The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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West Mainland — News

9 possible BA figurines found


Found during work at the Finstown sub-station "A team from ORCA Archaeology, carrying out exploratory excavations at the proposed site of an electrical substation development in Orkney, has unearthed nine, half-metre tall stone-carved objects." https://www.orkney.com/news/finstown-finds plenty of lovely images shown
wideford Posted by wideford
6th December 2019ce

Sievern (Passage Grave) — Fieldnotes

The Bülzenbett is a passage grave with an approximately 8 × 4.7 meter chamber, with internal dimensions of about 2.0 to 2.5 × 6 meters with the three colossal capstones, one of which measures 4 × 3 meters. The middle capstone was blown up between 1604 and 1755, it still has a number of drill holes and is partially fallen into the interior of the chamber. The capstones are resting on nine support stones. A support stone on the southern long side is missing.

The Bülzenbett has a trapezoidal enclosure of about 35 m in length. Of their original 55 stones are still 33 available. Many are still in their original position, some were set up again during the restoration in 1970. They form an easterly rejuvenating trapeze measuring 8.5 by 6.5 by 35.5 meters.

In the middle of the 19th century, a small stone chamber was found within the enclosure, in which a hatchet and a flint dagger were found.

The capstones of the burial chamber of Bülzenbett should be among the largest capstones of all megalithic tombs in Germany. Even the two parts of the blasted middle capstone are still huge! A visit along with the nearby Pipinsburg and a hike on the archaeological trail is not only interesting because of the monuments lying along the way, but also very scenic!

To get to the tomb, take the L135 from Sievern northwards towards Holßel. After 750 m you come to a car park for the Pipinsburg on the right side.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
6th December 2019ce

taken from the on-site information board:

Megatilthic tomb "Bülzenbett"

The Bülzenbett is a megalithic tomb of the Neolithic Funnel Beaker Culture (2nd half 3rd millennium BC). The burial chamber consists of nine support stones (formerly 10) and three capstones.

The middle capstone was blown up and thereby partially fell into the interior of the burial chamber. The still recognizable drill holes indicate that it should be further crushed and then driven off. The date of the damage can be determined relatively accurately: on a copperplate engraving made by Wilhelm Dilich from 1604 the Bülzenbett is shown intact, in 1755 Martin Mushard illustrated the Bülzenbett with the damaged capstone, as can still be seen today.

When the archaeological preservation of the district in the summer of 1970 put the entire complex back in a state worth visiting, the enclosing stones of the trapezoidal enclosure (Hünenbett) were raised again.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
6th December 2019ce

East Yorkshire — News

Iron Age shield found in Pocklington


The remarkably well preserved bronze shield, with a swirling pattern design, formed part of a unique chariot burial, which also contained the upright skeletons of two ponies found on a building site at Pocklington in 2018.

Its owner, a highly regarded member of his community, was in his late 40s or older when he died, between 320BC to 174BC.

He was given a spectacular send-off, with his body placed in the chariot behind the horses, placed to look as if they were leaping out of the grave.


https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/heritage/iron-age-shield-found-in-pocklington-is-one-of-most-important-ancient-finds-this-millennium-1-10137418
moss Posted by moss
5th December 2019ce

Sievern (Passage Grave) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Sievern</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
1st December 2019ce

Flögeln 2 (Passage Grave) — Fieldnotes

Flögeln 2 lies only about 15 meters away from Flögeln 1. Both sites were excavated in 1882 and 1898. The findings suggest the possible simultaneity of both graves. Despite their position (in a round hill and in a long barrow), in the basic construction they are the same.

The grave lies under a four meter high round mound, with a diameter of 29 meters. The burial chamber measures 5.8 meters in length and has a width of about two meters. It was built from ten support stones, on which five capstones rests. The entrance forms a short passage of two support and two capstones.

Unfortunately the tomb is closed with a gate. According to the information board you can borrow a key at the Museum Burg Bederkesa or at the Tourist Information in Bad Bederkesa.

To get to the tomb, you drive on the road Hohe Luft from Flügeln southwest to Fickmühlen. About halfway on the right hand side you will find the parking lot for the Prehistoric path Flögeln. From here, a short trail (about 120 m) leads sothwest (parallel to the road) first to the tomb Flögeln 2 and then to Flögeln 1.

Visited November 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
1st December 2019ce

taken from the on-site information board Prehistoric path Flögeln

Megalithic tomb of the Funnel Beaker Culture

The megalithic tomb, built from large boulders, was built during the Neolithic period during the so-called Funnel Beaker Culture (around 4200 - 2800 BC). The burial chamber consists of ten support and five capstones and is 5.8 m long and 2 m wide inside.
To the south there is access in the form of a short passage.

The grave was opened in 1882 by a Leher antiquarian collector. Inside, he found a hatchet, a "spearhead" made of flint, an ax as well as numerous ceramic finds, which are provided with the typical decoration of the pottery of the Funnel Beaker Culture.

The fully preserved chamber lies within a mound. In 1973, the grave was reopened by the archaeological preservation of the district of Cuxhaven and thereby created the funnel-like access. In the filled ground of the mound, remains of sod have been confirmed as building material. In addition, it was possible to prove a circular enclosure of boulders at the foot of the mound. Whether the mound was created with its enclosure at the same time as the central grave or in subsequent epochs, is not clear.

If you would like to enter the burial chamber, you can borrow a key at the Museum Burg Bederkesa or at the Tourist Information in Bad Bederkesa.
Here you have the rare opportunity to visit a fully preserved burial chamber. Inside, pay attention to the gaps between the large support stones filled with small stones. This dry masonry is no longer preserved at the second large stone tomb nearby.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
1st December 2019ce

Flögeln 1 (Passage Grave) — Fieldnotes

The megalithic tomb Flögeln 1 lies only about 15 meters away from Flögeln 2. Both sites were excavated in 1882 and 1898. The findings suggest the possible simultaneity of both graves. Despite their position (in a round hill and in a long barrow), in the basic construction they are the same.

The megalithic tomb was known for a long time and probably served as a "quarry" from the 17th century. The rectangular enclosure was 19 meters long and eight meters wide. Of the dense stones of the enclosure are still 17 available. The chamber has a length of 8.6 meters and is up to 1.7 meters wide. It consists of fourteen supporting and six capstones. Of the capstones four have been preserved, two more are blown up. The two meter long and 0.7 meter wide passage consists of four supporting and two capstones.

To get to the tomb, you drive on the road Hohe Luft from Flügeln southwest to Fickmühlen. About halfway on the right hand side you will find the parking lot for the Prehistoric path Flögeln. From here, a short trail (about 120 m) leads sothwest (parallel to the road) first to the tomb Flögeln 2 and then to Flögeln 1.

Highly recommended!
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
1st December 2019ce

taken from the on-site information board Prehistoric path Flögeln

Megalithic tomb of the Funnel Beaker Culture

Only a few meters from the megalithic tomb in the round hill lies this second tomb from the Funnel Beaker Culture. 14 supporting stones and 6 capstones form an inside 8.6 m long and 1.7 m wide burial chamber. It is inserted in a 16 m wide and nearly 6 m wide square "bed" made of large boulders. The area between the enclosure and the burial chamber was originally filled with soil. A 2 m long and 0.7 m wide passage provided access to the tomb from the south.
The megalithic tomb served as a quarry in the 19th century. Numerous stones of the enclosure and two of the capstones of the burial chamber were blown up. The same doom happen that time also to some other megalithic tombs in the area.
During excavations in 1898 numerous ceramic fragments of vessels and various stone tools were found in the tomb.

In prehistoric times, these ancient graves were frequently visited and more deceased buried in the mounds. Also in this grave, fragments of urns made of ceramics, cremated remains and a "small roll made of bronze" suggest evidence of burials of the younger Bronze Age (about 1200 - 600 BC).

The present state of the tomb dates back to reconstructions in 1973 in the course of the creation of the prehistoric path.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
1st December 2019ce

Munkwolstrup 1 (Long Barrow) — Fieldnotes

Munkwolstrup 1 lies south of the Munkwolstruper Weg. It is the largest site of the complex. The enclosure is oriented in northwest-southeast direction and has a length of 70 meters. During Sprockhoff's recording in 1934 there were still 6 stones on the northeastern long side, and on the southwestern still 8 stones and one stone of a chamber.

Archaeological research began in 2000, and Arnkiel's excavation results and records showed the original location of the missing stones. Thus, the site could be reconstructed again with boulders from surrounding gravel pits. At the southern end, in contrast to the original state, a passageway was built into the interior of the hunebed and equipped with several information boards. Quite a strange reconstruction! In the hunebed there are two extended dolmens, one on each long side. Below the tomb hook plow traces could be detected, which prove with the help of charcoal found in it, that in this region already 3600 BC agriculture was practiced.

The long barrow is today the largest reconstructed megalithic tomb in Northern Europe and after the long barrow of Karlsminde the second reconstructed monument of this type in Schleswig-Holstein.

Visited November 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
1st December 2019ce

Beinn na Caillich (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Now while there are obviously much, much worse things to endure than a day (or two) of trademark driving Highland rain seemingly intent upon proving Mr Newton wrong - in every conceivable respect - with its sheer gravity-defying persistence, that's not to say the spirit can't flag somewhat under the sustained onslaught. For what it's worth I rely upon one of WS Churchill's idiosyncratic maxims to see me through: 'When you're going through hell, keep going!'... perhaps better expressed in the secular as 'Keep Buggering On'... or, if 'text-speak' acronyms are your thing, 'KBO'.

Suitably inspired, and not subscribing to the warped doublespeak uttered by the democidal Stalinist apologists Orwell warned us would keep on exploiting the credulous to this very day, but rather the knowledge that the universe very much does not revolve around me, I persevere. To greet the following dawn beneath the exquisitely contoured profile of (Broadford's) Beinn na Caillich - instead of in my bed back home - inferring from the swirling cloud base that there might, just might, be an opportunity to correct a forced omission from last year and visit the 'other' Beinn na Caillich. The one overlooking Kylerhea, that is. Although lacking the titanic summit cairn of its gloriously mammarian 2,402ft namesake, this mountain is nevertheless eulogised as the last resting place of Grainnhe, wife of Fionn, whom students of Celtic mythology will recognise as head of the mystical warrior-giant clan The Fiennes.

Yeah, the folkloric pedigree could not really be any higher, could it? Trouble is I baulk at the prospect of the perceived severity of the climb; forewarned is not always forearmed. Hence, and before I can change my mind - yet again - I set off along the A850 toward the mainland, soon enough veering to the right to follow a wondrously single track road descending through Glen Arrochar to eventually terminate at the Kylerhea ferry. Caol Reithe in the vernacular, this little hamlet apparently name-checks another of those behemoths of lore, Mac an Raeidhinn. Suffice to say it would appear the long jump was not his forte. But there you are; neither is it mine. Aside from said ferry plying its summer trade across the water to the glories of Glen Elg, Kylerhea is home to an Otter Sanctuary, the latter serviced by a more than adequate car park. Now, having found I lacked the extra 'oomph' to ascend both Sgurr na Coinnich and Beinn na Caillich from Bealach Udal last year, starting from more-or-less sea level this time around strikes me as being a somewhat nonsensical thing to do. But hey, two rather Germanic-looking ladies 'doing Skye' override the cautionary inner voice... and no doubt 'tweak' those miscellaneous male insecurities a gentleman is obliged not to mention in polite company. 'OK, let's give it a go', I whimper to myself. What could possibly go wrong?

Despite being nowhere near as hot as last year, those extra c1,000ft of ascent - following the tree line to the north-west of Beinn Bhuidhe across a mercilessly rough, trackless terrain - exact a pitiful toll. Furthermore, as if that was not enough, the Allt Grianach and Allt a' Choire Buidhe have carved formidable gulleys into the landscape, isolating Coire Buidhe, as if by defensive design, behind great 'V-sectioned' ditches complete with glacis scarp, although the cascading watercourses do accord the opportunity to replenish an already much-depleted water supply. Really hard going. In retrospect, it might well be a better idea to circle around to the left instead of right... but hindsight is a wondrous thing, is it not? So, rather the worse for wear I eventually reach the high ground beyond and continue northwards, my not-so-cunning plan being to arc around and make the final ascent of Beinn na Caillich from the (hopefully less brutal?) northern flank since, much to my chagrin, the southern appears prohibitively steep to these glazed eyes. Nonetheless, the 2,401ft summit is a long time coming... so much so that I have full empathy with Craig and Charlie when it comes to collapsing at a feminine threshold. Tell me about it, my bespectacled friends.

The sheer breadth of the panoramic vistas to be experienced from Grainnhe's domain is breathtaking. Or at least would be if I had any breath left in me to relinquish. Surrounded on all sides, save the west, by water, it's fair to say aficionados of coastal viewpoints will want to come here. To the north stratocumulus clouds dispense their erratic aqueous content upon Loch Alsh and its environs... however, keeping a measured distance like predatory border collies only too aware of the consequences of losing control, Beinn na Caillich remains inviolate all day. How's that happen, then? Beyond, the undulating, occasionally serrated skyline of Glensheildaig Forest, Applecross and mighty Torridon stretches away to apparent infinity. It is a mesmerising sight, one within which even the artificial construct of the Skye Bridge does not disappoint with its graceful arching span of concrete. Indeed, select any azimuth upon the compass and it is nigh on impossible to find fault, the optic nerve overwhelmed with data at all times. Jeez. Hey, even looking 'inland' - as much as one can upon Skye - the 'other' Beinn na Caillich more than holds its own in foreground profile before a peerless Black Cuillin horizon, the 'Old Man' looking on from Trotternish with apparent detached indifference to the two 'Old Women'. The nomenclature accorded the landscape by us humans suggests a need to grasp the time immemorial - and not let go. The implication of permanence, being overseen, protected by the ancestors upon the heights still; a palpable exigency of the current state of affairs having to reflect the way things have always been, perhaps? A baseline to help make sense of an ever-changing world.... nevertheless, the hills and mountains remain as they were, the cairns still reassuringly gracing the skyline? Or... were they viewed as Lennon's 'folks on the hill'? Something to be feared, but necessary to maintain order?

OK, a viewpoint to last an eternity. But what of Grainnhe's cairn? How does it compare with 'Saucy Sue's' across the way? Simply put, to my mind it doesn't. What could? Although substantial enough to grace many of the summits I've had the pleasure of spending time upon, clearly this cairn would not suffice to represent the last resting place of a giant... even a presumably elegant, feminine one. However, there are, to my mind, more factors in play here than sheer bulk, the volume of stone. Consider: Undertones versus Beethoven? Well, I happen to think the world is a better place for having both the 6th and 'True Confessions'.... not to mention the sublime 'Teenage Kicks'. Multiple, disparate viewpoints approaching the same dilemma from differing angles. Human emotion, why we feel what we feel. And more to the point, what it actually feels like to feel. Perhaps you do, too? It is those emotional sensibilities, the apparent tactility with the landscape suggested by the extreme environmental conditions... the epic physical and mental struggle just to be here.... the feelings associated with - and driven by - where this cairn IS that makes it so special for me. In short, it's the location itself that matters. The primaeval, proto-monument.

As I sit and ponder whatever comes to mind the two 'Germanic' ladies duly arrive by way of the 'prohibitively steep' (ahem) south flank. Funnily enough, one is indeed German, both as blown away as I am. I assist with photographic duties and in due course, they continue toward neighbouring Sgurr na Coinnich. However, having been there, seen that... done it last year I opt to - if not stand on the shoulders of giants - at least hang out in their 'abode' until advancing time insists I begin the descent or face benightment. Now, being well versed in the legendary antics of another of the ginormous brethren, Idris, I reckon I can be forgiven for not wanting to risk the latter option. Mythical or not, it's all in the mind, you see?

I end the day with The Five Sisters of Kintail a resplendent vision in skyline pink, a widescreen Copeian panorama through the windscreen at Bealach Udal. Brutal, uncompromising... yet compellingly beautiful at the same time. The summa of my visit here, perhaps?
GLADMAN Posted by GLADMAN
30th November 2019ce

Munkwolstrup 7 (Long Barrow) — Fieldnotes

Munkwolstrup 7 lies north of the Munkwolstruper Weg, it is the southernmost of the three tombs lying here.

The enclosure is northwest-southeast oriented and about 46 meters in length and 15.5-17 meters wide. The site is thus considerably wider than the surrounding tombs. The embankement is still relatively well preserved. On the long sides there are still some stones of the enclosure. An excavation in the northern half probably marks the location of a chamber. Another, smaller burial can be found in the southern area.

Visited November 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
28th November 2019ce

Munkwolstrup 6 (Long Barrow) — Fieldnotes

Munkwolstrup 6 lies north of the Munkwolstruper Weg, it is the middle of the three tombs lying here.

The enclosure is northwest-southeast oriented and is about 63 meters long and 7 meters wide. The embankment is still relatively well preserved. On the long sides there are still some stones of the enclosure. A deep depression marks the location of the chamber.

Visited November 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
28th November 2019ce

Munkwolstrup 5 (Long Barrow) — Fieldnotes

Munkwolstrup 5 is located north of the Munkwolstruper Weg, it is the northernmost of the three tombs lying here.

The enclosure is north-west southeast-oriented and about 31 meters long and 6 meters wide. The embankment is still relatively well preserved. On the long sides and at the northern end there are still some stones of the enclosure. Just south of the center, an hollow marks the location of the chamber.

Visited November 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
28th November 2019ce

Munkwolstrup 4 (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

Munkwolstrup 4 is located south of the Munkwolstruper Weg, just a few meters east of Munkwolstrup 1.

It is a burial mound of 14-16 meters in diameter. In the middle of the mound there is a depression, probably the location of the now destroyed chamber. Only one stone is still preserved here. All the stones have disappeared from the enclosure. During his recording Sprockhoff found two stones of the enclosure in 1934.

Visited November 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
28th November 2019ce

Munkwolstrup 2 (Long Barrow) — Fieldnotes

Munkwolstrup 2 is located south of the Munkwolstruper Weg, east of the south end of Munkwolstrup 1.

The enclosure is oriented in a north-east west-southwest direction. The site is quite heavily destroyed, there are only a few stones left at the western end. The original size of the enclosure has been about 30 x 6-7 meters. During Sprockhoff's recording in 1934, more stones of the enclosure were preserved. The chamber, of which there are no more stones left, was in the western half of the hunebed.

Visited November 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
28th November 2019ce

Avebury & the Marlborough Downs (Region) — Miscellaneous

I recently came across a collection of essays about Wiltshire by John Chandler called The Day Returns - Excursions in Wiltshire's History (published 1998). This one is from a previous publication called 'Life in the Bus Lane'. The bus in question no longer runs on the route described.

The Source of the Kennet
It is a crisp March Monday and we are sitting on a bus in Marlborough High Street facing the college, and waiting for 9.35. It is that time in the morning which is common to all small towns, when those who have to be there have arrived and are at work; those who don’t aren’t, or if they, they can still drift along the capacious street to find a parking space.
While we are waiting I should tell you one thing that any intending bus passenger must understand. Buses (and I mean the ordinary country buses which we all used before we bought cars) – buses like this do not take you from A to B. They take you from A to Z, via B, C and D, not to mention W, X, and Y. This bus may say it is going to Swindon, if we persevere with it and have plenty of time. But Swindon is merely a by-product of the journey.
Let’s face it. If anyone is desperate to go from Marlborough to Swindon and they have a car, they will be there in 15 minutes. This bus takes over an hour. And one reason for the discrepancy becomes apparent as soon as we set off. We are going the wrong way! Swindon is due north and we are heading west. We are, in fact, embarking on a trip to the source of the Kennet, and on the way we shall call on most of the sixteen villages which grew up alongside the meagre waters of its upper reaches.
First above Marlborough is Preshute, its church hiding beyond the trees of the college. But Preshute is really part of Marlborough. The first real upper Kennet village is Manton, and here we leave the main road to make acquaintance with the river itself. It is lively here, eager to resume its old job of splashing over the millwheel, a teeming artery of winter rain surging bankful among its meadows.
In front of us are some six miles of Kennet valley and seven more villages before we reach Avebury. We cross and re-cross the river to visit them all. This is the land of the sarsens, the alien stones, the Saracens. At Piggledene and Lockeridge Dene they masquerade as drab sheep and lie asleep in flocks. From West Kennet to Avebury they march along upright like soldiers. In the villages they have been tamed and squared to serve as walls - incomparable walls of mottled silver, pink, and greenish-grey. And in Fyfield churchyard lie the men of the Free family, who tamed them and squared them, and who died prematurely from their dust.
The bus climbs from Lockeridge to West Overton, and at the crest of the hill a fine view is revealed. In the foreground Overton church, dressed in sarsen, looks down on a field of village earthworks. To our left the view is to Tan Hill, the highest place in Wiltshire; to our right the barrows on Overton Hill mark the line of the Great Ridgeway. And between them, in the far distance, we glimpse the Lansdowne monument above Cherhill. The bus winds down into Overton, slowing for an old border collie who is sauntering deafly along the road.
Now to East Kennet, where I have often admired the sarsen garden walls. But only from upstairs on the bus is their secret revealed, that behind them is hidden a swimming pool. On sultry summer afternoons, I daydream, some bronzed bodies laze by the water, and reach discreetly for their towels when the double decker trundles by. But no time now for daydreaming. The Kennet’s proudest moment is about to be revealed. We are back on the main road and approaching Silbury Hill. After a wet February the river has collected every drop it can muster from its downland springs and streams, to form a silver moat around the hill. It is a spectacle purely for the locals which the Kennet never repeats for the summer tourist trade.
At Beckhampton Roundabout we must give up this self-indulgence, and do our duty at last and go to Swindon. The northward turn up to Avebury Trusloe is surprisingly hard work for a bus. I glance across to Adam and Eve, the two solitary sarsens behind the stables. But I am thinking of breakfast. I heard a man interviewed on the radio, a manufacturer I think, about marmalade. He was talking about customer’s preferences. “Thick cut marmalade”, he said, as if had just thought of it, “Is essentially a male preserve.”
Avebury’s present appearance owes a great deal to marmalade – far more than it owes to the National Trust. It was Scottish marmalade that enabled Alexander Keiller, heir to family business to indulge a passion for archaeological excavation, first in the twenties at Windmill Hill nearby, and then during the thirties in Avebury itself. He drew on his wealth to buy much of the village and as building within the circle became vacant he demolished them, displacing the villagers to new house at Avebury Trusloe. He excavated the ditch, re-erected the fallen stones, and established a museum which still exists. He died in 1955.
Beyond Avebury we settle into a different landscape. The bus is heading north now, so the Marlborough Downs are to our right. They have formed themselves into a steep escarpment which rises green to sky. Here and there ribbons of white climb the hill, remnants in sunless holloways of last week’s snow. Against the snow the grubby chalk horse on Hackpen is a miserable creature. To our left now there is no corresponding hillside, just undulating farmland which teeters to the edge of a second escarpment unseen from here, then suddenly down to the clay. Above Silbury the Kennet loses its vigour and has not the strength to form a valley. It has become seasonal, gratefully receiving whatever normally dry tributaries can offer, and flowing only after winter rain – a true winterbourne.

John Chandler ends his passage (which I haven't reproduced in its entirety) with a quote from Richard Jefferies’ book ‘The Story of my Heart’ and the observation “Such a man would never have understood a bus timetable.”

‘It is eternity now. I am in the midst of it. It is about me in the sunshine; I am in it, as the butterfly floats in the light laden air. Nothing has to come; it is now. Now is eternity; now is the immortal life …. For artificial purpose time is mutually agreed on, but there is really no such thing. The shadow goes on upon the dial. The index moves round upon the clock, and what is the difference, none whatever. If the clock had been never set going, what would have been the difference? There may be time for the clock, the clock may make time for itself: there is none for me' (Richard Jefferies)
tjj Posted by tjj
26th November 2019ce

Castallack (Cup Marked Stone) — Images

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24th November 2019ce

The Pipers (Boleigh) (Standing Stones) — Images

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24th November 2019ce

The Merry Maidens (Stone Circle) — Images

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24th November 2019ce

Tregiffian (Entrance Grave) — Images

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24th November 2019ce

Gun Rith Menhir (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

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24th November 2019ce

Boscawen-Ros (Standing Stones) — Images

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24th November 2019ce

Munkwolstrup 3 (Long Barrow) — Fieldnotes

Munkwolstrup 3 is the most southern tomb within the group, about 150 meters south of the southern end of Munkwolstrup 1.

The hunebed is oriented in northeast-southwest direction. The site is quite heavily destroyed, there are only a few stones of the enclosure preserved. The original size of the hunebed has been about 30 x 6 - 7 meters. A burial chamber is no longer recognizable.

Visited November 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
24th November 2019ce
Edited 28th November 2019ce

Munkwolstrup (Megalithic Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

At Munkwolstrup lies a group of seven megalithic tombs. From the B76, which leads from Flensburg to the south, turn off into the Munkwolstruper Weg. The graves are signposted from here. After about 150 meters you reach the parking lot of Arnkiel Park. It is an archaeological park with an information pavilion to the tombs. North of the Munkwolstruper Weg are three sites, south four. Sprockhoff's numbering does not follow the series from north to south, but begins with the southern group. Here lies also the reconstructed, largest tomb of the group Munkwolstrup 1.

On the grounds are in total 6 long barrows and a burial mound. They all originate from the Funnel Beaker Culture. For a long time, there were only grassy hills covered with grass and bushes, with some curbs at the edges. In the 18th and 19th century almost all the stones of these monuments were removed to be used for road construction, as well as the reconstruction of the village Munkwolstrup, which was almost destroyed by fires around 1788.

The name Arnkiel Park refers to the Danish Probst Magister Trogillo (Troels) Arnkiel, who provided a first description of the graves. So these tombs are the only ones in northern Europe that have credible descriptions from the time before their destruction.

Visited November 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
24th November 2019ce
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