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Castle Hill (Huddersfield) (Hillfort) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Castle Hill (Huddersfield)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Castle Hill (Huddersfield)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
12th August 2018ce

Star Carr (Mesolithic site) — Links

White Rose University Press


Marvellously, you can read online or download for free, two brand new books about the site that analyse Chantel Conneller, Nicky Milner and Barry Taylor's excavations between 2003-15.

Volume one is called 'A persistent place in a changing world' and the second is 'Studies in technology, subsistence and environment'.

The site was occupied / used for about 800 years. The first people there deposited worked wood, articulated animal bone and flint tools into the lake. The next period was the main phase of occupation, in which large timber platforms were made at the lake's edge, and items were still being deposited into it. And in the last phase both the dry land and the wetland margins were still being used, "often for craft activities," and making axes and tools - and the oldest known British Mesolithic art - a shale bead - was found there. I love a shale bead, me. They're in chapter 33 of the second volume. The famous antler frontlets are in chapter 26.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
7th June 2018ce

Staffordshire — News

Leekfrith Torcs go on permanent display at museum.


Pieces of ancient jewellery discovered in a North Staffordshire field by two metal detector enthusiasts have gone on permanent display at Stoke-on-Trent's Potteries Museum and Art Gallery following a successful £325,000 fund-raising campaign to buy them.

Pals, Mark Hambleton and Joe Kania hit the headlines in December 2016 when they returned to a field near the Staffordshire Moorlands village of Rudyard some 20 years after failing to detect anything there and discovered the artefacts which are thought to be among the earliest examples of Iron Age gold ever found in Britain. The jewellery was declared treasure at an inquest in 2017, prompting the launch of a fundraising campaign by Stoke-on-Trent City Council in partnership with the museum's Friends group to buy the objects for the Potteries Museum and pay for expert restoration work.

More than 21,000 people viewed the Leekfrith Iron Age Torcs when they went on temporary display at the Potteries Museum & Art Gallery in February 2017 with members of the public donating thousands of pounds to the fundraising campaign. A grant of £80,000 from The Art Fund gave efforts a boost then, as the deadline to raise the funds to buy the precious ancient jewellery approached, a grant of up to £165,000 from the National Heritage Memorial Fund ensured that not only could the torcs be purchased but also ongoing research could be carried out.

Link to article in The Sentinel newspaper 28/05/18.
https://www.stokesentinel.co.uk/news/stoke-on-trent-news/ancient-treasure-bought-325k-finds-1609312
BrownEdger Posted by BrownEdger
28th May 2018ce

Thornborough Henge North — Images

<b>Thornborough Henge North</b>Posted by postman<b>Thornborough Henge North</b>Posted by postman<b>Thornborough Henge North</b>Posted by postman<b>Thornborough Henge North</b>Posted by postman<b>Thornborough Henge North</b>Posted by postman<b>Thornborough Henge North</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
7th May 2018ce
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