The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Borgh (Standing Stones) — Fieldnotes

From Dun Cuier I made my way back down to the A888 and walked south to Borve. The remaining standing stone is easily spotted from the road so I jumped the fence and went for a look.

The stones that still stands, at a fairly jaunty angel, is almost 1.7m in length. The other is resting, a finely shaped stone, having a length of almost 3m.

Sadly you can imagine sand eventually covering the site, like a nearby cairn and some cairns that seem to have vanished.

Lovely setting.

Visited 10/07/2022.

Sligeanach (Chambered Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Slightly to the north of the 1 up and 1 down standing stone site at Borve is a grass covered mound described as a chamber cairn.

Only 4 stones can be seen, erosion or animal damage is on the north side which means there isn't much to see.

However, if you look to the east especially if you follow the Craigston road, some of Barras best sites will be found. To the west is the remains of Dun Cille.

Lovely location, it would be nice if the site was excavated.

Visited 10/07/2022.

Smoo Cave (Cave / Rock Shelter) — News

Rare tiny creatures uncovered in Highland caves


Rare microscopic crustaceans have been discovered in two caves in the Highlands.

More info :

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/cn03zjql1jro

Dun Bharpa (Chambered Cairn) — Images (click to view fullsize)

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Dun Cuier (Broch) — Links

Canmore


Canmore with superb aerial photography

Dun Cuier (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Agree with the Ts that this is the easiest of the duns/brochs to get to, except for the completely ruined Dun Cille to the south, and one of the best preserved.

After a morning hiking around sites north, I came over to the west coast to start the afternoon's 'traipsin aboot'.

I parked on the minor road at Allathasdal, thru the gae to the east, then head north jumping the Abhainn Mhuileann Domhaill, river for a dull mill.

Head north/north east and the site will quickly come into view. Superb all round views, South Uist can be seen in the north.

Beautiful place to visit and Canmore provide us with brilliant aerial photography which can be seen in the links section.

A must visit!

Visited 10/07/2022.

Aird Veenish (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

Parking can be found just after the cattle grid on the Ard Mhidhinis road. The head back west, jump the ditch, climb up, jump the fence keep heading up and look for a large green patch with scattered stones.

Much like Talamhanta and Balnacraig, I'd see the next day, parts of the monument are hard to decipher. I saw a few stones standing in the place someone thought was a stone circle, the cairn at NF70310373 looks like it has vanished but there are remnants at NF70290377. At this point I agree with one of Canmore's contributors who thought the site was a long cairn. I would also add that it has been severely trashed.

Various walls, enclosures have been been built, but several kerbs remain in the north east, some of the height is retained in the north but towards the south it tapers to nothing except green grass.

Walls have also been built and clearly some kind of 'but and ben' also. Just when you're about to give up something catches the eye. A cist, south, east and west slabs remain in place, an even harder to spot cist is mentioned by Canmore, after a good look the upright slabs are found, it is a cist but stones would have to be removed to give a clearer picture, a third cist couldn't be found.

Superb views east, on a clear day the Cuillins (Skye) and the mainland, to the north and south. Beinn Eireabhal to the west.

Not visually a great site, an interesting site deserving of a dig perhaps.

Visited 10/07/2022

Balnacraig (Chambered Cairn) — Images

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Dun Na Cille (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

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Knowe Of Swandro (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — Links

Swandro-Orkney Coastal Archaeology Trust


Knowe Of Swandro website.

Canmore


Like most places on Orkney it has been busy!

Knowe Of Swandro (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork) — News

Race to save Iron Age settlement in Orkney from the sea


Archaeologists in Orkney are in a race against time to excavate an Iron Age roundhouse before it is lost to the sea.

Video Report : https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-scotland-62408106

Sligeanach (Chambered Cairn) — Images

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The Macleod Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Folklore

A local farming family set up this huge standing stone, probably over 5,000 years ago. For the people who erected it, this stone represented their links with the land and their ancestors. They wouldn't have been known as MacLeods – that is a much more recent association.

The standing stone gave out a clear message: this land is well-used, it is ours and has been for generations. This was a rich land when Clach Mhic Leòid was erected in the prehistoric Neolithic period. The landscape was one of small-scale agriculture and open woodland. Any rough grazing or peat was confined to the high hills, and even the sea was some distance away.

Tradition sometimes associates standing stones with burials but archaeologists rarely, if ever, find contemporary evidence of burials at the base of single stones. It wasn't until around 4,500 to 3,800 years ago, in the later Neolithic and early Bronze Age, that individual burials became common-place.

Nevertheless, it is possible that Clach Mhic Leòid continued to be important to the local people, even as times and beliefs changed. There are a number of large stones showing through the turf close to this magnificent slab. Was the area eventually used as a place of burial? Without archaeological investigation we will never know. Nevertheless, the medieval naming of the stone, Mhic Leòid, reflects valued links with the distant past.

The MacLeods of Harris and Dunvegan were the clan chiefs who held Harris from the 13th or 14th centuries until the late 1700s. Perhaps the clan name was given to this standing stone to link the MacLeods to long-departed ancestors, real or imaginary, and thereby emphasise their right to power over the land and the people.

By Jill Harden

Borgh (Standing Stones) — Images

<b>Borgh</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Borgh</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Borgh</b>Posted by drewbhoy<b>Borgh</b>Posted by drewbhoy
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Still doing the music, following that team and getting lost in the hills! (Some Simple Minds, Glasvegas, Athlete, George Harrison, Empire Of The Sun, Riverside, Porcupine Tree, Nazareth on the headphones, good boots and sticks, away I go!)

Turriff, Aberdeenshire

https://www.thedeleriumtrees.com/

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