The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

 

The Burren

Sites in this group:

6 posts
An Ráth Rath
2 posts
Ballyallaban Bullaun Stone
2 posts
Ballycasheen Portal Tomb
6 posts
Ballyganner North Court Tomb
6 posts
Ballyganner North II Wedge Tomb
7 posts
Ballyganner North III Wedge Tomb
6 posts
Ballyganner South Wedge Tomb
3 posts
Ballyganner South Souterrain
Ballykinvarga Stone Fort / Dun
Baur North Wedge Tomb
7 posts
1 site
Baur South Wedge Tomb
8 posts
Berneens Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Boloona Wedge Tomb
17 posts
Cahercommaun Stone Fort / Dun
8 posts
Caherconnell Stone Fort / Dun
4 posts
Caherdooneerish Stone Fort / Dun
3 posts
Cahermackirilla Stone Row / Alignment
5 posts
Cahermacnaghten Stone Fort / Dun
3 posts
Carran Cairn(s)
4 posts
Castletown Wedge Tomb
6 posts
Clooneen Wedge Tomb
27 posts
Creevagh Wedge Tomb
Derrynavahagh Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Eanty More Wedge Tomb
12 posts
Fanyglavin Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Faunarooska (Cl. 3) Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Faunarooska (Cl. 4) Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Faunarooska (Cl. 5) Wedge Tomb
17 posts
Gleninsheen Wedge Tomb
9 posts
Gleninsheen Wedge Tomb
1 post
Iskancullin Wedge Tomb
1 post
Lissateeaun Rath
2 posts
Lissylisheen Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Meggagh Wedge Tomb
1 post
Moheramoylan (Cl. 30) Wedge Tomb
7 posts
Poulaphuca Wedge Tomb
13 posts
2 sites
Poulawack Cairn(s)
61 posts
Poulnabrone Portal Tomb
2 posts
Rannagh West Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Slievenaglasha Wedge Tomb
5 posts
Teergonean Court Tomb
Tullycommon Wedge Tomb

News

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Bear skull from Aillwee Cave over 10,000yrs old


https://www.rte.ie/news/2018/0704/976284-bear-skull/
"New analysis of the skull of a brown bear discovered in Aillwee Cave in Co Clare over four decades ago has found that it is more than 10,400 years old... continues...
tjj Posted by tjj
4th July 2018ce
Edited 4th July 2018ce

Mystery surrounds Burren settlement excavated by archaeologists


When a prehistoric people built a large settlement in the Burren up to 3,000 years ago, why did they choose a mountain-top with no running water?
Was it the closest point to a sky god, or was the location selected for some type of ancient gathering or “Dáil”?
“Truly one of the most enigmatic places in Irish prehistory” is how N... continues...
moss Posted by moss
2nd May 2016ce

Links

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Burren Ireland information monuments and history


Ringforts, monuments, archaeological Dig etc
bogman Posted by bogman
20th August 2010ce

Archaeology of the Burren: Prehistoric Forts and Dolmens in North Clare by Thomas Johnson Westropp


"The articles presented here contain a complete record of the prehistoric monuments of northern Clare which were surveyed, described and illustrated by Thomas J. Westropp. The articles were originally published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland between 1896 and 1916".
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
9th January 2006ce
Edited 9th January 2006ce

RTE items on The archaeology of The Burren


News items from 1999 on the discoveries in The Burren.
Check out the audio files. Archaeologists, historians and thr local farmer talk about the excavations, finds and significance of The Burren
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
14th February 2005ce

Burrenbeo - comprehensive guide of the Burren


Interactive interpretative story of the Burren, Ireland.
Posted by burrenbeo
11th October 2002ce

Latest posts for the Burren

Showing 1-10 of 355 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Leana (Cl. 68) (Wedge Tomb) — Fieldnotes

Visited 22/5/18: Having just visited Parknabinnia we spotted a small group of people at what appeared to be another wedge tomb on a high point on the other side of the narrow road. It was a beautiful morning so a pleasure to make our way slowly towards them looking at all the wild flowers (mostly orchids) on the way.

I think we were sort of hoping the group would have moved on by the time we reached the wedge tomb but they were engrossed in drawing and measuring the tomb. We could also see it was the same small group we had had a happy chance encounter with the previous day - an archaeologist named Ros and three American students. As with the day before, Ros was helpful and generous with the information he gave us - am very grateful, as our two encounters enhanced our own visits tremendously.
tjj Posted by tjj
23rd May 2018ce

Leana (Cl. 68) (Wedge Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Leana (Cl. 68)</b>Posted by tjj tjj Posted by tjj
23rd May 2018ce

Parknabinnia (Cl. 67) (Wedge Tomb) — Fieldnotes

Visited 22/5/18: Following on from previous day when we had a happy chance encounter with Ros, an archaeologist, and his three archaeology students, who had told us about Parknabinnia wedge tomb we made our way out there this morning full of anticipation. Close to the village of Kilnaboy, what a wonderful site - easily accessed as well sign-posted near to the narrow road which is part of the Burren Way. The wedge tomb is still in reasonable condition and set inside a stony circular area.
We could see some people on the other side of the road at what appeared to be another wedge tomb on a high point. We slowly made our way towards them taking in the wonderful displays of wild orchids on the way. The people turned out to be Ros and his students again. Ros generously spent some time talking to us telling us where we might find other wedge tombs further back in the fields behind Parknabinnia around a large area of hazel scrub.

We thanked him for his help, went off to examine another collapsed wedge tomb before going back to Parknabinnia. The field behind Parknabinnia turned out to be a bit hazardous as the spongy moss concealed not just limestones but lots of holes too. Although the OS map shows many red dots representing megalithic tombs we decided we wouldn't risk twisting an ankle (or worse) and were unsuccessful in finding any more.
tjj Posted by tjj
22nd May 2018ce
Edited 23rd May 2018ce

Parknabinnia (Cl. 67) (Wedge Tomb) — Images

<b>Parknabinnia (Cl. 67)</b>Posted by tjj<b>Parknabinnia (Cl. 67)</b>Posted by tjj tjj Posted by tjj
22nd May 2018ce

Poulnabrone (Portal Tomb) — Fieldnotes

Visited today Sunday 20/5/18 - am in County Clare exploring the Burren, this trip mainly focusing on the flora and geology. This being the west coast of Ireland, however, while the rest of the British Isles has clear skies and sunshine, it was overcast and windy this morning on the Burren. The weather cannot detract from this amazing landscape though - wild flowers out in profusion. Orchids, violets, primroses are everywhere, also gentian and large patches of mountain avens. Two delicate quite rare alpine flowers I've personally never seen before.

At the car parking area there is a man selling trinkets and another one playing Danny Boy on a tin whistle whilst sitting in a plastic tent. A film crew seem to be there with cameras and a drone. There are lots of people wandering over the the limestone slabs, including a botany group from Germany who managed to find the tiny gentian flowers.

The information board tells me Poulnabrone is a portal tomb situated in a karst limestone plateau 150 metres above sea level. The tomb was constructed from great slabs of lime stone over 5,000 years ago. Archaeologists have discovered the remains of 30 people at this ancient site.

The Burren is an amazing landscape - have only just scratched the surface of what it has to offer but here for the rest of the week. At the moment of writing this the rain is coming down in stair rods ...
tjj Posted by tjj
20th May 2018ce

Poulnabrone (Portal Tomb) — Images

<b>Poulnabrone</b>Posted by tjj<b>Poulnabrone</b>Posted by tjj<b>Poulnabrone</b>Posted by tjj tjj Posted by tjj
20th May 2018ce

An Ráth (Rath) — Images

<b>An Ráth</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
29th October 2017ce
Showing 1-10 of 355 posts. Most recent first | Next 10