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The Western Isles

<b>The Western Isles</b>Posted by shacmhCallanish © cole henley
Also known as:
  • Na h-Eileanan Siar
  • Outer Hebrides

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Sites/Groups in this region:

16 sites
Barra
5 posts
92 sites
Lewis and Harris
4 posts
10 sites
St. Kilda

Folklore

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In his book ‘Behold the Hebrides’, Alastair Alpin MacGregor (1925) explains how the people of the Hebrides are surrounded by the sea and it though the sea is part of them and they are part of the sea. He says it was known as well as though it were a member of their own family and that to them the sea spoke in Gaelic. He says they listened to what it said and from this they prophesied good and bad fortune, at home and abroad, and how by its sounds and moods they could tell what weather was coming. There was the ‘laughing of the waves’ – ‘gair nann tonn / gair na mara’ and sometimes this laughter would be mocking and derisive when a storm had risked life and feeble humans had struggled to survive it. He also describes the laughing of waves across a great stretch of sand on Lewis in calm and frosty weather as being “weird and eerie”.
In the Hebrides there are many descriptions of the sounds and moods of the sea. Here are a few of them.
Nualan na mara – sounds like the lowing of cattle
Buaireas na mara – restless sea
Gearan na mara – complaining or fretting sea
Mire na mara – joy and cheerfulness of sea
Osnadh – sighing of sea, like the breeze through pine and larch at nightfall
Caoidh na mara – lament of the sea.

He says that sometimes the sea is totally still and silent as though it sleeps, and the people nearby are lulled into sleep also; and he says that people who live by the sea derive their vision from it.

Martin Martin, writing of the Western Isles in 1695 says of the inhabitants of one of the small, then inhabited, islands round Lewis, that they took their surname from the colour of the sky, the rainbow and the clouds.

Source: ‘Mother of the Isles’ by Jill Smith
tjj Posted by tjj
22nd July 2013ce
Edited 22nd July 2013ce

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The Hebridean Iron Age: Twenty Years' Research


By D.W. Harding:

This paper reviews progress in Atlantic Scottish Iron Age studies over the past twenty years, with particular reference to a long-term programme of fieldwork in west Lewis undertaken by the University of Edinburgh. It deprecates the survival and revival of older conventional models for defining and dating the major field monuments of the period and region in the face of accumulating evidence for the origins of Atlantic roundhouses in the mid-first millennium BC, and discusses important new evidence for the first-millennium AD sequence of occupation and material culture. The material assemblages of the Hebridean Iron Age are contrasted with the impoverished and relatively aceramic material culture of lowland Scotland and northern England, and the importance of the western seaways in later prehistoric and early historic times as a distinctive cultural region is emphasised.
Hob Posted by Hob
19th September 2005ce
Edited 30th August 2007ce

Latest posts for the Western Isles

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Balnacraig (Chambered Cairn) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Balnacraig</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Balnacraig</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Balnacraig</b>Posted by thelonious<b>Balnacraig</b>Posted by thelonious thelonious Posted by thelonious
22nd August 2017ce

Balnacraig (Chambered Cairn) — Fieldnotes

8/08/2017 – Before the start of our trip I was hoping for just one good weather day for this walk amongst the hills and stones in the middle of Barra. It had been raining on and off the first two days but the forecast looked great for today so off we went.

Starting from Castlebay, we headed NE up the road to the high point and then climbed up to Heabhal (bit of a slog). Then up and down a few minor tops to make the steep descent to Beul a’ Bhealaich, where a lovely standing stone (now fallen) is positioned at the top of the pass. From here we climbed Grianan (Good views and a fine place for a brew). After a rest, we went NW to visit Tigh Talamhanta aisled house and then SW to the wonderful Dun Bharpa chambered cairn. A brief diversion to the top of Beinn Mhartainn (nice top) and then back past Dun Bharpa to Balnacraig chambered cairn. There's a small cairn marked on the OS 1:25000 south of Dun Bharpa but it’s not that exciting.

Tired by the time we reached the last cairn but the sun was still shinning and the stones of Balnacraig looked so nice against the sunlit hills behind. Hard to make out the original shape but I think I could see where the chamber stood. Well worth a visit along with the excellent Dun Bharpa.

We headed west down the track to the main road to start a slow plod back to Castlebay. Very good day out.
thelonious Posted by thelonious
22nd August 2017ce

Village Bay (Burnt Mound / Fulacht Fia) — Images

<b>Village Bay</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Village Bay</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd August 2017ce

Village Bay (Cist) — Images

<b>Village Bay</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Village Bay</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd August 2017ce

Tobar Childa (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Tobar Childa</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd August 2017ce
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