The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

Get the TMA Images feed
Latest Posts

Showing 1-50 of 121,342 posts. Most recent first | Next 50

Scotland (Country) — Links

Rampant Scotland


A fine collection of Scottish archaeological websites, many with prehistoric-related contents
spencer Posted by spencer
3rd December 2016ce

Parknook (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Take the B9077, Leggart Terrace/South Deeside Road, west leaving Aberdeen and take the first minor road heading south. Follow this road, past the Tollohill car park, until the first minor road leading north west. At the first corner there is enough room for a car to park. This is the west entrance to the Parknook/Tollohill Wood walks.

Follow the path uphill and on the first ridge head north. This will lead to the severely mutilated and all but gone Parknook Cairn. A near neighbour was removed altogether.

What is left is the outer rim of a once 17 metres wide cairn. At its widest this rim is two metres and stands at almost 0.5 metres. Possible kerbs also survive to the south and east. Still it has very beautiful surroundings and now remains undisturbed.

Almost gone, it is an echo from a long time ago.

Visited 1/12/2016.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
2nd December 2016ce

Hill Of Tillybath (Cairn(s)) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Hill Of Tillybath</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hill Of Tillybath</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hill Of Tillybath</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hill Of Tillybath</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hill Of Tillybath</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hill Of Tillybath</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hill Of Tillybath</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Hill Of Tillybath</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
2nd December 2016ce

Machuim (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Machuim</b>Posted by ironstone ironstone Posted by ironstone
2nd December 2016ce

Balbirnie (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Balbirnie</b>Posted by ironstone<b>Balbirnie</b>Posted by ironstone ironstone Posted by ironstone
2nd December 2016ce

Leys of Marlee (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Leys of Marlee</b>Posted by ironstone<b>Leys of Marlee</b>Posted by ironstone ironstone Posted by ironstone
2nd December 2016ce

Lundin Farm (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Lundin Farm</b>Posted by ironstone<b>Lundin Farm</b>Posted by ironstone<b>Lundin Farm</b>Posted by ironstone ironstone Posted by ironstone
2nd December 2016ce

Parknook (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Parknook</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Parknook</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Parknook</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Parknook</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Parknook</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Parknook</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
2nd December 2016ce

Upper Balfour 3 (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

From the Kirkton Wood cairn I headed a wee bit further south, jumped the fence, found a gate, climbed over and headed east into a forest of whins, furze and various jabby things. Still I found a route through the frozen wastes and underfoot conditions from hell. They may have been cut and burnt a lot of vegetation but the remnants are just are as bad and treacherous.

This would be a nice cairn if there wasn't so much vegetation piled on top of it. A broken tree adds the scene and helpfully marks out the site and width of the cairn. Kerbs are visible on the eastern side of the cairn which sits at over 9 metres wide and is 0.6 metres tall. The centre has houked which might explain the small pile of stones nearby.

The views from here are stunning, Morven to the west and Bennachie to the north.

Visited 24/11/2016.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
2nd December 2016ce

Kirkton Wood (Kerbed Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Leave the B9077 at Kirkton Of Durris heading south and park at the village halls. Follow the minor road until it ends and head up the hill following the path until it also ends. Just before it ends look immediately west and the cairn can be found. Also helpful is the sign saying the site is a scheduled monument.

This , I think, would also be a good site for some gentle restoration. Canmore says there are four kerbs in the southern flank, I agree and would add another two. Sadly the path clips the site on the eastern side and as usual some houking has also been done. Despite this the cairn is still sits at 11 meters wide and is 0.6 metres high.

This is a well situated cairn which many years ago would have wonderful views, especially north. Today it still has wonderful views, the trees in their Autumn colours.

Visited 24/11/2016.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
2nd December 2016ce

Gardom's Ring Cairn — Fieldnotes

The path makes its descent, cutting through a cairnfield of pretty large, irregularly shaped cairns. The Gardom’s Edge ring cairn is completely hidden by bracken, but can be spotted by the forked silver birch that grows from its embanked edge. Once found, the course can be followed round easily enough, but really this is a place for a winter visit if you want to see it properly. thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

The Three Men of Gardoms (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

We follow the arc of Meg’s Walls south, before leaving the wood to emerge at the Three Men cairn. The three stone piles are clearly modern, but they sit on a much larger footprint. The views from here are great, looking down on Baslow as the sun sinks further. It’s starting to get colder and it won’t be long now until dark, so we press on without lingering. thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

Gardom's Edge (Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art) — Fieldnotes

Next up, we encounter the stonework of Meg’s Walls. Half-buried in the undergrowth, too large to take in easily, this is a fascinating survivor enhanced by a lovely woodland setting. But we’re really here for rock art. After a bit of rooting about in the undergrowth, we find it on the edge of the woods, looking towards the steep western face of Birchen Edge. The light is now too low to illuminate the panel, but casts a soft orange glow across the moor ahead of us.

Despite knowing that it’s a replica, the panel itself is still very impressive. I love the variety of patterns, whatever it represents – or doesn’t. Water has collected in the deepest cup, reflecting the slender trees and blue sky above, an ever open, all-seeing eye on the world.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

Gardoms Standing Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

The main reason for coming here is the rock art panel, so memorably filled with pink flowers by Postman a few years ago. But first, I’m hoping to find the standing stone, something of a rarity in this area. We walk through the woods, trying to stay away from the treeless edge, as I know the stone won’t be found there. It turns out to be further south than I’d realised, another site that the Ordnance Survey map doesn’t show. Eventually it makes itself known, as we get towards the higher part of the wood. The light has gone strange now, the low sun filtered around the edges of a bank of cloud giving an ethereal glow to the woods and the stone.

The stone is a good one, a little taller than I imagined and different from each angle and direction. Like many of the best standing stones, it gives off a feeling of sentience. Even though I know this is just projection on my part, it’s hard to shake once felt. There’s no malignance, or beneficence, just a presence. I often find woodland sites hard to leave, and the stone definitely exerts a pull. As we leave I’m compelled to look back, Orpheus to Eurydice.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

Barbrook I (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

The third of today’s stone circles, and very different again from the other two. This is yer classic Peaks embanked circle, compact and neat. Unlike, say, Nine Ladies, the stones are quite varied in size, although with no particularly obvious grading towards a compass point. The top of one of the stones has cupmarks, something I was completely unaware of, but which recalls the stone at Stanage we visited yesterday.

When we first got into stone circles, I read that the Barbrook sites and Big Moor were closed for environmental reasons – this was in the days before the Countryside and Rights of Way Act opened up swathes of access land, and before the internet might have told me different – so we never came here on our earlier Peaks holidays. As I’ve felt throughout these last three days, the long wait has both sharpened and sweetened the experience of finally coming to these sites. They compare with the best.

The proximity of the track perhaps keeps this from quite reaching the heights of Barbrook II as a place to find solitude, but in truth no one passes our way in the time we’re here. We will definitely be back here.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

Barbrook cairns (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

The cairn cemetery lying between Barbrook II and Barbrook I proves well worth a stop off. A widely varied group, mostly dug into in the mid-19th century, many have excellent kerbs. The star of the show is the rebuilt cairn closest to Barbrook I, a bit of a classic of drystone edging about four courses high. One of the stones in the surround shows an interesting weathered pattern that is probably natural, but just possibly could be the very eroded trace of cupmarks.

From here we drop slightly to Barbrook I.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

Barbrook II (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

Barbrook II is a bit of an enigma. A circle of free-standing stones, enclosed within a thick drystone wall that stands only slightly lower than the tops of the stones. I’m instantly in love with this place. We’ve never been before, another omission long awaiting correction. The circle feels utterly secluded, the wall and stones are low enough to escape attention from anyone but a deliberate visitor, especially as the Ordnance Survey map perplexingly shows no sign of the circle or nearby cairns at all, other than a misleading “field system” label.

This is somewhere to spend time, to watch the clouds and the changing light over the moor. We sit here for a while, no-one comes, nothing intrudes. There are lots of details, the burial cairn inside the circle, the large stone propped against the outside of the drystone wall, there’s also a cupmarked stone in the central cist but I don’t even notice it. The next time I come – and I really hope that isn’t too long away – I’ll pay more attention to these little elements, but today I’m so overwhelmed by the whole that I couldn’t really care less. Perfect.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

Barbrook III (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

The first site of the day, Barbrook III will be the most difficult to find, rendered so by small stones and tall grasses. Leaving the embanked edge of the reservoir behind, we follow a faint path NNE, hoping that the stones will show themselves. Arriving at a darker ring of bracken, obvious amongst the pale oranges of reedy grass, I concede that we’ve gone too far this time, so we head slightly downhill and back on ourselves. Soon after the first stone appears, barely peaking its head above the vegetation. Then another, and another, and another. This is a laugh out loud circle, so easy to miss yet huge in size, if not stones, once discovered.

It’s a bit squelchy, the stones are half-hidden, their spacing makes it hard to photograph more than a couple at a time, but it’s truly wonderful. The relative flatness of the moor makes the surroundings somewhat undramatic, but instead there is a sense of secrecy that has a charm all of its own. The play of light on the rising ground to the west, the gnarly lichen on one of the stones, the patterns of erosion and wear on the upper surfaces of others, all combine into a near perfect experience. We can see cars on the road, walkers in the distance, but it seems almost unthinkable that any of them might ever come here. Hidden in plain sight, a gem all the more precious for its coyness.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
1st December 2016ce

Stonehenge and its Environs — News

Salisbury by-pass considered as an alternative to tunnel


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-35322444

Amesbury Museum and Heritage Trust posted the above news link on FB this morning with the following statement:

"Two years ago today, the government lost its credibility here when, in a moment of pre election spin it pledged that a tunnel should be ploughed through the Stonehenge landscape so that public can no longer slow traffic down to see them, so that people in the West Country will vote for them and reap huge! benefits from saving 30 mins traffic delays on a Friday afternoon, Saturday morning and Bank holidays and so that over the coming century arguably one of the most significant Mesolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age landscape in Europe if not the World will be desecrated and our past consigned to the past. Once a concrete structure replaces a cubic kilometre of chalk there is no return, the chalk lands and natural aquifers will be altered, water flows will change and unless maintained for perpetuity, once the tunnel comes to the end of its 125yr life design, it will become the biggest man made headache for future generations to deal with. If by some pure act of vandalism the Government manage to continue to deliver this outrageous ill conceived scheme, they and those who support it will be named, published and go down in history as the vandals who destroyed Stonehenge and Britain's heritage.
The Trust will continue to support a southern bypass reroute that provides a sustainable long term solution for South Wiltshire, the living, as well as the dead. This alternative solution would do what the tunnel won't do and open up fully the Stonehenge Landscape without destroying it. We hope when a public consultation is eventually launched, common sense prevails and credibility is restored."
tjj Posted by tjj
1st December 2016ce

Unstan (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Unstan</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Unstan</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Unstan</b>Posted by A R Cane<b>Unstan</b>Posted by A R Cane A R Cane Posted by A R Cane
30th November 2016ce

Brimmond Hill (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

This is a beautiful walk with stunning views at the top. All the way west to Morven, north towards Knock Hill, east to the North Sea (Don and Dee mouths) and south to Cairn Mon Earn with everything inbetween. A truly fantastic setting.

Take the second minor road north east of Westhill leaving the A944, go past all the ring road stuff and pull into the Brimmond Country Park car park. A distance of about 1.5 miles. Both paths from the car park take a circular route up to the top. Take care on the southern path as it goes awol and then comes back. On the whole the paths are in good condition.

On top are a few masts, a war memorial and a cairn (2 cairns!!!). The Watchmountbrae cottage has vanished.

The ancient cairn has had a more modern cairn piled on top it! However the original site still is over 6 meters in width and is well over 0.6 metres. Grass covered stones prove it still exists as well as several kerbs poking their heads out of the turf.

Lovely site, worth it for the views alone.

Visited 17/11/2016.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
30th November 2016ce

Dolmen Serrat de les Fonts (1) (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Dolmen Serrat de les Fonts (1)</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Dolmen Serrat de les Fonts (1)</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Dolmen Serrat de les Fonts (1)</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Dolmen Serrat de les Fonts (1)</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Dolmen Serrat de les Fonts (1)</b>Posted by tiompan tiompan Posted by tiompan
29th November 2016ce

Fowler's Arm Chair Stone Circle — Fieldnotes

Follow the directions for the cairn next door, or even better get a Sweatcheat to navigate for you, cant go wrong.
You'll see the cairn first and you'll see the Arm chair before you see the circle. Fowler was a Giant, and giants like people like to lounge around and ponder the universe whilst watching the clouds drift by, perhaps he had his mate Dicky round, though where he would have sat I couldn't say, and that's if you could get him off his stool, they're a strange bunch Giants.
The Arm chair is unfortunately of the extremely uncomfortable variety, a block of sandstone, two foot tall by three feet long by a foot and a half wide, approximately. It lies within the circle, not central.

Kammer noted only three stones to the circle but Coflein said there's four, so I had a poke round with my boot tip on what looked to be the circumference of the circle, and as if by magic a stone uncovered itself before us, Alken seemed impressed, sadly my boot detected nothing more, except the usual countryside fouling.
Ordnance survey seem quite confident that this is a stone circle, but Coflein only goes as far as possible, I'm very confident of it's reality, sure, there's only four stones left, but it's placement, and it's view, especially the long one towards the winter sunset, I'm sold.
postman Posted by postman
29th November 2016ce

Fowler's Arm Chair Cairn (Round Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Presuming you've got to the insignificant no-where that is Davids Well, head west on the only turning and go as far as you can, park.
Walk.
Up hill following a track, at the top turn right, walk straight on passing a quarry, the cairn may soon be made out below you, between the slight hill your on and the next one.

We arrived just before sunset, just in time, which is good seeing as this was the seventh site of the day, it doesn't often go according to plan, but today it did, which was good, as I've said.
Coflein says of this cairn........ A much disturbed disturbed cairn, 13m in diameter and 0.4m high, showing kerb stones to the NE....... So it's in an actual class of cairns called disturbed and it's then been disturbed, further? disturbing grammar aside, the cairn is very disturbed, only the north east kerbing is possibly original, but it still goes all the way round, disturbed.
Some stones of the cairn are neatly piled, disturbed, and in the middle where one might expect a cist, only a jumble of cairn, with one possible stone that looks like it might come from a cist. Disturbed.

The large rock right next to the cairn is The Arm chair of the Giant Fowler, and encompassing it is the still discernible stone circle.
One very good thing about the site is the view down the valley, perhaps aligning the stone circle with the cairn and the mid winter sunset.
postman Posted by postman
29th November 2016ce

Fowler's Arm Chair Stone Circle — Images

<b>Fowler's Arm Chair Stone Circle</b>Posted by postman<b>Fowler's Arm Chair Stone Circle</b>Posted by postman<b>Fowler's Arm Chair Stone Circle</b>Posted by postman postman Posted by postman
29th November 2016ce
Showing 1-50 of 121,342 posts. Most recent first | Next 50