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Lewis and Harris

<b>Lewis and Harris</b>Posted by MartinCnoc Fillibhear Bheag © Martin
Also known as:
  • Eilean Leadhais

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Sites in this group:

27 posts
Achmore Stone Circle
1 post
Aird Sleitenish Stone Circle
3 posts
Airigh Mhaoldonuich Standing Stone / Menhir
10 posts
Airigh nam Bidearan Stone Row / Alignment
10 posts
Airigh Na Beinne Bige Stone Circle
6 posts
Airigh Na Beinn Bige Cairns Cairn(s)
Allt An-T-Sniomh Chambered Cairn
4 posts
Ballantrushall Stone Circle
10 posts
Barraglom Cup Marked Stone
4 posts
Benside
51 posts
Bernera Bridge Circle Stone Circle
7 posts
Borve Burial Cairn Cairn(s)
11 posts
Borve Chamber Cairn Chambered Cairn
4 posts
Bostadh Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
11 posts
Breasclete Chambered Cairn
1 post
Caisteal Mhic Creacail Chambered Cairn
295 posts
Callanish Standing Stones
4 posts
Carnan a'Ghrodhair Souterrain
1 post
Carn A' Mharc Chambered Cairn
5 posts
Carn MacAskill Cairn(s)
56 posts
Ceann Hulavig Stone Circle
2 posts
Clachan a Chaluim Standing Stones
42 posts
Clach an Trushal Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Clach an Tursa Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Clach Bioreach Standing Stone / Menhir
Clach Ghlas Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Clach Na Greine Standing Stone / Menhir
Clach Stein Standing Stone / Menhir
6 posts
Clach Stein Standing Stones
7 posts
Clach Stei Lin Stone Circle
7 posts
Cliacabhaigh Standing Stone / Menhir
8 posts
Cùl a'Chleit Standing Stones
64 posts
Cnoc Ceann a'Gharraidh Stone Circle
72 posts
Cnoc Fillibhear Bheag Stone Circle
5 posts
1 site
Cnoc Nan Dursainean Chambered Cairn
4 posts
Cnoc Na Croich Chambered Tomb
4 posts
Cnoc Sgeir na h-Uidhe Standing Stone / Menhir
18 posts
Coire na Feinne Chambered Cairn
12 posts
Druim Dubh Stone Circle
2 posts
Druim nam Bidearan Standing Stones
1 post
Dunan Chambered Cairn
2 posts
Dun Barraglom Broch
2 posts
Dun Bharabhat Stone Fort / Dun
1 post
Dun Bharclin Stone Fort / Dun
9 posts
Dun Boraigeo Stone Fort / Dun
1 post
Dun Borranish Stone Fort / Dun
Dun Borve Broch
21 posts
Dun Borve Stone Fort / Dun
50 posts
Dun Carloway Broch
3 posts
Dun Cromor Stone Fort / Dun
13 posts
Dun Innisgall Stone Fort / Dun
2 posts
Dun Loch an Duin Stone Fort / Dun
16 posts
Dun Stuaidh Promontory Fort
15 posts
Fang Circle Stone Circle
1 post
Great Bernera Broch
4 posts
H141 - Horgabost Stone Setting
5 posts
1 site
Horgabost Standing Stone / Menhir
16 posts
Iarsiadar Standing Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Kyle's Cairn Cairn(s)
3 posts
Loch An Duin Stone Fort / Dun
7 posts
Loch an Duin (Scalpay) Stone Fort / Dun
1 post
Loch an Dun Stone Fort / Dun
7 posts
Loch an Duna Broch
3 posts
Loch An Dunain Stone Fort / Dun
4 posts
Loch Bhalairiop Crannog
25 posts
The Macleod Stone Standing Stone / Menhir
12 posts
Na Dromannan Stone Circle
19 posts
Olcote Kerbed Cairn
4 posts
Priests Glen
18 posts
Rodelpark Stone Fort / Dun
3 posts
Rodel R141 Promontory Fort
2 posts
Roghadal Stone Circle
15 posts
Rubha Charnain Cup Marked Stone
8 posts
S64, Scarista Burial Chamber
10 posts
S70, Scarista Burial Chamber
2 posts
1 site
Scarista - S56 Stone Row / Alignment
20 posts
Sgarasta Standing Stone / Menhir
1 post
Shawbost Promontory Fort
5 posts
Sleeping Beauty
20 posts
Steinacleit Stone Circle
12 posts
Stonefield Standing Stone / Menhir
4 posts
Stone 10
4 posts
Taransay Standing Stone / Menhir
12 posts
Toe Head Broch
13 posts
Traigh Bostadh Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork
2 posts
Traigh Na Berie Broch
Sites of disputed antiquity:
3 posts
Cleiteir Standing Stones Standing Stones
2 posts
Cnoc Dubh
16 posts
Sildinis Kerbed Cairn

News

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Iron Age Burial Gives Insights Into Ancient Islanders

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-38920311
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th February 2017ce

Contentious £200m Lewis windfarm takes step forward


environmental survey for site on outskirts of Stornoway lodged with Scottish Government


Plans to build a controversial £200million windfarm on the outskirts of Stornoway have moved forward... continues...
moss Posted by moss
24th September 2010ce

Prehistoric discovery may delay Lewis development


A Neolithic cairn discovered on Lewis could force a controversial wind-farm plan to be redrawn... continues...
baza Posted by baza
4th August 2006ce
Edited 17th July 2017ce

Council backs huge wind farm plan


"Plans to build the largest onshore wind farm in Europe have been approved by Comhairle nan Eilean Siar (Western Isles Council).
An application by Lewis Wind Power for a 209 turbine wind farm in North Lewis, costing £400m, was passed by 19 votes to eight on Wednesday evening.

It was approved despite more than 4,000 objections... continues...
baza Posted by baza
1st July 2005ce

Links

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ARCHway


An Account of some Remains of Antiquity In the Island of Lewis, one of the Hebrides. In a letter from Colin M'Kenzie, Esq to John M'Kenzie, Esq;

From Archaeologica Scotica: transactions of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
Volume 1 (1792)
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
21st August 2006ce

Latest posts for Lewis and Harris

Showing 1-10 of 1,169 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

H141 - Horgabost (Stone Setting) — Fieldnotes

This is the furthest north of the stone settings and it looks directly north into the bay at Nisabost, the wondrous sands of Luskentyre and the mountains beyond. Also it looks down on to the camp site and the chippy van.

Spread over an area over 12m the stone setting is on top of large green mound. The furthest north part of the site resembles the outer edge/arc of a hut circle.

The underfoot conditions are quite good as the grass is reasonably short thanks to the army of local greenkeepers i.e. the sheep who do a fine job. Some parts are sandy thanks to the dunes.

A great place to spend an hour or two. Nobody bothers you at these barely known about sites, so a great chance to try and emulate these folks from a long time ago.

Visited 1/8/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
11th September 2017ce

Horgabost - H10 (Stone Setting) — Fieldnotes

From the standing stone at Horgabost walk about 100 meters to the north west. Yet another unusual site, for me, a stone setting appearing to look north to the Nisabost Bay and the mountains beyond.

The setting is on top of a small grassy hillock being spread over an area of 3m by 2.5m. There also appears to be some very small and pointy standing stones. Yet another site that makes me wonder what is underneath all of these dunes, could be the Forvie of the west.

Visited 1/8/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
11th September 2017ce

Horgabost (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

I parked at the cattle grid just to the west of Nisabost or Coire Na Feinne (chamber cairn) on the A859. From the grid it is a short walk over the dunes to the unusual, to me, site.

The actual standing stone is a rock placed on plate rock propped up by chokes. Other stones lay fallen nearby and possibly formed a stone circle. Some of the circle might have consisted of the natural outcrops. To the south is the bay of Traigh Lar and from there McLeod stone can be seen. This area is 'hoaching' (good doric word meaning there are lots of) with small sites an indication of much prehistoric inhabitation. One day the dunes will blow away and I'm sure much more will be discovered.

Just enough time to look for a couple of more sites before going to the Borve Burial Cairn. The McLeod Stone would be visited later in the week.

Visited 1/8/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
11th September 2017ce

Borve Burial Cairn (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

The burial cairn at Borve is a truly beautiful place with spectacular views out to the Atlantic and the stunning Harris scenery in every other direction. Further down the coast, to the south, is Borve's chamber cairn. The warmth encouraged this visitor to take time to locate almost all of the west coast sites.

The other thing that makes this site impressive, in my opinion, is the fact that it is gradually eroding back into the sea as if nature was reclaiming its own. I'd imagine this coastline takes an almighty battering during a storm.

I parked just south of Loch Cisteabhat, on the A859, and headed west. No difficulties on this short walk, the grass was very short and a lot of rock plate covered the distance. The cairn itself is perched on top of a small cliff and is gradually falling away down on to the beach and sea. However it still remains at nearly 10m wide with north side being about 1.5m tall and the south side nearly 3m tall being built with small pebbles. As usual a certain amount of houking has taken place.

A great place to sit and watch the sea which is exactly what I did whilst thinking about all the places visited during the day. Then it was back to the chalet to try some the Isle Of Harris gin.

Visited 1/8/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
8th September 2017ce

Clach Na Greine (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

To the north of the Scalpay road on the eastern outskirts of Tarbert stands the Clach Na Greine standing stone. It has superb views of Loch Tarbert and the mountains especially to the west.

How this stands is something of a miracle in itself as most of Harris is rock, except for the strip of land in the south west and surprisingly a lot of Scalpay. Peter May's The Coffin Road was inspired by this as coffins (and their inhabitant) had to carried from the east to the west to be buried.

The stone stands at about 1.75m high, coming to a pointy end, and at it's base is 1.5m. Choke stones can be spotted propping the stone up which sits on a rocky platform.

I parked at a butchers yard and walked about 100 meters back east beyond some blasted rock, then headed north jumping a ditch and followed a fence. Worthwhile if only to see the views of the Loch Tarbert and beyond into The Minch.

Our next stop was the distillery at Tarbert to visit our whisky barrel which had just had it's first birthday. (Their gin is superb as well, much needed after a long evening walk.)

Visited 1/8/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
6th September 2017ce

Loch an Duin (Scalpay) (Stone Fort / Dun) — Links

Canmore


Wonderful aerial photos of the dun.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
6th September 2017ce

Loch an Duin (Scalpay) (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

Tarbert is the capital of Harris, home to an excellent distillery, home of Harris Tweed and the main ferry port. It is also the starting point to the island of Scalpay which is connected to the mainland by a fantastic bridge, stunning in design and appearance. From Tarbert go east following the signpost to Kyles and Scalpay. One of the reasons for the visit was obviously the dun, another reason was Gandalf's scarf and other clothing made for The Lord Of The Rings and The Hobbit. Unbelievably this shop, situated in the islands village (former school), was closed so it was onwards to the dun.

Once over the bridge turn first left and follow the road until the second corner near some houses, the first corner leads to the old ferry. If you look closely there is a wee sign saying heritage trail which goes all the way round the island. This trail is a beautiful walk, if somewhat marshy, following the northern shore of Loch An Duin, home to the dun.

The dun, possibly two islands, is located in the western part of the loch and has a causeway coming from the western shore. Canmore has some wonderful photos of the causeway in the link below. Parts of the wall can still be seen from the shore. Sadly no walking this causeway as it was to narrow and after looking at Canmore's photos it seemed to come to an abrupt stop.

Another magical place and enjoyable walk, the dog enjoyed the loch. With that it was back to Tarbert via a standing stone.

Visited 1/8/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
6th September 2017ce

Dun Boraigeo (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

After surviving the mud spreads of Dun Innisgall we travelled further along the coastal road to the township of Strond. We parked at the first cattle and looked towards the Atlantic. A and B headed to Borrisdale (a good move) whilst I headed west.

This dun is the smallest I've seen and I believe that nobody could have lived here, this was the place were the last stand would have taken place. From the cattle grid head west and downhill until a fence. The mysterious mounds associated with the area are much in evidence. Jump the fence, cross a grassy section (boggy in bits), head slightly south and a small cliff face is reached. Opposite this cliff is the dun.

I climbed down and crossed the slippery rocks, reached the other side and climbed up into the dun. Finding a safe path up is difficult so take care.

Not much of the dun remains as erosion has washed a lot of it away. As mentioned before this wouldn't have been very big anyway as I discovered when I made it to westernmost point of the dun. What is left of the defensive wall is on the east side of the dun. Other parts of the wall can be spotted in the sea and on the slippery rocks used to reach the dun.

Truly brilliant site, truly brilliant scenery and truly scary as the tide was rushing in and started to cover my exit route.

As with all of these places that we think of isolated nowadays back in the Iron Age (and before) maybe more people lived here. There are a lot of sites in this area and near to this dun some cup marks have been found, indeed this coast line has evidence of several rock art sites. Certainly in prehistoric times this small part of Harris seems to have been well populated.

Visited 30/7/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
4th September 2017ce

Dun Innisgall (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

From Leverburgh take the coastal road signposted Carminish, The Strond and Borrisdale. Three beautiful sites are on or near this road and on this afternoon two would be visited.

The first was Dun Innisgall and we parked just before the hamlet of Carminish. For a change luck was on my side and the tide was out which meant I could jump across mud spreads normally covered in sea water. This didn't please A but it was perfectly safe, as I approached from the south and clambered onto the island of Eilean Nam Stiubhartach to walk northwards until I was just to the west of the dun. The reason for all this chancy stuff was to walk across the 2m wide causeway, I'd never walked on a sea causeway before.

Perched on top of a rock the dun is over 16m wide and must have had huge walls, at least 3m wide, going by the amount of rocks fallen on top of the mud. A lot of these rocks have also been used to built walls on the tidal island across the causeway. The dun's walls are at their best on the south side. On the north some of the island has been washed away thanks to erosion.

My imagination often runs wild at these places and this wasn't helped when the ferry appeared on its way to nearby Leverburgh. imagining they were nasty Vikings I scrambled back to the island to the west and then retraced my steps across the mud spreads to the shore. Looking back the tide had started to turn, somehow my timing had been flukily perfect.

Visited 30/7/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
4th September 2017ce

Rodel R141 (Promontory Fort) — Fieldnotes

After drying the old legs at Loch Bhalariop we climbed to the south west to overlook more magical scenery this time to the promontory fort and islands to the south. The terrain here is very good thanks to very warm weather. One or two streams to jump and field systems to cross are the only problems on the short journey south.

One striking thing about the fort is the amount of loose stones lying about everywhere. Some of these have been used to make various walls, shelters, enclosures, defences and graves (a Canmore suggestion). Inside the fort is mostly flat rock which resembles a couple of nearby duns, Rodelpark and Dun Boraigeo.

Only a couple of photos as I'd ran the camera dry and had left the rucksack at the church to pick up on the way back to our chalet. I'll take more when I get back.

Visited 30/7/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
30th August 2017ce
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