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Winterfeld (Passage Grave)

Winterfeld is a rectangular passage grave consisting of six pairs of support stones and an trapezoidal enclosure. The current state of preservation is good, a part of the enclosure is missing, as capstones. The tomb was excavated and reconstructed several times. The enclosure is northeast-southwest orientated, the reconstructed length was at least 54 m, preserved length is still more than 26 m, width between 5.5 and at least 7.3 m. The rectangular chamber is northeast-southwest orientated and is located in the southwest part of the enclosure. It is about 7.4 m long and and 1.6 - 1,7 m wide. The reconstructed chamber consists of fourteen Support stones and one capstone. The capstone measures about 2.2 m x 1.4 m x 0.4 m.

The tomb is located in the middle of Winterfeld, east of the church, in the parish garden. It is reached by a path that starts at the square next to the voluntary fire brigade and runs along behind the fire station. Look for an information board, leave it on your left hand and look for an iron gate behind the fire brigade building. The gate is secured with a split pin and can be opened at any time to enter the parish garden and to reach the tomb.

Visited March 2019

Nesenitz (Chambered Tomb)

Nesenitz is probably a grand dolmen with an enclosure. The current state of preservation is moderate to bad. The orientation and dimensions of the enclosure are no longer traceable today, since no enclosure stones are preserved. The chamber is west-east orientated, 1.9 m wide and at least 4 m long. Five supporting stones and two capstones are preserved.

You drive from Klötze in the direction of Bandau. Approximately 1.4 kilometers behind Klötze turn left towards Nesenitz. After 400 meters, the tomb is on the right of the road in a group of trees.

Visited March 2019

Nettgau (Chambered Tomb)

Nettgau is a grand dolmen consisting of four pairs of supporting stones. The current state of preservation is good, a capstone has fallen down, fragments of one or two other capstones lie in or out of the chamber. The rectangular chamber is oriented east-east-west-southwest, 5.3 meters wide and 1.5 meters wide. All eleven support stones and three of formerly probably four capstones are preserved. The largest capstone measures 2.5 m x 1.9 m x 0.8 m. An enclosure was already in 1843 no longer available.

The tomb is located north of a large chipboard factory on a field, but there is no way through the field, you should visit the tomb only after harvesting or before sowing. Drive from Nettgau on the K1127 towards Mellin. About 900 m after Nettgau, turn left on a side street in a northwesterly direction. Follow this road for approximately 1.8 km and pass the factory to your left until the factory site is over and a dirt road turns left. Either park your car here and drive on (not allowed) for 400 m. The tomb is under a group of trees in the field to your left.

Visited March 2019

Lüdelsen 6 (Passage Grave)

Lüdelsen 6 is a passage grave consisting of seven pairs of supporting stones and a trapezoidal, in the middle narrower enclosure. The current state of preservation is very good, only a few enclosure stones are fallen over. A stone on the eastern narrow side is no longer fixed, another is missing, as is a support stone. The entrance is not clearly recognizable, because some stones are missing or shifted. The enclosure is east-west orientated and about 35 m long and 5.2 - 8.5 m wide. Fifty of a total of sixty enclosure stones are preserved, almost all of them are exceptionally large. Three of the four cornerstones ("Guardians") and five other surrounding stones have been fallen over. The rectangular chamber is east-west orientated, 7.9 m long, 1.7 m wide, 1.1 m high and lies in the western end of the enclosure. Fifteen from formerly sixteen support stones and all five capstones are preserved, the biggest capstones measures 2.2 m x 1.9 m x 0.8 m.

You drive from the parking lot at the tombs Lüdelsen 1 to 5 in the direction of Lüdelsen. After about 650 meters there is a small sign with the inscription "Großsteingrab" on the street. Park your car here and follow the north-facing forest path 350 meters to an information board on the nature trail. There, turn left into the path and then reach the complex after about 170 meters.

The site, popularly known as the King's grave, is one of the largest and best preserved megalithic tombs in the Altmark region. Highly recommended!

Visited March 2019

taken from the "Archäologisch-historischer Wanderweg Lüdelsen (4)" information board:

Site 6 - The King's Grave

Construction/Burials: Funnel Beaker Culture (around 3700/3600-3300 BC);
Secondary burials: Globular Amphora culture (2800-2600 BC), Iron Age (700-500 BC)

The "King's Grave" consists of a trapezoidal enclosure of large boulder blocks (38 m x 5-8 m), which surrounds the long hill. Therein lies the almost 9 m long and 2.40 m wide burial chamber (internal height: around 1.50 m). The entrance on the south side of the chamber is only partially preserved.

The mound is multi-phase: The first, about 40 cm high mound was built between 3700-3500 BC. Only some time after the embedding of the approximately 1.30 m high second mound (from 3500-3300 BC) niches were created on the hilltop to position the large enclosre stones there - in this time also the edification of the stone burial chamber. The gaps between the boulders were carefully closed with a dry masonry of split red sandstone slabs. Between 2800-2600 BC the mound was again increased by about 0.50 m and the dry masonry was torn out.

After that the flanks were raised, so that only the upper third of the boulders was visible. At the same time, the chamber for post-burial (late Globular Amphora culture) was probably completely cleared and then filled with sand. An urn from the middle of the chamber dates from the early Iron Age (7th - 6th century BC).

The origins of the "King's Grave" are older than the megalithic tomb Lüdelsen 3 (Station 2). No tombs were discovered in the mounds, but on the surface of the first two mounds were several smaller shallow depressions of charcoal, the function of which is unknown.

The excavations were carried out in 2009 and 2010 as part of the research project "Megalithic Landscape Altmark".

Lüdelsen 5 (Chambered Tomb)

Lüdelsen 5 is a grand dolmen consisting of three pairs of supporting stones. The current state of preservation is moderate, one support and two capstones are missing, the mound is nearly eroded. The capstone is sunken and lies lengthwise on the chamber. A nearby stone could belong to a formerly existing enclosure. The rectangular chamber is northwest-southeast orientated, about 2.5 m long and 1.4 m wide. Six of the former eight support stones and one of probably two capstones are present. The remaining capstone measures about 2.2 m x 1.5 m x 0.8 m.

To get to the tomb Lüdelsen 5, go from the parking lot on a forest path, which is located opposite of Lüdelsen 3, back east towards Stöckheim. After about 30 meters you pass Lüdelsen 4 and after another 50 meters you reach the tomb.

Visited March 2019

Lüdelsen 4 (Chambered Tomb)

Lüdelsen 4 is a grand dolmen consisting of three pairs of supporting stones. The current state of preservation is moderate, one support and two capstones are missing, the preserved capstone has sunken. Neither an enclosure nor a mound are recognizable. The chamber is east-west orientated, about 3.3 m long and 1.4 m wide. Seven of the former eight support stones and one of probably three capstones are present. The remaining capstone measures about 1.8 m x 1.1 m.

To get to the tomb Lüdelsen 4, go from the parking lot on a forest path, which is located opposite of Lüdelsen 3, back east towards Stöckheim. After about 30 meters you will reach the tomb.

Visited March 2019

Lüdelsen 3 (Chambered Tomb)

Lüdelsen 3 is a grand dolmen and is located on a southern slope. Before the excavations began, only two capstones and two supporting stones as well as a mound of about 10 m diameter were visible. The tomb is oriented west-northwest-east-southeast.

The excavation revealed that the mound was built in two phases. The diameter of the second, larger mound could be determined to be about 30 m. Likewise, it was possible to identify two enclosures that consist of at least two circles of stones. The inner one could be clearly reconstructed. It consists of 10-40 cm field stones, which were placed in two to three layers on top of each other. The inner mound ends at the first enclosure. An outer row of larger stones is only partially preserved. Their original form is unclear.

In the area of the chamber more supporting stones came to light during the excavation. The chamber measures 4.2 m by 2.6 m on the outside and consists of seven supporting stones on which two capstones rest. Two additional support stones in the east form the entrance, which bends to the north.

The tomb lies only 40 meters north from the parking lot, left of the forest path.

Visited March 2019

taken from the "Archäologisch-historischer Wanderweg Lüdelsen (2)" information board:

Megalithic tomb Lüdelsen site 3

Construction: Funnel Beaker Culture (around 3550 BC);
Burials: Funnel Beaker Culture 3550-3200 BC;
Secondary burials: Single-Grave culture (2400 BC)

The construction of this site with burial chamber, a double or three-row stone embankment and the first mound was around 3550 BC. The chamber construction (inner height approx. 1.0 m) consisted of two capstones, seven support stones for the actual burial chamber and two more for the entrance. The gaps between the stones were filled with split wedge-shaped granite stones (dry-stone walling). The outer joints were carefully closed with 2-5 cm, smashed flint fragments. The larger splinters between chamber and entrance stones filled the builders with simple field stones. The two stone enclosures, built at the same time, formed with the entrance stones a court in front of the chamber, delimited to the outside by a freestanding menhir. The inner stone encirlce formed the boundary of the first, older mound. It reached to the lower edge of the capstones, which remained uncovered and visible. Finds (broken pieces and a cross-cutting arrowhead) from the non-paved chamber floor are from the first burials (Funnel Beaker Culture). The last funeral took place around 2400 BC (Single-Grave culture). In this context, a second mound of almost 30 m in diameter was built up, which completely covered the first mound and both stone enclosures. The capstones, however, were still visible. Since that time the chamber remained undisturbed. Findings from the area around the tomb prove that the people visited the site in the Bronze and Iron Age again and again.

After the complete excavation in 2007, the megalithic grave was rebuilt in 2008 on the basis of the excavation plans.

Lüdelsen 2 (Chambered Tomb)

Lüdelsen 2 is a grand dolmen consisting of three pairs of supporting stones and an oval enclosure. The current state of preservation is moderate, due to destruction during the road building numerous supporting and enclosure stones are missing or are fallen over. The capstones have sunk into the chamber and broken. The chamber is east-west orientated, the length is not reconstructable, width 8.5 m. From the enclosure eleven stones are preserved.

The tomb is opposite the parking lot in close proximity to the road.

Visited March 2019

Lüdelsen 1 (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

Lüdelsen 1 is one of the most southerly and the only polygonal grand dolmen that still exists today in Saxony-Anhalt. A Polygonal dolmen is a subspecies of the dolmen, which can be found especially in the north of the Danish island Seeland, in the Swedish province of Bohuslän, on the Kimbrian peninsula (eg Troldkirken in Jutland) and in Schleswig-Holstein (11 preseved tombs).

The current state of preservation is good, the edges of the hill are plowed, giving it a pointed-oval shape. An enclosure (Hunebed) probably has never existed. The chamber is northwest-southeast orientated and measures 2.5 m × 1.2 m with a visible height of 0.6 m. The size of the capstone is 2.9 m × 2.2 m × 1.0 m. On the capstone, which shape is responsible for the arrangement of the support stones, there are many small cup marks.

To get to the tomb Lüdelsen 1, go from the parking lot on a forest path, which is located opposite of Lüdelsen 3, back east towards Stöckheim. After about 30 meters you pass Lüdelsen 4 and after another 50 meters Lüdelsen 5. Lüdelsen 1 is then about 70 meters further, already in the field, on a small mound under a group of trees.

Visited March 2019

Lüdelsen

The megalithic tombs at Lüdelsen are a group of six more or less preserved tombs near the village Lüdelsen in the Altmark region (Salzwedel, Saxony-Anhalt). Two more tombs were destroyed in the 19th century. There may have been a ninth tomb, whereupon the field name "am großen Stein" (at the large stone) could indicate.

The tombs at Lüdelsen form three groups. The first is in a wooded area north of the road to Stöckheim. This group describes a line that runs from east to west, about 200 m long and consists of Lüdelsen 1 to 5. About 2 kilometers after Stöckheim in the direction of Lüdelsen you turn right after the forest has started into a forest road. There is a parking lot.

Lüdelsen 6 (the so-called Königsgrab -> King's Tomb) is located about 800 m further west. You drive from the parking lot at the graves Lüdelsen 1 to 5 in the direction of Lüdelsen. After about 650 meters there is a small "Großsteingrab" sign on the street. Turn right here and park the car.

South of the road, the now two destroyed tombs lay close to each other.

Visited March 2019

Stöckheim (Chambered Tomb)

Stöckheim is a grand dolmen consisting of seven pairs of supporting stones and an enclosure. The current state of preservation is good, capstones partially collapsed, most enclosure stones are missing, two supporting stones are fallen over, two supporting stones are missing. Most of the enclosure stones were already missing in 1843 at the time of Danneil, according to his statements they were unusually small. The trapezoidal chamber is north-south orientated and 9.2 m long and 1.8 - 2.2 m wide.

The northern capstone, which is the largest surviving capstone of all megalithic tombs in the Altmark, is still in situ. It is 4.5 m long, 2.9 m wide, 0.8 m thick and weighs about 22 tons. At its southwest corner, it has a deep groove (referred sometimes as blood groove). In its surface over 80 cup marks were incorporated.

The tomb is located about 100 meters behind the village exit of Stöckheim in the direction of Lüdelsen, left of the road and easily accessible via a field path.

Visited March 2019

Bierstedt 1 (Chambered Tomb)

Bierstedt 1 is a grand dolmen consisting of three pairs of supporting stones and an enclosure. The current state of preservation is moderate, two supporting stones and two capstones are missing, one supporting stone is fallen over. Johann Friedrich Danneil was still able to find an enclosure (Hunebed) in 1843 with a length of 23.0 m and a width of 6.9 m, now all enclosure stones are missing. The rectangular chamber is west-east orientated and 4.6 m long and 1.6 m wide.

The tomb is located 750 m nortwest of Groß Bierstedt, take the field track signposted to Gielitz and follow it for about 250 meters towards the forest. The tomb is then clearly visible on the right, about 75 meters from the path.

Visited March 2019

Mehmke 3 (Chambered Tomb)

The current state of preservation of Mehmke 3 is very bad, only a few enclosure and chamber stones are lying around in random order. So a classification is almost impossible. The chamber is oriented northeast-southwest. A total of 14 stones are preserved, including an upright support stone probably from the chamber. The remaining stones can not be matched.

The grave is located about 150m northeast of the megalithic tomb Mehmke 2 in the same field. During my visit, the surrounding trees were trimmed, so that in and around the tomb larger branches lay around, which were not transported away.

Visited March 2019

Mehmke 2 (Chambered Tomb)

Mehmke 2 is a grand dolmen consisting of three pairs of supporting stones and probably a rectangular enclosure. The current state of preservation is moderate, a large part of the enclosure and chamber stones are missing, just the mound is clearly visible. The rectangular chamber is northeast-southwest orientated and 4m long and 1.4m wide.

During my visit, the surrounding trees were trimmed, so that in and around the tomb larger branches lay around, which were not transported away.

Visited March 2019

Mehmke

The megalithic tombs Mehmke 2 and Mehmke 3 are two preserved Neolithic tombs near Mehmke, a district of Diesdorf in the Altmark region (Salzwedel, Saxony-Anhalt). The field name "Steenkamp" points to a third, destroyed grave.

Both tombs are located in a field about 600m north east of the village center, left of the old freight road Braunschweig-Salzwedel, nowadays a paved field track.

Visited March 2019

Bornsen 2 (Chambered Tomb)

Bornsen 2 is a grand dolmen consisting of four pairs of supporting stones. The current state of preservation is good, all supporting stones are still upright, two capstones have sunk into the chamber. The rectangular chamber is east-west orientated and 4.4m long and 1.1-1.2m wide. An enclosure is no longer visible. There are cupmarks on the western capstone.

The tomb is located on the eastern edge of Bornsen and can be reached via the road towards Wüllmersen. Just before you leave the village there is a yellow "Großsteingrab" sign on the right. Park here, pass the building on your right and walk southwest for about 140m to the tomb.

Visited March 2019

Bornsen 1 (Chambered Tomb)

Bornsen 1 is probably a grand dolmen consisting of seven pairs of supporting stones and probably a rectangular enclosure. The current state of preservation is good, all supporting stones and capstones are completely preserved and almost in their original position. Whether an enclosure was present, is not recognizable. The chamber is west-southwest east-northeast orientated and 10.4m long and 1.5-1.8m wide. The three western supporting stones and capstones are significantly larger than the four eastern ones.

The tomb is on the road Bornsen - Jübar, about 200 meters behind the last houses of Bornsen on a hill to the right side. Since it is located about 200 meters away from the road in a field, you should visit the tomb only after harvesting or before sowing.

Visited March 2019

Bornsen

The megalithic tombs at Bornsen, a district of Jübar in Altmark Salzwedel (Saxony-Anhalt) are a group of originally five megalithic tombs. Of these, only two exist today. The remaining tombs were destroyed in the 19th century.

Bornsen 1 is located 900 m south of the center of Bornsen about 200 m east of the road to Jübar in a field. Bornsen 2 is located 550 m northeast of the center of Bornsen and 1.2 km northeast of Bornsen 1.

Visited March 2019
Showing 1-20 of 221 fieldnotes. Most recent first | Next 20
During my first trip to Ireland back in 2006, I was bitten by the 'megalithic' bug and since then I seek for every opportunity to visit as much sites as possible, with a bias for stone circles.

As I live in the southwest of Germany (not an area famous for megaliths), I rely on my holidays to be able to visit these sites.

My TMA Content: