The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Rockmarshall (Court Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

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Drumnasillagh (Court Tomb) — Images

<b>Drumnasillagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Drumnasillagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Drumnasillagh</b>Posted by ryaner

Drumnasillagh (Court Tomb) — Miscellaneous

The following description is derived from both the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Louth' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1986) and the 'Archaeological Survey of County Louth' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1991). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.
Date of upload/revision: 17 July 2007

This court-tomb is incorporated in a roughly trapezoidal cairn some 30m long and 20m wide at the WSW, narrowing to 7.1m wide at the ESE. There is a well-defined court at the W leading to the gallery area which is covered by cairn material. The court, 7.5m wide and 6m deep, embraces almost three-quarters of a circle and is represented by 14 orthostats, 7 at either side. Two large slabs lie at the inner end of the court. A single façade stone stands beyond the N arm of the court. Two kerb stones are exposed at the E end of the cairn and a field wall runs along its southern side. (PRIA (C) 1960, 128-9)

Drumnasillagh (Court Tomb) — Images

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Commons (Court Tomb) — Images

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Lurgankeel (Wedge Tomb) — Images

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Kilberrihert large wedge tomb damaged — Images

<b>Kilberrihert large wedge tomb damaged</b>Posted by ryaner

Aghnafarcan (Court Tomb) — Folklore

In the folk tradition it is the burial place of a Scandinavian giant called Manowar, who came here to kill Fin McCool. Fearing the foreign visitor, Fin had himself disguised as a baby by his wife and bit Manowar on the finger when the latter attempted to tease him. As this was just the baby Manowar became afraid and attempted to leave but dropped dead mysteriously afterwards.
(Flanagan 1933; IFC, Schools MSS, (931)

Stonehenge (Stone Circle) — News

Bones found at Stonehenge belonged to people from Wales


Tests show 5,000-year-old remains found at the world heritage site came from more than 100 miles away in west Wales

Maev Kennedy

The bones of people buried at Stonehenge, who died and were cremated about 5,000 years ago, have given up their secrets: like the bluestones, which form part of the famous prehistoric monument, they came from west Wales, near the Preseli Hills where the stones were quarried.

The remains of at least 10 of 25 individuals, whose brittle charred bones were buried at the monument, showed that they did not spend their lives on the Wessex chalk downland, but came from more than 100 miles away. Examination of the remains showed they were consistent with a region that includes west Wales, the most likely origin of at least some of these people.

Although the team, led by scientists from the University of Oxford with colleagues in Paris and Brussels, cannot prove that the remains are of people who actually built the monument, the earliest cremation dates are described as “tantalisingly” close to the date when the bluestones were brought into the earlier ditch and bank monument to form the first stone circle.

More:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/aug/02/revealed-stonehenge-buried-welsh?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Gleninsheen (Wedge Tomb) — Images

<b>Gleninsheen</b>Posted by ryaner

Gleninsheen (Wedge Tomb) — Links

Irish Archaeology


The Gleninsheen Gold Collar, a Bronze Age Treasure
By Colm on April 23, 2015 in Archaeology blogs, Irish treasures

Piperstown (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Piperstown</b>Posted by ryaner

Fuerty (Wedge Tomb) — Images

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Lisduff (Wedge Tomb) — Images

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Flaskagh More (Court Tomb) — Images

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Corraluastia (Wedge Tomb) — Images

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Taxi-driving, graphic artist with a penchant for high hills and low boulders. Currently residing in Tallaght where I can escape to the wildernesses of Wicklow within 10 minutes.

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