The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Rimbeck - Warburg (Chambered Tomb) — Fieldnotes

The gallery grave of Rimbeck - Warburg lies northeast of the village Rimbeck and belongs to the Hessian-Westphalian galleries. To reach the site leave the B7 into Elisabethstrasse, after about 430m when the road bends to left continue straight ahead into Zur Märk. After about 250m there is a slight right bend and you are in the road Zum Weissen Holz. Continue on this road for about 500m until you reach the forest. Park here and use the middle forest track which goes uphill for about 450m, where a little beaten path leaves the main track to the left. You should notice the information board of the tomb from here.

The 12 m long and 2 m wide gallery grave is embedded in the ground. While the supporting stones are largely preserved, no capstones were found. The site originally consisted of a chambered tomb completely covered with stone slabs, which lay under a mound and only connected to the outside world by a short corridor with a Port-hole slab (German: Seelenloch) still visible today.

The large pieces of rock from sandstone, which served as the building material, do not occur at the site. They had to be brought over a distance of 3.5km.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Rimbeck - Warburg (Chambered Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Rimbeck - Warburg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Rimbeck - Warburg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Rimbeck - Warburg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Rimbeck - Warburg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Rimbeck - Warburg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Rimbeck - Warburg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Rimbeck - Warburg</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Hertingshausen (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

The menhir of Hertingshausen is located on the edge of a small wood, north of the K22 between Baunatal and Hertingshausen. It is a strangely wedged shaped 2m high stone that looks like much of it has broken away and is now missing.

Like the Hünstein - Großenritte in Baunatal this menhir consists of quartzite, which was probably broken from the Hertingshäuser cliffs.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Hünstein - Großenritte (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Fieldnotes

The Hünstein of Großenritte is now located at the Hünsteinplatz in the midst of a relatively new residential estate in Baunatal in the district of Großenritte. It is 2,75m high and weights about four tons.

It consists of a quartzite that is not present here. A material analysis showed that the Hünstein was probably broken from the Hertingshäuser cliffs, which are about 3.8km away.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Hünstein - Großenritte (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Hünstein - Großenritte</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hünstein - Großenritte</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hünstein - Großenritte</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hünstein - Großenritte</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hünstein - Großenritte</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Hertingshausen (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Images

<b>Hertingshausen</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Hertingshausen</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Lautariusgrab - Gudensberg (Chambered Tomb) — Fieldnotes

The gallery grave Lautariusgrab (Gudensberg) lies about 500m southeast of the L3218 road between Metze and Edermünde. There is a car park (Gestecke) where a forest track to the tomb starts.

The tomb has a rectangular layout of 10m long and 5m wide, it is assumed that the tomb was not covered with stones, but with wood.

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Taken from one of the (red) information board:

The Lautariusgrab is a prehistoric cultural monument from the Neolithic Wartberg culture in the Gudensberger city forest. The origin of the name is unclear.

The prehistoric site consists of an above-ground burial chamber with two open antechambers. The tomb is unique in northern Hesse because of its shape and the purely aboveground construction. Other plants of the Wartberg culture are the gallery tombs of Züschen and Calden, which were partially sunk into a slight slope or covered with a mound. The tomb has a rectangular layout with a length of 10 m and a width of 5 m. It was probably covered with wood. The processed stones are made of quartzite and basalt. The floor of the grave was paved.

Settlements of the Wartberg culture are less than a kilometer away on the Gudensberger Bürgel and Güntersberg.

In 1932 the tomb was first uncovered and examined. Only a few skeletal remains in the form of bone fragments, a few fragments of cups and two stone ax made of siliceous rock were found. This small number of finds is explained by the above-ground construction and the rapid decay after ritual use. It makes dating difficult, but it can be assumed that the grave dates from around 3500-3000 BC. Chr. The finds are today kept in the Hessian State Museum in Kassel.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Lautariusgrab - Gudensberg (Chambered Tomb) — Images

<b>Lautariusgrab - Gudensberg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Lautariusgrab - Gudensberg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Lautariusgrab - Gudensberg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Lautariusgrab - Gudensberg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Lautariusgrab - Gudensberg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Lautariusgrab - Gudensberg</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Lautariusgrab - Gudensberg</b>Posted by Nucleus Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
18th August 2018ce

Coumeraglinmountain Megalithic Tomb (unclassified) (Chambered Tomb) — Miscellaneous

From archaeology.ie:

Description: Located in a fold on a steep W-facing slope overlooking a shelf on the E side of the ravine of the N-S Araglin River, with the stream c. 400m to the W. This is a wedge-shaped chamber (L 1.45m NE-SW; Wth 0.6m at NE to 0.8m at SW; H 0.5m) roofed by two lintels. The SE wall has two orthostats and some drystone walling, but the NW side is constructed entirely of drystone walling, apart from one upright at the SW end. There is a single backstone at NE. The chamber opens into a court (dims. c. 4m NE-SW; c. 2.8m NW-SE) defined by drystone walling with some uprights that are not set in the ground, and the court is likely to be a secondary feature.

Compiled by: Michael Moore. Date of upload: 6th May, 2011.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
17th August 2018ce

Ballynamona Lower (Court Tomb) — Images

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17th August 2018ce

Züschen I (Chambered Tomb) — Fieldnotes

Züschen I, classified as a gallery grave or a Hessian-Westphalian stone cist, lies east of Züschen and north of the road L3218 to Lohne. There is a small car park about 100m south of the tomb. According to Wikipedia the German term of gallery grave for a certain type of megalithic sites is derived from the French term Allée couverte.

The rectangular chamber is 20m long and 3.5m wide. It is built of rectangular sandstone slabs, which can't be found on this valley side of the Elbebach. Each long wall consists of a row of 12 slabs, one of which is missing. The narrow walls consist of a single slab each. Some of the stones (b1 and b2) contain some incised carvings, comparable to prehistoric rock art elsewhere in Europe.

Due to increasing vandalism, like the engraving of names and signs, the tomb was roofed and fenced in 1986. According to the display panel, it is still possible to visit the tomb from inside, a key can be obtained from the museum in Fritzlar located in the Hochzeithaus (wedding house).

Visited July 2018
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
16th August 2018ce

Ballynamona Lower (Court Tomb) — Fieldnotes

We visited Ballynamona on a drizzly, mid-August day, a day untypical of the sunny summer we've had this year. Ballynamona is deep in the Waterford Gaelteacht, a place where the usual bi-lingual signposting is dropped and everything is in Irish only. However, this convention in turn is dropped when you get to the end of the driveable track, where one neighbour has seen fit to post a "BEWARE, ATTACK DOG LOOSE" sign right next to the last, tree-lined track that leads to the field where the tomb lies. This is very intimidating, and it almost worked, but I reckoned I would never come back here and I really wanted to see Ireland's most southerly court tomb, so with a bit of convincing and coaxing of 9-year-old LM we opened the gate and headed up the track (in the end there was no attack dog to be seen or heard, signs like these judiciously used to put off the intrepid amateur archaeologist and the stoner hippy alike).

At the end of the track we reached a barley field that had been harvested quite a while earlier in the year and headed over to where the tomb lies. I had expected a fenced-in tomb in a clearing at the side of the field, judging from the shots here and elsewhere. What we found, eventually, was a bracken, gorse and bramble covered neglected mess. The fence is gone, or buried under the bracken, and the bracken and gorse has overgrown the tomb.

I was disheartened and disappointed. The gallery of the tomb was visible, but all the court stones were inundated. I took a few shots and started to head off, saddened by the neglect and seeming disdain. We reached the edge of the barley field and talked about how we'd probably never return - this is an isolated spot, not really on the way to anywhere. LM asked me why I bother and I said without the likes of us, these sites could be lost altogether (there was a faint track to the tomb from the barley field so someone does come here occasionally).

We turned back and headed through the jungle. Neither of us were dressed for the brambles but we persevered. Rooting around by the large stone on the western arm of the court I found the Bord Fáilte sign and its post, dumped there unceremoniously. I used this to tamp down the bracken around the gallery to give it some breathing space. I also found one of the staves from the fence which I used to bash back some of the gorse and brambles. I tamped down the bracken within the chamber/gallery of the tomb with my feet. And there it was, quite an impressive court tomb, with stones remaining on both arms of its court and a fairly complete gallery. Uncovered and opened out, the tomb regained a bit more majesty and we were grateful to the ancestors for leaving this place for us.

Leaving, I felt a certain sense of self-justification – this stone-hunting is not everyone's cup of tea, it's mainly the domain of eccentrics and, eh, stoners. It flashes into the broader consciousness occasionally when a spectacular like the recent stuff at Newgrange and Dowth makes the news. And then it's forgotten about once again, left to the likes of LM and me to uncover once again, attack dogs in our own right.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
16th August 2018ce

Dunhill (Portal Tomb) — Images

<b>Dunhill</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Dunhill</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Dunhill</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Dunhill</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Dunhill</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Dunhill</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
16th August 2018ce

Dunhill (Portal Tomb) — Miscellaneous

From archaeology.ie:

Description: Situated in pasture on a fairly steep SE-facing slope of the N-S valley of the Annestown stream, which is c. 210m to the E. The roofstone (dims. 4m x 2.7m; T 1.2m) is supported by one orthostat. (Atkins 1896, 71-2; Borlase 1897, vol. 1, 57; Ó Nualláin 1983, 103)

The above description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Waterford' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1999). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

Compiled by: Michael Moore.

Date of upload/revision: 16th May 2011.

References:

1. Atkins, R. 1896 The rude stone monuments of our own and other lands. Waterford and South East of Ireland Archaeological Journal 2, 60-80, 131-61.
2. Borlase, W.C. 1897 The Dolmens of Ireland, 3 vols. London. Chapman and Hall, London.
3. Ó Nualláin, S. 1983 Irish portal tombs, topography, siting and distribution. Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland 113, 75-105.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
16th August 2018ce

Boar's Den (Round Barrow(s)) — Miscellaneous

Ascending Parbold Hill and proceeding eastward in the direction of Standish, says [Mr Price, honourary secretary of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire], a slight decent is made into the ravine called Sprodley Wood, locally known as Fairy Glen, and along this wood runs Sprodley Brook. Shortly after passing over Sprodley Brook, in a field on the left may be seen a grass-covered mound, which from time immemorial seems to have been called Boars Den.

[...] From this plateau a magnificent view presents itself at every point of the compass. Northwards, beyond the silver streak of the Ribble estuary, rise the Cumberland Hills; nearer, and trending eastwards, may be seen Pendle Hill, Bleasdale Moors, Longridge Fells, Rivington Pike, and Anglesark Moors; southwards, Standish, Billinge Beacon, and Ashurst; and westward stretches a vast plain, with the Welsh mountains faintly outlined across the Mersey estuary. Few sites in Lancashire could rival this in its command of the ancient landmarks and beacons of the county, and the estuaries of the Ribble, Mersey, and Dee.
In the Wigan Observer, 25th May 1904.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
16th August 2018ce

Ballynageeragh (Portal Tomb) — Images

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16th August 2018ce

Ballynageeragh (Portal Tomb) — Miscellaneous

From archaeology.ie:

Description: Situated in pasture on a broad plateau with a slight E-facing slope. An oval roofstone (dims. 4m x 2.65m; T 0.7m) is resting on the septal-slab and the backstone with a cushion-stone between the roofstone and the backstone. The tomb, which faces SW, lacks portal-stones but the sidestones are present. It was investigated and conserved in 1939-40 when cremated bone, flint and charcoal were found in the chamber (Herity 1964). (Du Noyer 1864-6, 480; Atkins 1896, 68-9; Ó Nualláin 1983, 103; Harbison 1992, 325)

The above description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Waterford' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1999). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

Compiled by: Michael Moore.

Date of upload/revision: 13th May 2011.

This monument is subject to a preservation order made under the National Monuments Acts 1930 to 2014 (PO no. 63/1938).

References:

1. Atkins, R. 1896 The rude stone monuments of our own and other lands. Waterford and South East of Ireland Archaeological Journal 2, 60-80, 131-61.
2. Du Noyer, G.V. 1864-6 On cromleacs near Tramore in the County of Waterford; with remarks on the classification of ancient Irish earthen and megalithic structures. Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland 8, 474-82.
3. Harbison, P. 1992 Guide to the national and historic monuments of Ireland. Gill and Macmillan Ltd., Dublin.
4. Herity, M. 1964 The finds from the Irish portal dolmens. Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland 94, pt. 2, 123-44.
5. Ó Nualláin, S. 1983 Irish portal tombs, topography, siting and distribution. Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland 113, 75-105.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
16th August 2018ce

Ballynageeragh (Portal Tomb) — Images

<b>Ballynageeragh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Ballynageeragh</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
16th August 2018ce
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