The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Tumulibos (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Tumulibos</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tumulibos</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tumulibos</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tumulibos</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tumulibos</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tumulibos</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
21st July 2017ce

Tumulibos (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Fieldnotes

Visited: July 17, 2017

More than 35 prehistoric tombs have been preserved in the Tumulibos, a small wooded area located immediately north of the the Assen-Rolde road, less than two kilometres west of the village of Rolde.

Originally a much larger cemetery existed here, and as recently as 1833 over 150 grave mounds still existed. But countless graves have fallen victim to local exploitation over the years and today only these 35 or so mounds remain. The graves in this group span a period of roughly 2500 years, the oldest ones dating from around 2900 BCE. The most recent mounds—those dating since 1100 BCE—contain exclusively cremated remains, and are referred to as 'fire hills'.

It's thanks to the Province of Drenthe that this group of prehistoric graves has survived at all, as they had the foresight to purchase the area in 1856, thus guaranteeing its future safety. Stichting Het Drentse Landschap has administered the Tumulibos since 2001. The word tumulibos simply means a ‘wood with grave mounds’—tumulus being Latin for grave mound.

To visit the Tumulibos, take the No 21 bus from Assen and step out at the stop: 'Weg naar Balloo'. Immediately north, across the main road, is Tumuliboslaan, the lane that borders Tumulibos on its east. The entire woodland is very compact, measuring only 240 × 280 metres.

As you walk up Tumuliboslaan you will see several grave mounds under the trees just a few metres into the woodland on your left. Just inside the northern boundary of the woodland, a path leads left and meanders between the tall beech trees, taking you past numerous impressive graves carpeted in fallen beech leaves. You just cannot miss them.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
21st July 2017ce

Earl Cairnie (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Earl Cairnie</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Earl Cairnie</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Earl Cairnie</b>Posted by tiompan<b>Earl Cairnie</b>Posted by tiompan tiompan Posted by tiompan
20th July 2017ce

Cloughmor (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

Heading towards Inverness from the superb Mains Of Gask chamber cairn, on the B861, take the first forestry track heading west. This track will then head south, keep going until it heads straight west. Don't follow the track keep heading south west through conditions which could be considered difficult. The forestry have cut down the trees making it a nightmare to walk on.

Once back into the trees things improved slightly. The stone itself has been knocked over by several fallen trees and was covered in moss when I visited (which I put back). It must also have be similar to its neighbour across the road at Clach An Airm. Upright, the stone would stand at 1.2 long, 1.4m high and would be 0.4m wide. After a look round and it was time to head north towards the less famous Tomfat Cairn and a thoroughly depressing walk.

Visited 30/6/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2017ce

Stony Hill (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

The last stop of great day wandering around Spey Side but a sad afternoon for prehistory ended with a climb up Stony Hill.

I parked at Pitcraigie. north of Rothes, just to the west of the A941 and up a farm track. From the barns I followed the track south, west and then north west. Stop at a gate and follow the fence west, jump over it and the dry stane dyke. Keep going and walk straight into the site. As usual small bogs, holes and heather make up the terrain.

Surrounded in glorious countryside this must have been some place. Some 600 carts of stone and bone were removed from here to make roads and walls. Also a local resident in the mid 1800s said that were was a large stone circle here. Sadly most of these were removed to be used as gateposts, lintels etc.

Although difficult to spot amongst the heather what remains is also, I think, in need of a wee exploration. There is a kerb underneath the heather that goes round the almost 16m wide site. Some of kerbs also look to long and thin, possibly did they stood at some time? I'd like to think so. Nearby are some hut circles set in a field system.

I love the countryside round here, smooth hills and severe climbs all mixed up with some wonderful ancient sites. Stony Hill has the views and the route to most of these, the River Spey. The Spey has many fine attributes and amongst these are distilleries. It was time to go home and sample some.

Visited 14/7/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2017ce

Stony Hill (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Stony Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Stony Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Stony Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Stony Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Stony Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Stony Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Stony Hill</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2017ce

Round Howe (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

The Round Howe goes into the category 'of about to go'. It has been quarried, houked, and had its west side removed by a track. What survives lies beside a fence in a terrible state. Stones can be seen lying about in a circular area of about 10m but not much can be seen else except the view.

Leaving the A941 take the Archiestown road west, the B9102. Take the first minor road heading north west and keep going until it ends. From here head south past the Whiteacen Farm and jump the fence being careful not to jump straight into a ditch.

Not much to see which is a pity, an echo from a distant past.

Visited 14/7/2-17.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2017ce

Round Howe (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Round Howe</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Round Howe</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2017ce

Knockandu Church/Knowehillock (Stone Circle) — Fieldnotes

The stone circle at Knowehillock, NJ 1937 4335, was destroyed between the years 1830 and 1870. Like the Hill Of Milleath I was intrigued to see if anything was left and just like the Hill Of Milleath it was a nightmare to find but survivors might remain.

One of the stones supposedly ended up in the Elchies Tomb located in the very modern Knockando church yard. My favourite, Stone 2, is located nearest to the church front door. Stone 1 is on the opposite whilst Stone 3, the most recent burial and least favourite is nearest the church yard entrance.

For the church yard leave the B9102 and head through Cardhu and its excellent distillery. Follow the signs to the church and the Elchies Tomb is near the entrance.

For Knowehillock, where nothing can be seen, head north from Cardhu up a track. Go over, or in my case into accidentally, the Cardow Burn. Follow the track to its end, the site location being slightly to the north and covered in trees. This would have been a stunning site back in the day with even more stunning views of the Spey Side Valley and the Highlands.

Visited 14/7/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2017ce

Knockandu Church/Knowehillock (Stone Circle) — Miscellaneous

There is no trace of this stone circle in a re-afforested area. There is no knowledge at Carron House of the stone which went there in the early 20th century, but the minister of Knockando parish church (Information from R Prentice, The Manse, Knockando) believes that one of the grave stones in the Grants of Carron burial enclosure known as "The Elchies Tomb", in the churchyard, came from the stone circle. There are two erect monoliths in the enclosure, one inscribed with the date 1934, and the other with the date 1940; it is possible that one of them is the stone which originally went to Carron House.

Canmore.

(one problem with this, there are three.)
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2017ce

Knockandu Church/Knowehillock (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>Knockandu Church/Knowehillock</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Knockandu Church/Knowehillock</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Knockandu Church/Knowehillock</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Knockandu Church/Knowehillock</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Knockandu Church/Knowehillock</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Knockandu Church/Knowehillock</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Knockandu Church/Knowehillock</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Knockandu Church/Knowehillock</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Knockandu Church/Knowehillock</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2017ce

Cossack Wood (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Follow the B9102, west from the A941 (north of Craigellachie), Archiestown road, and stop at the junction after Woodside farm. Plenty room to park as this is also a council yard only used in winter time. Piles of grit indicating what this place is used for. The minor road south leads to the Carron distillery and on the way here the MacAllan distillery is passed. Very important these roads are kept open.

As for the cairn, sadly, hardly any of it remains in its woodland location. Other smaller cairns, nearby, have long gone. What is left in a beautiful wood clearing is a circular heather covered area. Parts of a possible kerb hide underneath the vegetation in this rapidly decreasing spot of around 10m wide. On the plus side some have visited here as a few ribbons hang from trees, a possible indicator of former glories.

From the junction head south eastish for a walk that seemed to last a long time. Bogs, streams and fallen trees making walking conditions hazardous.

Visited 14/7/2017.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2017ce

Cossack Wood (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Cossack Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Cossack Wood</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2017ce

Brin School (Barrow / Cairn Cemetery) — Images

<b>Brin School</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Brin School</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Brin School</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Brin School</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Brin School</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Brin School</b>Posted by drewbhoy drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th July 2017ce

Offerberg (Round Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Visited: July 17. 2017

Just a couple of kilometres west of the village of Rolde in Drenthe, in a secluded field, stands a striking Iron Age tomb called the Offerberg. This name means 'Hill of Sacrifices' on account of the ancient cremation remains found there.

The site stands beneath the canopy of a large tree in the middle of a large field of grazing cattle but cannot be approached directly on account of a perimeter electric fence.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
20th July 2017ce

Offerberg (Round Cairn) — Images

<b>Offerberg</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Offerberg</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Offerberg</b>Posted by LesHamilton LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
20th July 2017ce

Newgrange (Passage Grave) — Links

Mythical Ireland - Newgrange folklore


"The earliest antiquarians who visited, documented, sketched and spoke about Newgrange sometimes get a hard time from the modern academic establishment. The writings of Lhwyd and Molyneux and Pownall and Vallancey are all criticised for one reason or another (poor Charles Vallancey is largely ridiculed, perhaps because he referred to Newgrange as a Mithraic temple). All of the early antiquarian accounts of the monument are valuable for one reason or another. Some of them have captured aspects of the monument that have disappeared since they wrote. Without the tools and techniques of modern archaeology, all of them were poking around in the dark, so to speak. They couldn't have known the true age of Newgrange, nor could they have appreciated the skills of the artists and builders who created it, those whom they all too often referred to as barbarous. .... "
tjj Posted by tjj
20th July 2017ce

Yr Allor (Kerbed Cairn) — Images

<b>Yr Allor</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Yr Allor</b>Posted by thesweetcheat thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
20th July 2017ce
Showing 1-50 of 124,513 posts. Most recent first | Next 50