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<b>Northern England</b>Posted by fitzcoraldoImage © fitzcoraldo
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<b>Northern England</b>Posted by fitzcoraldo

Latest posts for Northern England

Showing 1-10 of 17,103 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Lincolnshire and Humberside — News

Archaeologists unearth massive 5,000-year-old structure near Lincoln industrial estate


Archaeologists from Network Archaeology Ltd have teamed up with Lincolnshire Live to reveal more about the incredible artefacts from a dig along part of the route of Lincoln's Eastern Bypass


http://www.lincolnshirelive.co.uk/news/local-news/archaeologists-unearth-massive-5000-year-603713.amp
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
13th October 2017ce

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Links

Cursuses relating to the Rudston Monolith


The Rudston cursus group consists of four cursuses stretching along the bottom and sides of the Great Wold Valley. At least one end of each of the monument are to be found on the elevated chalk ridges which surround Rudston. The valley contains the Gypsey Race, one of the rare streams across the chalklands, and two of the cursuses (A and C) cross this stream. The Rudston group contains an unparalleled concentration of cursus monuments. Cursus A is the southern most of the group. The southern end of the cursus survives as an earthwork and the remainder is visible on air photographs as two parallel ditches. The cursus is 2700 metres long by circa 58 metres, it tapers to 41 metres at the south terminal. Cursus A is the only one of the group where both ends are visible, both of the terminals are square in plan. The earthwork was excavated in the mid 19th century by Greenwell and showed what appeared to be a round barrow raised upon the surface of a long mound. This excavation produced six burials (two with Beakers), only one of which Greenwell considered to be primary, and a considerable amount of pottery. These burials were inserted into the south end of the cursus monument in the early bronze age. Greenwell also found sherds of earlier Neolithic pottery, along with worked flint and animal bones on the ground surface beneath the bank of the cursus. A second excavation across the west ditch in 1958 recovered 24 small pieces of Beaker pottery from the bottom 18 inches of the ditch fill, excluding the primary fill, and 4 larger pieces from the primary fill. There is evidence to suggest that the ditch was recut at this point explaining the presence of the later pottery.
moss Posted by moss
30th September 2017ce

Beacon Cursus — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Beacon Cursus</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Rudston Monolith</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce

Rudston Monolith (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

25/09/2017 – We had popped down to Scarborough for a long weekend just for a bit of walking really. A few days before we came I noticed that we weren’t too far from Rudston so we crammed 3 days of walking into 2, leaving our last day free for a visit to this mega monolith.

Easy enough to get to by car but we were on the bus, which still wasn’t too tricky. Morning 121 bus from Scarborough to Burton Agnes and then a 3 mile or so walk down quietish country roads to Rudston.

We arrived at the south side of the church and had a little debate as to which way round the church we wanted to go for our first sight of the stone. These things are important I think, it’s not every day you get to see the tallest standing stone in Britain for the first time. We chose clockwise.

Rounding the corner of the building and there it stood in all its glory. It really is impressive and as wonderful as I hoped it would be. It seemed to grow and grow as we edged closer. It was hard not to just keep staring at it. So solid and timeless. I know the church and graveyard setting isn’t everyone’s cup of tea but I quite liked it and loved the difference in height between the monolith and the similar shaped gravestones round it.

After having a look at the small stone and cist in the corner (it looked a little sad hidden away and dark with the overhead leaves at this time of year) we sat across the road on a bench and had our butties.

The inside of the church is worth a look and has a small display about the history of the area.

After one last look at the stone we started the slow walk back to the bus stop. We kept an eye out for any sign of the cursus that crosses the road to the south of Rudston but no luck. Did manage to find a coffee shop in Burton Agnes which helped with the wait for the bus.

Top day out and the Rudston monolith is a must see site.

Happy us on the bus back to Scarborough for an evening of chips and gravy and two penny falls.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce
Edited 2nd October 2017ce

Seamer Beacon (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Seamer Beacon</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce

Seamer Beacon (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

24/09/2017 – I liked this one. Not really much to see but the walk up from Scarborough is nice and the top very green with a good clump of trees hiding the beacon. Worth going for a little leg stretch. Nice views and the access is fine.

If you are in the area it’s worth popping by the Rotunda Museum near the sea front. Nice display of objects from Star Carr and Bronze age Gristhorpe Man with his fantastic tree trunk burial.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
29th September 2017ce

High Woof Howe (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>High Woof Howe</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
28th September 2017ce

Louven Howe (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Louven Howe</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
28th September 2017ce

Louven Howe (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

23/09/2017 - X93 bus out from Scarborough to the Falcon Inn on the A171 to start a nice loop of three hills - Brow Moor, Stony Leas & Barns Cliff End. Long day and it was dark by the time we caught the bus back.

Good track to start through the trees and then out to the moor to make the small climb to the trig on Brow Moor. Even though it was still early in the day I knew already we just didn't have the time to look round this area for cup marked rocks which was a bit sad. We pushed on and headed west.

The walk between Brow Moor trigpoint and Louven Howe on the top of Stony Leas was easy going but felt long. The crossing of Jugger Howe Beck was nice and Burn Howe was worth a look. It did feel good to finally make it to Louven Howe for a sit and a brew.

There's plenty of round barrows around here and from the ones we saw, they all looked pretty much of a muchness. If you want to visit one or two, this and Lilla Howe make for a nice walk from a few directions. I don't think this would be the best place to visit in rubbish weather though.

Louven Howe has a large hole in it, I couldn't make my mind up about it. Bit odd.

After a stop to rest and take in the views, which are good, we headed south to enter the trees and make the long walk back to the A171 via Barns Cliff End.

Nice day out but couldn't quite fit in everything we wanted to see.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
28th September 2017ce
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