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Clashmach Hill (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Having climbed Clashmasch Hill several times looking for the nearby ring cairn and the cairn much further on at Allrick I was always surprised that the cairn near the trig wasn't mentioned in Canmore.

That has now been corrected after the Christmas Day (2019) visit. Some of the stones have been used to erect a walkers cairn next to the trig. The ancient cairn still has at least 4 kerbs in place in a footprint at least 6m wide being 0.4m at its highest.

Tremendous views all round views to the Tap O Noth, Bennachie, Knock and the town of Huntly in the valley below. Unlike the 2017 visit when it was snowy, Christmas 2019 was mild.

Visited 2/1/2017

Re-visited 25/12/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
27th February 2020ce

Dun Garbhlaich (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

As the crow the flies it is 1.5km from Breakachy Cairn to the stunning fort at Dun Garbhlaich, there is a certain amount of 'aye right' at the distance.

The trek from the cairn includes the climbing of several small hills, picking the way through bogs, jumping a fair amount of streams, avoiding falling into peat cutting holes and, today, an ever increasing wind. However the sun remained out till we reached the final climb.

The first view of the fort shows the well preserved walls of the south west, follow the ridge up which leads the southern entrance. As soon as we entered the fort the heavy snow from the west arrived. To the north and south east the wall has tumbled over the edge. However the entrance does remain in place with upright slabs still in place. The forts interior wall to the east is also in a ruinous state. After a good look round in conditions that were atrocious we headed back to the valley below.

After crossing the first marsh the weather relented but not on the fort, it was shrouded in snow. On the hill to the west a row of about 30 deer watched us as we picked our way through the bogs. Eventually we made it back to the track near the Breakachy Cairn, drenched but intact.

We retraced our steps back to Leanassie and the car. Behind was white with snow in the higher places, we'd probably got down just before a complete whiteout.

Another great day in the hills around Beauly, safe bet a few more coming up.

Visited 2/11/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
27th February 2020ce

Breakachy Burn (Kerbed Cairn) — Fieldnotes

After returning to the car we headed west via a few twists and turns ending up at Upper Leanassie where we were allowed to park, even better there is a sign saying walkers welcome.

Follow the track west going through several gates, jumping a couple of streams until the trees finish. Look west and the tremendous Dun Mor can be seen. Unfortunately reaching the fort from this north east point is almost impossible thanks to the Breakachy Burn. However that is a target for another day, looking west we could see the weather had plans for us as well.

The cairn at Breakachy has an impressive kerb consisting of 11 stones to the south west. It is 9m wide and 0.5m high. Sadly the site has been affected by the scourge of depopulation and the remains of a depopulation steading.

Still, despite this, this is a superb site, the views are stunning, across the burn Dun Mor and further west, snow covered mountains. We were going to head North East.

Visited 2/11/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
27th February 2020ce

Dun Fhamhair (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

It is very difficult to find places to park on the minor roads amongst the hills above Beauly. However we eventually parked between Ruisuarie and Drumindorsair. The track heading north, on this day, is a mud bath but leads to the much better forestry track, after jumping a small burn, which leads to the fort after taking the track heading north at the T junction.

As the track veers west head south west cross country to the fort, therefore enter the fort from the north east. The trees are well spaced so access to the fort is relatively, beware of fallen trees.

Stone defences which surround the fort are well covered in turf and heather but must have been impressive as they are well over 3m wide. Some built areas survive especially in the west. No entrance seems clear but facing stones to the south east suggest entry to me. Anybody attacking from from the south east would be sore pushed as it is very, emphasis on very, steep.

So we left the fort via this steep route back to the track. A and B managed perfectly well, whilst I perfected some forward rolls.

Visited 2/11/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
27th February 2020ce

Torhousekie Farm (Cairn(s)) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Torhousekie Farm</b>Posted by markj99<b>Torhousekie Farm</b>Posted by markj99<b>Torhousekie Farm</b>Posted by markj99 Posted by markj99
26th February 2020ce

Torhousekie Farm (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 23.02.20

Torhouskie Farm Cairn lies 200 yards E of the farm. It is in a ruinous state, only the outline of a 25 metre cairn and an earth bank remaining.
Canmore ID 62842 suggests it is a robbed out bell-cairn.
It may be accessed by parking at Torhouse Stone Circle and walking back towards the farm around a quarter of a mile. There is a gate into the adjacent field which provides closer access.
The raised earth bank and intermittent perimeter of stones give a clue as to how impressive this cairn would have been in its youth.
There is a scattering of smaller stones at the centre giving the impression of concentric circles. However, these stones may be a later addition due to field clearance.
Posted by markj99
26th February 2020ce

Wiltshire — Links

Issuu


Scanned version of Sir Richard Colt Hoare's "Ancient History of South Wiltshire" (The Ancient History of Wiltshire volume 1). What a classic! He dug into a lot of barrows (you can hear his enthusiasm. But at least he notes what he found).
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
24th February 2020ce

Torhousekie (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Torhousekie</b>Posted by markj99 Posted by markj99
23rd February 2020ce

St. Peter's Church, Farnborough — Images

<b>St. Peter's Church, Farnborough</b>Posted by Ricky Rocket<b>St. Peter's Church, Farnborough</b>Posted by Ricky Rocket<b>St. Peter's Church, Farnborough</b>Posted by Ricky Rocket<b>St. Peter's Church, Farnborough</b>Posted by Ricky Rocket Posted by Ricky Rocket
22nd February 2020ce

Torhousekie (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Torhousekie</b>Posted by markj99<b>Torhousekie</b>Posted by markj99<b>Torhousekie</b>Posted by markj99 Posted by markj99
21st February 2020ce

Torhousekie (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 20.02.20

On a changeable day with sleet showers I explored the potential cairns to the N of Torhousekie Stone Circle.
There are two candidates listed on Canmore under Torhousekie:
Canmore ID 62839. This was a large cairn 140 yards N of the circle however no trace was found on 18th August 1970. The building of dry stane dykes was blamed for its removal
Canmore ID 62875. This was a large conical cairn, 166 yards N of the circle. It was last observed on 18th August 1970 as "remains of a dilapidated cairn, 28.0m in diameter and 1.0m maximum height. It's top is thickly covered with field clearance stones"
Fifty years have passed since then so we should not be surprised that both cairns are now invisible.
There are many field clearance stones in the corner of the field which bounds the cairn sites and extensive dry stane dykes which would account for their eradication.
Approximately 30 yards E of Canmore ID 62839 there is a small plie of field clearance stones on a natural knoll. At the stated position of Canmore ID 62839 there is a natural knoll with some earth-set rocks but no visible scattered stones.
30 yards N there is an arable grass field next to a farm track. The ploughing of the field has removed any trace of Canmore ID 62875. I have included a picture of the site in case more experienced eyes can spot anything.
Posted by markj99
21st February 2020ce

London Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>London Stone</b>Posted by goffik<b>London Stone</b>Posted by goffik<b>London Stone</b>Posted by goffik<b>London Stone</b>Posted by goffik goffik Posted by goffik
21st February 2020ce

Isle Maree (Sacred Well) — Images

<b>Isle Maree</b>Posted by James Maclennan<b>Isle Maree</b>Posted by James Maclennan Posted by James Maclennan
19th February 2020ce

Mullynavale (Cairn(s)) — Folklore

The Tomb of Bith

From the archaic strata of Irish myth concerning the original settlement of Ireland, as recorded in 'Lebor Gabála', the first man and woman to land were Adra – The Ancient (alias Ladra) – and his sister Cesair, with their father, Bith, together with a number of subordinate women.

Bith traveled north through Ireland from the Munster landing place and then died at Slieve Beagh, on the Ulster mountain named after him. There the "seventeen magnificent maidens" who accompanied him on the journey to the northern province buried him under the mountain-top cairn they constructed, the Carn More or Great Cairn.

The Irish word 'bith' means "cosmos, world, eternity, everlasting, being and existence." Thus his name, his body, and his cairn carry the load of the entire universe. He brings a truly cosmogonic myth to the southern fringe of Ulster.

From "Ireland, A Sacred Journey" by Michael Dames (Element Books 2000), first published as "Mythic Ireland" by Thames and Hudson, 1992.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
19th February 2020ce

News

Neanderthal 'skeleton' is first found in a decade


By Paul Rincon Science editor, BBC News website

Researchers have described the first "articulated" remains of a Neanderthal to be discovered in a decade.

An articulated skeleton is one where the bones are still arranged in their original positions.

The new specimen was uncovered at Shanidar Cave in Iraq and consists of the upper torso and crushed skull of a middle-aged to older adult.

Excavations at Shanidar in the 1950s and 60s unearthed partial remains of 10 Neanderthal men, women and children.

During these earlier excavations, archaeologists found that some of the burials were clustered together, with clumps of pollen surrounding one of the skeletons.

The researcher who led those original investigations, Ralph Solecki from Columbia University in New York, claimed it was evidence that Neanderthals had buried their dead with flowers.

This "flower burial" captured the imagination of the public and kicked off a decades-long controversy. The floral interpretation suggested our evolutionary relatives were capable of cultural sophistication, challenging the view - prevalent at the time - that Neanderthals were unintelligent and animalistic.

More: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-51532781
ryaner Posted by ryaner
18th February 2020ce

Knowth — Images

<b>Knowth</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th February 2020ce

Dowth I (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Dowth I</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th February 2020ce

Newgrange (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Newgrange</b>Posted by Rhiannon<b>Newgrange</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th February 2020ce

Burrow (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Burrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Burrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th February 2020ce

Maeshowe (Chambered Tomb) — Images

<b>Maeshowe</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th February 2020ce

Burrow (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Burrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th February 2020ce

Maeshowe (Chambered Tomb) — Images

<b>Maeshowe</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th February 2020ce

Burrow (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Burrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Burrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th February 2020ce

Maeshowe (Chambered Tomb) — Images

<b>Maeshowe</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th February 2020ce

Burrow (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Burrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Burrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Burrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th February 2020ce

Devil's Quoits (Circle henge) — Fieldnotes

It is still a difficult place to find, there are no signs pointing the way until you are at the small car park. Leaving the B4449 west of Stanton Harcourt head south following signs for the Recycling and waste centre, it is a dead end road, just keep following the road without deviation. As you enter the Recycling centre there will be a small car park immediately left. Use eagle eyes to pick out the small sign saying Devil's Quoits. Follow the path alongside of the big lake with birds on it until the henge and stones appears to your right. Bingo!

I didn't really know what to expect from this place, it's newness, it's fresh out of the box feel could have been overpowering, the landfill site right smack next door to it could have been suffocating. Both of these things are an inescapable part of the Devil's Quoits, but they should not put you off from visiting. People are passing by all the time but they are just folk out for a nice walk by the lake with lots of birds on it, they did not intrude upon my solitary musings.
So I start a walk round the stones, as it happens anti clockwise or widdershins, the first two things one notices about the stones is that some are really quite big and all of them are a lovely Cotswoldy yellow in colour. Other things one notices are some stones are quite small, one stone is outside the circle, pointing in, Clive Ruggles says it has no astronomical function, but the information board ignored him and said it does. One stone near the west entrance is clearly a few feet within the circle.
As I approach the east entrance I go for what I assume is a little trespass, through the earthwork over a not fence and up the landfill hillock with big valves on it. A good view of the entire site can be had from here, though the knowledge of what I'm standing on is a little stomach churning.
Back in the circle I carry on my unfavourable circuit of the stones, one stone a smaller one is strongly grey, standing stark against the yellow/orange of the other stones. I wonder who chose which stones go where and how they settled on this format. Mind you I wonder that at most stone circles, but the mind behind this lot is still alive and approachable.
Back at the entrance I have a quick look at the information board, it is, unsurprisingly, informative.
Either side of the entrance are some large stones that must not have made the cut for some reason but then got left behind, spares? The henge is slowly, or indeed quite quickly being eroded by burrowing rabbits, I have not seen such bunny destruction in a very long time if ever, the cute little darlings should be annihilated without mercy.
All too soon it is time to go, but my time here, was, I felt, well spent.
Upon my return to home I found out that not all the stones were modern replacements, at least three, including one of the big ones are original Devil's Quiots. Strangely (or not) this made me feel a little better about the site.
postman Posted by postman
16th February 2020ce

Burrow (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Burrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th February 2020ce

The Great Circle (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>The Great Circle</b>Posted by Rhiannon Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th February 2020ce

Burrow (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Burrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th February 2020ce

Wart Hill Camp (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Wart Hill Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wart Hill Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wart Hill Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wart Hill Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wart Hill Camp</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
16th February 2020ce
Showing 1-50 of 139,911 posts. Most recent first | Next 50