt Nan Tighean (AKA "Aucheleffan Stones")
Site visit 20 July 2016

Parked the car at Kilmory Church and walked in via Cloined Farm (and Pottery). The route starts as the well surfaced farm road and deteriorates a little afterwards. It was twenty three years sinced I'd walked the route and yet the Beech Hedge on either side of the first 400 yards after the Pottery still seemed strangely familiar. On a particularly muddy stretch of pathway I was suddenly aware I was not wearing my walking boots... but had instead set off in the pair of comfy suede shoes I'd been driving in. I could see the well-metalled forestry road a little ahead, it was too late to walk back and change footwear now. The route up ahead was gonna be excellent so I carefully picked my way through the mud and puddles and made good headway after the Forestry Commission road started. Easy going for three or four kilometres, through Aucheleffan Farm and on up to the stones.
The continued clear-felling of forestry on the South of Arran has opened up the site beautifully, revealing a stunning view down across the South of Arran and across to Ailsa Craig. The view back up the hill doesn't have any such wow factor.
The clear felling has also revealed a few more stones a hundred yards due South of the Aucheleffan four poster. One in particular is an earthfast upright monolith about 1 and a half metres high and squared, tapering towards the top (in a typical Arran fashion).
In 1995 another four poster was reported about 200 metres South East of Aucheleffan Stones and is named on Canmore as "Aucheleffan". Due to high bracken and the mess of clear-felled Sitka Spruce debris this other four poster was not to be seen on this visit.

Other Four Poster

Creagdhu (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Creagdhu</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Drumelzier (Cairn(s)) — Links

Drumelzier on Canmore


Drumelzier (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Drumelzier</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Drumelzier</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Drumelzier</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Drumelzier</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Drumelzier</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Drumelzier</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Tinto (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Tinto</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Ballochmyle Walls (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Images

<b>Ballochmyle Walls</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

South Lanarkshire — News

Bronze Age Rapier Found


For those who know Blackhouse Burn this find is only a few hundred yards away at Cloburn Quarry.

http://www.wosas.net/news/cloburn.html

Stonehenge and its Environs — News

Superhenge at Durrington Walls?


http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/britains-superhenge-massive-4500-year-old-stone-monoliths-may-be-largest-prehistoric-monument-1518829

non rock art — Images

<b>non rock art</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>non rock art</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Tinto (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Tinto</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Mynydd Carnguwch (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Mynydd Carnguwch</b>Posted by Howburn Digger<b>Mynydd Carnguwch</b>Posted by Howburn Digger

Stonehenge and its Environs — News

Roll up... get your restored Stonehenge here...


http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B004AB01MW/ref=gb1h_img_c-2_7727_6704119f?pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_t=701&pf_rd_s=center-new-2&pf_rd_r=1CC36S43Q5VRV383AF1J&pf_rd_i=20&pf_rd_p=643587727

Orkney — News

Ancient grave found in Orkney


Archaeologists have been excavating the site of a child's grave on an Orkney island.

The grave - which it is believed could be up to 4,000 years old - was uncovered on Sanday's shoreline by winter storms and high tides.

It is thought the skeleton could be that of a child aged between 10 and 12.

The find was made by Carrie Brown, of See Orkney tours, who called in local archaeologists.

Historic Scotland was alerted, and experts were sent to Sanday on Saturday.

The skeleton will be analysed by an osteoarchaeology team in more suitable climatic conditions.

The remains were found on 3 February.



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-31313519
Showing 1-50 of 436 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
I live in Scotland with my other half and my twelve year old son.
I grew up looking across the Firth of Clyde to Arran. I first visited the island in 1980. I've gone back a few times every year since.

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