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Cheetham Barrow (Artificial Mound) — Fieldnotes

I headed up to Cheetham barrow today and it is easy to find. It is a nice straightforward 15 minute walk from Hawkshaw village and if you use the OS map it is easy to locate

The barrow is bigger than the pictures suggest and it is a nice, quiet location where you can get some decent but not spectacular views to the south over Manchester.

Its difficult to understand why this location was chosen for the barrow as it is not the highest point around but then again if we knew why our ancestors chose these places then these places wouldn't be as special as they are

Thirteen Stones Hill (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

I headed up here one evening. It is only a short walk and is easy to get to. There is ample parking behind the houses at the entrance to Clough head quarry.

Sadly there is only one stone remaining upright and it looks quite new almost as if it has been placed upright only over the past few hundred years.

It is a desolate place. Be prepared to come across sheep but no other walkers.

There are still some stones that are collapsed and lying in the ground but it is easy to see that this is a neglected site. Very sad!

Hanging Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Fieldnotes

The hanging stones are relatively easy to find and get to. A car park is situated near the path and then the path is easy to follow until you have to head right and follow the wall in a southerly direction. Once following the wall the ground is boggy and uneven so take care.

The stones have great views to the west. The stones have carvings on 'Hanging stone' and 'PR88ALSO94'.

The spot is a fairly isolated and lonely spot. Prepare not to encounter anyone else all day. The trip is worth it for the decent views yet I am unsure of the speciality of these stones. It didnt feel like it was a special site nor were they attractive.

Worth visiting if you are in the area but I wont be heading back. Maybe the weather was to blame though. As you can see from the pics it was misty, wet and I was pelted by a strong easterly wind

Hanging Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Hanging Stone</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Hanging Stone</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Hanging Stone</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Hanging Stone</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Hanging Stone</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge

Slipper Lowe (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Fieldnotes

Slipper lowe is easy to find and easy to get to. It is just off the road and has a car park right next to it.

It is an eerie place with thin paths leading through it though you can stray from the paths if you like.

It is very boggy and wellies are a must especially in wet weather.

There is not much to see at the site. It is nice to just wander through the trees lost in your own thoughts. There is a rounded central part in the middle that has good views all around.

Slipper Lowe (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Slipper Lowe</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Slipper Lowe</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Slipper Lowe</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Slipper Lowe</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge

The Twelve Apostles of Ilkley Moor (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

I visited the 12 apostles having parked in Ilkley and walked round the cow and calf. This is not a route for those who are not hardy or physically fit. It was a demanding route with steep parts and chest high vegatation in places.

The stones are also very difficult to find without an OS map. I didnt have one that day and I had to ask a fellow walker. Turned out I had strayed right past the stones and didnt notice them just off in the distance.

Once you do find them it truly is a magnificent place. It oozes history, it has a wonderful feel to it almost as if the stones want to talk to you. The stones are very small and some of them not standing naturally now. The stones almost say to you that 'we are small but still proud to stand on this moor'. The place is very quiet, eben some of the locals dont know its here. A wonderful place where one can relax and reflect on times gone by and what must have gone on in the past at this place, worth a visit. Only ruined by the noise of the planes at Leeds Bradford.

What is also beautiful is the view north towards Menwith hill. The air force domes sitting proudly on the hill. Looking from the 12 apostles over to that is the ancient and the new sitting together on the moors.

Castercliff Camp (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

I visited Castercliff on a wet miserable day. Not recommended. Views are limited and it can be very muddy.

Generally I was disappointed with this place.

Difficult to find and it doesnt seem to resonate history and its very difficult to make much out. It doesnt command any great views.

Check it out if you are in the area but for me there are other places nearby that are much better.

Trencrom Hill (Hillfort) — Fieldnotes

A great place to visit that has wonderful views in most directions. An especially good view south towards St Michaels Mt of which I have added a pic. Unfortunately views to the north are limited due to the lack of height that Trencrom has.

Easy to get to. Park in Trencrom village and it is an easy approach over a field and then up to the top with very limited ascent.

The fort itself is spectacular. It is easy to see why it was chosen as it has good 360 degree protection and offers decent views of the local area. The rocks also provide shelter in places. Trencrom is a very special place. You can feel the history in the air. Especially where the two stones show where the entrance into the fort was. Very serene, quiet and reflective place.

Definitely worth a visit.

Whitelow (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Whitelow is easy to find and despite living only a 15 min walk away it has taken me ages to visit here. I will definitely be going back. It is a good sight with good views over to the west and the cairn is in decent condition. It also looks like there might be the remnants of a stone circle around the cairn too but I am not 100% sure.

Mount Cross (Christianised Site) — Images

<b>Mount Cross</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge

Cheetham Close (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Cheetham Close</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge

Cheetham Close (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

Cheetham close is fairly easy to get to if you have the right footwear. Wellies are definitely recommended in winter as some of the mud is over a foot deep in places.

The place is a fantastic site once you get there after about 20 mins walk.

The site is quiet, serene and has a fantastic view southwards and to the east and west. It is easy to see why our ancestors chose this spot.

Unfortunately the stones are very small and some have collapsed but you can just about make the circle out. Definitely worth a visit.

What is interesting about the site is the earthworks and ditches/banks that surround the site on the hills. I have posted a pic above but its does not really do them justice. I cant work out what they must have been for:
1. Marking territory (seems a lot of effort to do this for this purpose)
2. Defend aggainst attack seems the obvious answer if you are to stand on the ditches when under attack

Cheetham Close (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Cheetham Close</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge

Charters Moss (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Images

<b>Charters Moss</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Charters Moss</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge

Charters Moss (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Fieldnotes

Charters Moss plantation has a path running through it but to stray off the beaten path is taking a risk (pic of the main path above added by myself).

The trees are very dense and without a good OS map or GPS it is easy to get lost in this eerie woodland area.

Not really worth a visit but its nice to know it is here. It is an eerie and quiet place. You will not meet anyone else in the wood.

Mount Cross (Christianised Site) — Fieldnotes

The cross is very easy to find. It is just over a wall on the northern side of a bridleway heading north up a very steep road from Cornholme. I would avoid heading up from Cornholme (off the A648) if possible as the road is steep and hard to pass traffic coming the other way.

The cross is in decent condition but it is leaning slightly. It is in a good place to get to as it is near the road. The cross is leaning slighlty and is very weatherd suggesting it must have stood for many a century on this wind tormented hill. Definitely worth a visit if you are passing by but dont go out of your way as the nearby wall, farm and bridleway ruin the views and place of the cross slightly.

Great Bride Stones (Natural Rock Feature) — Fieldnotes

I headed up to the bride stones today. It is easy to find and is just off the A road to the north of the stones. I would not recommend heading to the stones without a good pair of boots or wellies as it is very muddy and there is no clear path to the stones so it is a short yet treacherous journey in poor conditions.

Once there, it is a special place. Quiet and serene with decent views all around. There is definitely something special about the stones and its quiet location which only makes one reflect on all that the stones must have seen in this lonely yet special place.

Parlick Pike Cairn (Round Cairn) — Fieldnotes

I climbed Parlick today after parking up at Fell Foot as this is the recommended route. It is very steep and almost vertical at times but on the whole it took only 30 minutes to climb and this included frequent stops to catch my breath and take in the views. This route is not for the unfit as the climb is challenging.

The cairn at the top of Parlick is massive and is in need of a bit of repair as most of the stones are scattered about. However the two cairns on the top of nearby Fair Snape are both in very good condition.

The views are amazing from Parlick. You can see Pendle hill and Longridge Fell to the south. Over to the west you can see Blackpool tower on a clear day and you can make out the Bleasdale circle if you look closely enough. I took the 45 minute walk over to Fair Snape Fell which is a nice stroll and not too challenging however it is very windy on this walk. The wind comes battering in from the Irish Sea and even on a July day it was very chilly up there.

Overall a nice day and well worth a visit.

Bleasedale Circle (Timber Circle) — Fieldnotes

I headed for Bleasdale circle today on a dry but windy April day. I found the village of Bleasdale hard to find - you need to take a road off the beaten track that is signposted Bleasdale Cottages and then you are in the village centre.

Once in the village there are plenty of signs explaining whrere the circle is. The village was dead! Not a soul around so I carried on regardless and went over the kissing gate towards the circle. Still not a soul around apart from hundreds if sheep.

Heading towards the circle the views up Parlick and the other fells are breathtaking. What a view this site must have commanded many years ago. I also have to add that the fields on the way to the site were not muddy at all. It was a fine brisk walk to the site.

The site is nice and probably met my expectations. It commands a great spot and is bleak and almost enchanting. Its wonderful to imagine what went on there all those years ago.

My only disappointment is that the old timber posts have long gone and are replaced by concrete ones. This to me was a real shame. The trees also spoilt the view of the surrounding areas.

Castlesteads (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Castlesteads</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Castlesteads</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Castlesteads</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Castlesteads</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Castlesteads</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge<b>Castlesteads</b>Posted by Saban-of-Stonehenge
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