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Ness of Brodgar (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork)

Ness 2020 Cancelled


full info here
https://www.nessofbrodgar.co.uk/ness-2020-excavation-cancelled/?fbclid=IwAR21Y2WxDGKZrpId5LfrI_7lGRvTCJapnPvlU_1ihZkCCe03Kc-oQKbpfb4
wideford Posted by wideford
20th March 2020ce

Stonehenge and its Environs

Stonehenge A303 tunnel given go ahead by chancellor


Plans to dig a two-mile (3.2km) road tunnel near Stonehenge have been given the go ahead by the chancellor.

The A303, which often suffers from severe congestion, currently passes within a few hundred metres of the ancient monument.

The plan is to build a dual carriageway alternative out of sight of the World Heritage site but it is opposed by some archaeologists and environmentalists.

Rishi Sunak told the commons: "This government's going to get it done."

More: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-wiltshire-51838402
ryaner Posted by ryaner
12th March 2020ce

Avebury & the Marlborough Downs (Region)

Avebury byways becoming impassable ...


... Rogue 4x4 drivers are blamed.

https://www.gazetteandherald.co.uk/news/18287094.avebury-byways-becoming-impassable-rogue-4x4-drivers-blamed/?ref=fbshr&fbclid=IwAR2CVZyr_8DWkTnWjz7cEzCyM2AnhksJfRSpOKjSJ3VeZHrRtlSUJl1sNyY

AVEBURY is leading the charge to get damaged byways fixed and protected.
Routes around the village, and the nearby ancient historic site of Windmill Hill are now so badly damaged that they have become impassable.
Rogue 4 x 4 enthusiasts - some who travel from as far afield as Germany to drive some of Wiltshire's 695km of by ways - are being blamed for the damage.
The campaign is being supported by the countryside charity CPRE. Anne Henshaw, the Wiltshire representative said:

"I am trying to form a charity/community not for profit group of parishes and other interested parties to set up something similar to the Cotswold Warden scheme," she said.
This could see some of the byways closed to traffic at certain times of the year to protect them from heavy traffic use.
Stephen Stacey, chairman of Avebury Parish Council said:
"These by ways are for everyone's use, but the actions of a few selfish people have made them inaccessible.
"We would like interested parties like ramblers, horse and bike riders and other local authorities to work together, and perhaps work with Wiltshire Council to see if we can come up with a solution between us."
Some of the byways are so badly damaged that tree roots are exposed, and the ruts are more than two feet deep in places.
Solutions, he said, could include a volunteer force using council equipment and materials to make repairs as he says cut backs at Wiltshire Council are to blame for the disrepair.
Contd.
tjj Posted by tjj
7th March 2020ce

Chauvet Cave (Cave / Rock Shelter)

Meet Our Ancestors


Chauvet Cave: a 36,000-year-old art gallery, normally closed to the public, opens to everyone through immersive tech

More: https://artsandculture.google.com/project/chauvet-cave
ryaner Posted by ryaner
4th March 2020ce

Shropshire

British Museum acquires 3,000-year-old Shropshire sun pendant


Gold bulla is described as one of the most important bronze age finds of the last century

The British Museum has acquired a shimmering 3,000-year-old gold sun pendant heralded as one of the most important bronze age finds of the last century.

The astonishingly well-preserved pendant, or bulla, was discovered by a metal detector enthusiast in Shropshire in 2018.

Neil Wilkin, the museum’s bronze age curator, recalled dropping everything when he first saw it. “I was absolutely flabbergasted, I couldn’t believe my eyes,” he said. “To me it is the most important object from this period, the first age of metal, that has come up in about 100 years.”

The pendant has been purchased for £250,000 using money from the Art Fund and the American Friends of the British Museum.

More: https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2020/mar/04/british-museum-acquires-3000-year-old-shropshire-sun-pendant
ryaner Posted by ryaner
4th March 2020ce

News

Neanderthal 'skeleton' is first found in a decade


By Paul Rincon Science editor, BBC News website

Researchers have described the first "articulated" remains of a Neanderthal to be discovered in a decade.

An articulated skeleton is one where the bones are still arranged in their original positions.

The new specimen was uncovered at Shanidar Cave in Iraq and consists of the upper torso and crushed skull of a middle-aged to older adult.

Excavations at Shanidar in the 1950s and 60s unearthed partial remains of 10 Neanderthal men, women and children.

During these earlier excavations, archaeologists found that some of the burials were clustered together, with clumps of pollen surrounding one of the skeletons.

The researcher who led those original investigations, Ralph Solecki from Columbia University in New York, claimed it was evidence that Neanderthals had buried their dead with flowers.

This "flower burial" captured the imagination of the public and kicked off a decades-long controversy. The floral interpretation suggested our evolutionary relatives were capable of cultural sophistication, challenging the view - prevalent at the time - that Neanderthals were unintelligent and animalistic.

More: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-51532781
ryaner Posted by ryaner
18th February 2020ce

London

Mudlarker unearths a Neolithic skull on the banks of the River Thames


Martin Bushell spotted the 5,600-year-old skull fragment digging in the muddy banks of the Thames

A human skull from the Neolithic era has been put on display at the Museum of London.

But the incredibly rare specimen wasn't found in some elaborate archaeological dig. The skull was unearthed by a sharp-eyed mudlarker strolling the banks of the River Thames.

"When I first saw it, I thought it was a pot that might have been upside down — like a ceramic pot," Martin Bushell told As It Happens host Carol Off. "It looked more like a crab shell."

Mudlarkers are amateur archeologists who scour the banks of the Thames at low tide for treasure and historic artifacts. The tradition dates back to the Victorian era.

More: https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-it-happens-thursday-edition-1.5028070/british-mudlarker-unearths-a-neolithic-skull-on-the-banks-of-the-river-thames-1.5028073
ryaner Posted by ryaner
4th February 2020ce

Jersey

Jersey ‘drowned landscape’ could yield Ice Age insights


Archaeologists are planning an ambitious survey of part of the seabed off Jersey where Neanderthals once lived.

The site is part-exposed during spring low tide, giving the team a four-hour window to dig while the sea is out.

Stone tools and mammoth remains have been recovered from the Violet Bank over the years.

More: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-51299755
ryaner Posted by ryaner
30th January 2020ce

Star Carr (Mesolithic site)

Making a 'Star Carr' Mesolithic type shale pendant - Event in Stockport


"In this second session we will be looking at the Mesolithic period and making a 'Star Carr' type shale pendant. The Mesolithic is the period when people repopulated Britain after the last major Ice Age event. "

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/making-a-mesolithic-star-carr-type-pendant-tickets-80688061163
amd Posted by amd
28th January 2020ce

Mulfra Quoit (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

Mulfra Quoit vandalised with painting of aliens


https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/gallery/anger-aliens-appear-ancient-site-3717447.amp
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
10th January 2020ce
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