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St. Kilda

<b>St. Kilda</b>Posted by drewbhoyBioda Mor © drew/A
Nearest Town:Uig (135km E)
OS Ref (GB):   NF999500
Latitude:57° 48' 49.55" N
Longitude:   8° 35' 9.62" W

Added by Paulus

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Sites in this group:

1 post
Amazon's House Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
5 posts
Aoismheal (Oiseval) Souterrain
14 posts
Bioda Mor Stone Fort / Dun
8 posts
Clash Na Bearnaich Ancient Mine / Quarry
11 posts
House Of The Fairies Souterrain
7 posts
Lover's Stone Natural Rock Feature
7 posts
The Milking Stone Natural Rock Feature
2 posts
The Mistress Stone Natural Rock Feature
15 posts
Tobar Childa Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
3 posts
1 site
Village Bay Cist

News

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Prehistoric finds on remote St Kilda's Boreray isle


The remains of a permanent settlement which could date back to the Iron Age has been uncovered on a remote Scottish island, according to archaeologists.

It was previously thought Boreray in the St Kilda archipelago was only visited by islanders to hunt seabirds and gather wool from sheep... continues...
1speed Posted by 1speed
17th June 2011ce

Folklore

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Apparently the native people of St Kilda had developed a genetically inherited elongated big toe that let the men cling more easily to the cracks in the rocks. On one side of the island is the Mistress Stone where marriageable men had to balance on one leg - on the edge of a 300 ft drop - to prove their agility on the rocks and their ability to support a family.

Source: "West Coast" by Kate Muir
tjj Posted by tjj
6th September 2012ce

Links

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Lost songs of St. Kilda


Nearly a century ago, the last 36 residents were evacuated from the most remote part of the British Isles, St Kilda, an isolated archipelago off the beautiful and rugged western coast of Scotland.

After 86 years, the music of St Kilda has been discovered, recorded in a Scottish care home by Trevor Morrison, an elderly man who was taught piano by an inhabitant of St Kilda. Heard by the outside world for the first time these haunting melodies offer a last link to the so-called 'island on the edge of the world'.

Welcome to the incredible story of the lost songs of St Kilda.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
3rd October 2016ce
Edited 4th October 2016ce

RCAHMS


The St Kilda Survey Project.

Very good and informative this. Also about various prehistory and a nice photo of the souterrain.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
24th August 2012ce

Latest posts for St. Kilda

Showing 1-10 of 76 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Tobar Childa (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Folklore

Tobair na h-oige

An old story told in previous centuries by the indigenous folk of Hirta (St. Kilda) described a long-lost well that was thought to be an abode of the little people, known as the Well of Eternal Youth. Not to be confused with the Well of Virtues near the Amazon’s House less than a mile west, the rough whereabouts of this site is cited by J. Sands (1878) in the folklore section of his otherwise historical account on these faraway Atlantic islands. He wrote:

“Once on a time an old fellow, in going up Connagher with a sheep on his back, observed a Well which he had never seen or heard of before. The water looked like cream, and was so tempting, that he knelt down and took a hearty drink. To his surprise all the infirmities of age immediately left him, and all the vigour and activity of youth returned. He laid down the sheep to mark the spot, and ran down the hill to tell his neighbours. But when he came up again neither sheep nor well were to be found, nor has any one been able to find the Tobair na h-oige to this day. Some say that if he had left a small bit of iron at the well—a brog with a tacket in it would have done quite well—the fairies would have been unable to take back their gift.”

Mrs Banks’ Scottish Calendar Customs (1937)

A nearby but long vanished sacred well.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
25th September 2017ce

Bioda Mor (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Bioda Mor</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
25th September 2017ce

House Of The Fairies (Souterrain) — Images

<b>House Of The Fairies</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
25th September 2017ce

Tobar Childa (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Tobar Childa</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
25th September 2017ce

Clash Na Bearnaich (Ancient Mine / Quarry) — Images

<b>Clash Na Bearnaich</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Clash Na Bearnaich</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Clash Na Bearnaich</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
25th September 2017ce

The Mistress Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Folklore

A group of tourists explore the 'Mistress Stone' at Ruiaval. More than 250 years earlier, Martin, described how 'every Bachelor-Wooer is by ancient Custom obliged in Honour to give a specimen of his Affection for the Love of his Mistress'.

By bowing out from the rock over the cliff while standing on one foot, the suitor was 'accounted worthy of the finest Mistress in the World'.

National Trust Of Scotland

Similar to the Lovers Stone with similar results :-)
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
25th September 2017ce

The Mistress Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>The Mistress Stone</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
25th September 2017ce

Tobar Childa (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Folklore

Macaulay, in his "History of St. Kilda" published in 1764, describes a spring there called by the inhabitants Toberi-Clerich, the cleric in question being, according to him, Columba. "This welI," he says, "is below the village, . . . and gushes out like a torrent from the face of a rock. At every full tide the sea overflows it, but how soon that ebbs away, nothing can be fresher or sweeter than the water. It was natural enough for the St. Kildians to imagine that so extraordinary a phenomenon must have been the effect of some supernatural cause, and one of their teachers would have probably assured them that Columba, the great saint of their island and a mighty worker of miracles, had destroyed the influence which, according to the established laws of nature, the sea should have had on that water," This spring resembles one in the parish of Tain, in Ross-shire, known as St. Mary's Well. The latter is covered several hours each day by the sea, but when the tide retires its fresh, sweet water gushes forth again.

MacAulay The History of St Kilda 1764
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
22nd September 2017ce
Showing 1-10 of 76 posts. Most recent first | Next 10