The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Sievern (Passage Grave)

The Bülzenbett is a passage grave with an approximately 8 × 4.7 meter chamber, with internal dimensions of about 2.0 to 2.5 × 6 meters with the three colossal capstones, one of which measures 4 × 3 meters. The middle capstone was blown up between 1604 and 1755, it still has a number of drill holes and is partially fallen into the interior of the chamber. The capstones are resting on nine support stones. A support stone on the southern long side is missing.

The Bülzenbett has a trapezoidal enclosure of about 35 m in length. Of their original 55 stones are still 33 available. Many are still in their original position, some were set up again during the restoration in 1970. They form an easterly rejuvenating trapeze measuring 8.5 by 6.5 by 35.5 meters.

In the middle of the 19th century, a small stone chamber was found within the enclosure, in which a hatchet and a flint dagger were found.

The capstones of the burial chamber of Bülzenbett should be among the largest capstones of all megalithic tombs in Germany. Even the two parts of the blasted middle capstone are still huge! A visit along with the nearby Pipinsburg and a hike on the archaeological trail is not only interesting because of the monuments lying along the way, but also very scenic!

To get to the tomb, take the L135 from Sievern northwards towards Holßel. After 750 m you come to a car park for the Pipinsburg on the right side.

Visited June 2019

taken from the on-site information board:

Megatilthic tomb "Bülzenbett"

The Bülzenbett is a megalithic tomb of the Neolithic Funnel Beaker Culture (2nd half 3rd millennium BC). The burial chamber consists of nine support stones (formerly 10) and three capstones.

The middle capstone was blown up and thereby partially fell into the interior of the burial chamber. The still recognizable drill holes indicate that it should be further crushed and then driven off. The date of the damage can be determined relatively accurately: on a copperplate engraving made by Wilhelm Dilich from 1604 the Bülzenbett is shown intact, in 1755 Martin Mushard illustrated the Bülzenbett with the damaged capstone, as can still be seen today.

When the archaeological preservation of the district in the summer of 1970 put the entire complex back in a state worth visiting, the enclosing stones of the trapezoidal enclosure (Hünenbett) were raised again.

Flögeln 2 (Passage Grave)

Flögeln 2 lies only about 15 meters away from Flögeln 1. Both sites were excavated in 1882 and 1898. The findings suggest the possible simultaneity of both graves. Despite their position (in a round hill and in a long barrow), in the basic construction they are the same.

The grave lies under a four meter high round mound, with a diameter of 29 meters. The burial chamber measures 5.8 meters in length and has a width of about two meters. It was built from ten support stones, on which five capstones rests. The entrance forms a short passage of two support and two capstones.

Unfortunately the tomb is closed with a gate. According to the information board you can borrow a key at the Museum Burg Bederkesa or at the Tourist Information in Bad Bederkesa.

To get to the tomb, you drive on the road Hohe Luft from Flügeln southwest to Fickmühlen. About halfway on the right hand side you will find the parking lot for the Prehistoric path Flögeln. From here, a short trail (about 120 m) leads sothwest (parallel to the road) first to the tomb Flögeln 2 and then to Flögeln 1.

Visited November 2019

taken from the on-site information board Prehistoric path Flögeln

Megalithic tomb of the Funnel Beaker Culture

The megalithic tomb, built from large boulders, was built during the Neolithic period during the so-called Funnel Beaker Culture (around 4200 - 2800 BC). The burial chamber consists of ten support and five capstones and is 5.8 m long and 2 m wide inside.
To the south there is access in the form of a short passage.

The grave was opened in 1882 by a Leher antiquarian collector. Inside, he found a hatchet, a "spearhead" made of flint, an ax as well as numerous ceramic finds, which are provided with the typical decoration of the pottery of the Funnel Beaker Culture.

The fully preserved chamber lies within a mound. In 1973, the grave was reopened by the archaeological preservation of the district of Cuxhaven and thereby created the funnel-like access. In the filled ground of the mound, remains of sod have been confirmed as building material. In addition, it was possible to prove a circular enclosure of boulders at the foot of the mound. Whether the mound was created with its enclosure at the same time as the central grave or in subsequent epochs, is not clear.

If you would like to enter the burial chamber, you can borrow a key at the Museum Burg Bederkesa or at the Tourist Information in Bad Bederkesa.
Here you have the rare opportunity to visit a fully preserved burial chamber. Inside, pay attention to the gaps between the large support stones filled with small stones. This dry masonry is no longer preserved at the second large stone tomb nearby.

Flögeln 1 (Passage Grave)

The megalithic tomb Flögeln 1 lies only about 15 meters away from Flögeln 2. Both sites were excavated in 1882 and 1898. The findings suggest the possible simultaneity of both graves. Despite their position (in a round hill and in a long barrow), in the basic construction they are the same.

The megalithic tomb was known for a long time and probably served as a "quarry" from the 17th century. The rectangular enclosure was 19 meters long and eight meters wide. Of the dense stones of the enclosure are still 17 available. The chamber has a length of 8.6 meters and is up to 1.7 meters wide. It consists of fourteen supporting and six capstones. Of the capstones four have been preserved, two more are blown up. The two meter long and 0.7 meter wide passage consists of four supporting and two capstones.

To get to the tomb, you drive on the road Hohe Luft from Flügeln southwest to Fickmühlen. About halfway on the right hand side you will find the parking lot for the Prehistoric path Flögeln. From here, a short trail (about 120 m) leads sothwest (parallel to the road) first to the tomb Flögeln 2 and then to Flögeln 1.

Highly recommended!

taken from the on-site information board Prehistoric path Flögeln

Megalithic tomb of the Funnel Beaker Culture

Only a few meters from the megalithic tomb in the round hill lies this second tomb from the Funnel Beaker Culture. 14 supporting stones and 6 capstones form an inside 8.6 m long and 1.7 m wide burial chamber. It is inserted in a 16 m wide and nearly 6 m wide square "bed" made of large boulders. The area between the enclosure and the burial chamber was originally filled with soil. A 2 m long and 0.7 m wide passage provided access to the tomb from the south.
The megalithic tomb served as a quarry in the 19th century. Numerous stones of the enclosure and two of the capstones of the burial chamber were blown up. The same doom happen that time also to some other megalithic tombs in the area.
During excavations in 1898 numerous ceramic fragments of vessels and various stone tools were found in the tomb.

In prehistoric times, these ancient graves were frequently visited and more deceased buried in the mounds. Also in this grave, fragments of urns made of ceramics, cremated remains and a "small roll made of bronze" suggest evidence of burials of the younger Bronze Age (about 1200 - 600 BC).

The present state of the tomb dates back to reconstructions in 1973 in the course of the creation of the prehistoric path.

Munkwolstrup 1 (Long Barrow)

Munkwolstrup 1 lies south of the Munkwolstruper Weg. It is the largest site of the complex. The enclosure is oriented in northwest-southeast direction and has a length of 70 meters. During Sprockhoff's recording in 1934 there were still 6 stones on the northeastern long side, and on the southwestern still 8 stones and one stone of a chamber.

Archaeological research began in 2000, and Arnkiel's excavation results and records showed the original location of the missing stones. Thus, the site could be reconstructed again with boulders from surrounding gravel pits. At the southern end, in contrast to the original state, a passageway was built into the interior of the hunebed and equipped with several information boards. Quite a strange reconstruction! In the hunebed there are two extended dolmens, one on each long side. Below the tomb hook plow traces could be detected, which prove with the help of charcoal found in it, that in this region already 3600 BC agriculture was practiced.

The long barrow is today the largest reconstructed megalithic tomb in Northern Europe and after the long barrow of Karlsminde the second reconstructed monument of this type in Schleswig-Holstein.

Visited November 2019

Munkwolstrup 7 (Long Barrow)

Munkwolstrup 7 lies north of the Munkwolstruper Weg, it is the southernmost of the three tombs lying here.

The enclosure is northwest-southeast oriented and about 46 meters in length and 15.5-17 meters wide. The site is thus considerably wider than the surrounding tombs. The embankement is still relatively well preserved. On the long sides there are still some stones of the enclosure. An excavation in the northern half probably marks the location of a chamber. Another, smaller burial can be found in the southern area.

Visited November 2019

Munkwolstrup 6 (Long Barrow)

Munkwolstrup 6 lies north of the Munkwolstruper Weg, it is the middle of the three tombs lying here.

The enclosure is northwest-southeast oriented and is about 63 meters long and 7 meters wide. The embankment is still relatively well preserved. On the long sides there are still some stones of the enclosure. A deep depression marks the location of the chamber.

Visited November 2019

Munkwolstrup 5 (Long Barrow)

Munkwolstrup 5 is located north of the Munkwolstruper Weg, it is the northernmost of the three tombs lying here.

The enclosure is north-west southeast-oriented and about 31 meters long and 6 meters wide. The embankment is still relatively well preserved. On the long sides and at the northern end there are still some stones of the enclosure. Just south of the center, an hollow marks the location of the chamber.

Visited November 2019

Munkwolstrup 4 (Round Barrow(s))

Munkwolstrup 4 is located south of the Munkwolstruper Weg, just a few meters east of Munkwolstrup 1.

It is a burial mound of 14-16 meters in diameter. In the middle of the mound there is a depression, probably the location of the now destroyed chamber. Only one stone is still preserved here. All the stones have disappeared from the enclosure. During his recording Sprockhoff found two stones of the enclosure in 1934.

Visited November 2019

Munkwolstrup 2 (Long Barrow)

Munkwolstrup 2 is located south of the Munkwolstruper Weg, east of the south end of Munkwolstrup 1.

The enclosure is oriented in a north-east west-southwest direction. The site is quite heavily destroyed, there are only a few stones left at the western end. The original size of the enclosure has been about 30 x 6-7 meters. During Sprockhoff's recording in 1934, more stones of the enclosure were preserved. The chamber, of which there are no more stones left, was in the western half of the hunebed.

Visited November 2019

Munkwolstrup 3 (Long Barrow)

Munkwolstrup 3 is the most southern tomb within the group, about 150 meters south of the southern end of Munkwolstrup 1.

The hunebed is oriented in northeast-southwest direction. The site is quite heavily destroyed, there are only a few stones of the enclosure preserved. The original size of the hunebed has been about 30 x 6 - 7 meters. A burial chamber is no longer recognizable.

Visited November 2019

Munkwolstrup (Megalithic Cemetery)

At Munkwolstrup lies a group of seven megalithic tombs. From the B76, which leads from Flensburg to the south, turn off into the Munkwolstruper Weg. The graves are signposted from here. After about 150 meters you reach the parking lot of Arnkiel Park. It is an archaeological park with an information pavilion to the tombs. North of the Munkwolstruper Weg are three sites, south four. Sprockhoff's numbering does not follow the series from north to south, but begins with the southern group. Here lies also the reconstructed, largest tomb of the group Munkwolstrup 1.

On the grounds are in total 6 long barrows and a burial mound. They all originate from the Funnel Beaker Culture. For a long time, there were only grassy hills covered with grass and bushes, with some curbs at the edges. In the 18th and 19th century almost all the stones of these monuments were removed to be used for road construction, as well as the reconstruction of the village Munkwolstrup, which was almost destroyed by fires around 1788.

The name Arnkiel Park refers to the Danish Probst Magister Trogillo (Troels) Arnkiel, who provided a first description of the graves. So these tombs are the only ones in northern Europe that have credible descriptions from the time before their destruction.

Visited November 2019

Hüsby (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

Hüsby is a rectangular dolmen, a burial type that is very common in Schleswig-Holstein. The original site was located about one kilometer further west. It was examined in 1966 by G. Schäfer. The mound had a diameter of 40 m at a height of 3 m. On the fringe were three stone encircles and a circular ditch. The west-east orientated chamber has a size of 2.1 mx 0.8 m and is 0.9 m high. Of the original 2 capstones, only one is left on which there are 112 small cups.

Ceramics stood on the flint pile: a funnel cup stood in front of the north side. Immediately before the endstone, a funnel cup and the shards of a heavily crushed cup and a bowl were found. Next to the bowl was a battered baking plate.

Today the reconstructed dolmen is located just before the northern village exit of Hüsby on the road Am Ochsenweg, between Klein-Dannewerk and Schuby, on the left (if you drive northward). There is a bus stop right before the tomb, where you can park your car.

Visited November 2019

Nebel 1 (Long Barrow)

The long barrow Nebel 1 is a megalithic tomb consisting of two burial chambers on the North Sea island of Amrum and is part of the Archaeological Area. The long barrow is a rare, rectangular Hunenbed in east-west orientation with two transverse chambers. Although the enclosure consists only of very few stones, a size of about 35 m x 7 m is assumed. The long bed was examined in 1951, while several bones and skulls, flint axes, arrowheads, ornate ceramics and amber beads were discovered as grave goods.

The eastern chamber is an extended dolmen. The long sides consist of two support stones, the northern narrow side of a single support stone. On the southern side there is a half support stone and a 0.35 m high threshold stone. The width of the chamber is 2.5 × 1.4 m. On the chamber lay two capstones, one has been shifted, the other has fallen into the chamber.

The western chamber is similar to the eastern, but a little longer and narrower. The long sides are also formed from two pairs of support stones. The chamber has only one capstone.

Unfortunately, only four stones of a burial chamber are visible, the rest has already disappeared under the dunes.

The grave is next to the reconstruction of an Iron Age house in the Archaeological Area of ??Amrum, northwest of the Vogelkoje Meeram (Vogelkoje means Duck decoy). Boardwalks lead to the right of the Vogelkoje Meeram around a wildlife enclosure first to the Iron Age house and then to the tomb.

Visited November 2019

taken from the on-site information board:

Since the Neolithic there are finds of megalithic tombs on Amrum. This grave site consisted of two burial chambers. The boulders lying in front of you belong to a burial chamber. It was uncovered in the 1950s. The second, which has already disappeared under the dunes today, was already robbed at the time.

Burial chamber 1
In the burial chamber several bones and skulls were discovered, which result from different burials. In addition, flintstone axes, arrowheads, richly ornamented ceramics and amber beads were found as grave goods.

Skull drill of the Stone Age
A skull had a so-called skull trepanning. A medical procedure in which the skullcap is opened with stone blades.

Trepanations were carried out, e.g. to treat skull bruises. Surprisingly, well over 50% of those affected survived the procedure. In this case, the nearly 30-year-old man did not survive the skull injury caused by a stone slash weapon despite surgery.

Nebel - Klöwenhugh (Round Barrow(s))

Between Nebel and Norddorf there are still three burial mounds: Makkanhugh, Kanshugh and Klöwenhugh. Klöwenhugh is probably the most prominent burial mound out of these three.

According to the on-site information board, some excavation did take place, but due to grave robbers and a bungled examination of a teacher and his students only one bronze sword and some cremated human bones are known as grave findings. To make matters worse, the sword was destroyed in 1889 during a house fire.

Klöwenhugh (which means "split burial mound"), lies directly on the L215 between Nebel and Norddorf. There is a parking area on the right with an information board. From here the tomb lies only 100 m north along the L215. Also you can walk to the Vogelkoje Meeram (Vogelkoje means Duck decoy) and the Archaeological Area with the megalithic tomb Nebel 1 from here.

Visited November 2019

taken from the on-site information board:

A Bronze Age grave
The burial mound called Klööwenhuuch is one of about 500 archaeological sites on the island of Amrum. It dates from the Middle Bronze Age (about 1600 to 1300 BC) and contains a main grave and a smaller tomb.

The main grave consisted of a clay-sealed, about 1 x 0.4 x 0.5 m stone cist containing cremated human bones and a double-bladed bronze sword. Above the main grave was a smaller stone cist that also contained cremated bones.

Grave robbers and archaeologists
Most burial mounds on Amrum were robbed long ago. The Klööwenhuuch was first examined in 1880 by the teacher and sexton Bandix Friedrich Bonken together with his students. However, this happened without any archaeological knowledge and methods. Most grave finds were sold, partly to the first Amrumer spa guests.

Only a year later, the Klööwenhuuch was expertly examined by Otto Olshausen. However, at this time all grave goods had disappeared from the burial mound. The bronze sword from the Klööwenhuuch was destroyed in 1889 during a house fire.

Christians and earth spirits
At the time of the introduction of the Reformation in 1522-1524, the burial mound, located exactly between Nebel and Norddorf, was said to have served as a place of gathering for the Protestant community. In addition, some Amrumer myths and legends intertwine around this burial mound. In it, for example, the invisible Onerbäänke (earth spirits) have lived.

Nebel - Kanshugh (Round Barrow(s))

Between Nebel and Norddorf there are still three burial mounds: Klöwenhugh, Makkanhugh and Kanshugh. Unlike Makkanhugh, Kanshugh is still clearly recognizable and and visible from afar.

Unfortunately I couldn't find any information about archaeological findings or excavation on this burial mound.

Kanshugh lies about 750 m north northwest from Makkanhugh on the same track. So take my directions from [[Makkanhugh] and continue on the same track for another 750 m. Kanshugh lies in a field to the left, about 100 m from the track.

Visited November 2019
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During my first trip to Ireland back in 2006, I was bitten by the 'megalithic' bug and since then I seek for every opportunity to visit as much sites as possible, with a bias for stone circles.

As I live in the southwest of Germany (not an area famous for megaliths), I rely on my holidays to be able to visit these sites.

My TMA Content: