The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Wentwood Barrows (Round Barrow(s))

'Appalling damage' to Newport ancient burial mound


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-51013596
nix Posted by nix
7th January 2020ce

Airigh Na Beinne Bige (Stone Circle)

Lewis stone circle has star-shaped lightning strike


Evidence of a "massive" lightning strike has been found at the centre of a stone circle in the Western Isles.

A single large strike, or many smaller ones on the same spot, left a star-shaped magnetic anomaly at the 4,000-year-old site in Lewis.

Scientists made the discovery at Site XI or Airigh na Beinne Bige, a hillside stone circle now consisting of a single standing stone.

The site is at the famous Calanais Standing Stones.

Scientists said the lightning strike, which was indentified in a geophysics survey, could show a potential link between the construction of ancient stone circles and the forces of nature.

They said the lightning struck some time before peat enveloped the stone circle at Site XI 3,000 years ago. The discovery is detailed in new research published online.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-50891787
moss Posted by moss
24th December 2019ce

Denmark (Country)

Neolithic chewing gum helps recreate image of ancient Dane


Analysis of birch tar describes a female hunter-gatherer with dark skin and blue eyes

At the dawn of the Neolithic era, a young woman discarded a lump of ancient chewing gum made from birch tar into a shallow, brackish lagoon that drew fishers to the coast of southern Denmark.

Nearly 6,000 years later, researchers excavating the site spotted the gum amid pieces of wood and wild animal bone and from it have reassembled her complete DNA and so painted the broadest strokes of her portrait.

More: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/dec/17/neolithic-dna-ancient-chewing-gum-denmark?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other
ryaner Posted by ryaner
17th December 2019ce

Traprain Law (Hillfort)

Traprain Law Silver 100th Anniversary of its discovery


Had the fantastic pleasure of a brilliant lecture from Dr Fraser Hunter with stunning slides (in amazing resolution) at Lanark on Monday 9th December.

https://blog.nms.ac.uk/2019/05/12/a-century-of-silver-the-traprain-treasure-on-its-hundredth-birthday/

There is a new, rather pricey book coming out. The images are simply stunning and the finds shed new light on the context of Traprain from Bronze Age through to the Iron Age. Maybe one for the Santa wishlist.

https://www.bookdepository.com/Late-Roman-Silver-Treasure-from-Traprain-Law-Fraser-Hunter/9781910682234

Another very recent find (from some lovely Detectorists) over in Fife.

https://blog.nms.ac.uk/2017/08/01/rebuilding-roman-silver-a-fantastic-find-from-fife/
Howburn Digger Posted by Howburn Digger
11th December 2019ce

Eire

Why have thousands of archaeological sites ‘disappeared’?


While the archaeologists have been busy finding new monuments of interest, the State has been busy facilitating their systematic removal

Mon, Dec 9, 2019, 05:00

Mark Clinton

According to the legal definition, there are five alternative criteria under which a monument qualifies as a national monument. Defying alphabetical order, “historical interest” is the first listed criterion. In 2003 the Carrickmines Castle site was recognised as a national monument before the Supreme Court. And now we are launching the history of the settlement and fortification, its long-term occupants the Walshes, their cousins in Shanganagh, Kilgobbin, Balally, etc, and, among many other players, that of the besieger of Carrickmines in March 1642, Sir Simon Harcourt. It is a colourful story, with a big finale. Truly, a site worthy of its national monument status.

And yet, the site, the national monument, is no more, save for some sad remnants, scattered about a busy roundabout. Ah yes, the Carrickmines junction. A junction not connecting with any national routes or, indeed, with a road of any significance. A junction whose planning origins remain unknown despite the best efforts of the Flood-Mahon tribunal. One of a daisy-chain of junctions along a motorway originally designed to carry national traffic unimpeded around Dublin city. A junction that effectively destroyed the integrity of the national monument. How did this happen?

The National Monuments Act, passed in 1930, brought legal protection to our ancient built heritage. On a number of subsequent occasions the Act was amended and strengthened to remove weaknesses and loopholes. Particular credit should go to former ministers Michael D Higgins and Síle de Valera for their significant contributions to the protective legislation.

More: https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/why-have-thousands-of-archaeological-sites-disappeared-1.4103381?fbclid=IwAR3zs9yezDZ02D85XGVIGsLazia-AuDR9RKcSbQfQoqKtXJInbP2dMVHCTo
ryaner Posted by ryaner
11th December 2019ce

Clava Cairns

Public help document damage to historic Scottish sites


Members of the public are helping to document the effects of weather and vandalism at some of Scotland's most historic sites.

More info :

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-50670902
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
7th December 2019ce

West Mainland

9 possible BA figurines found


Found during work at the Finstown sub-station "A team from ORCA Archaeology, carrying out exploratory excavations at the proposed site of an electrical substation development in Orkney, has unearthed nine, half-metre tall stone-carved objects." https://www.orkney.com/news/finstown-finds plenty of lovely images shown
wideford Posted by wideford
6th December 2019ce

East Yorkshire

Iron Age shield found in Pocklington


The remarkably well preserved bronze shield, with a swirling pattern design, formed part of a unique chariot burial, which also contained the upright skeletons of two ponies found on a building site at Pocklington in 2018.

Its owner, a highly regarded member of his community, was in his late 40s or older when he died, between 320BC to 174BC.

He was given a spectacular send-off, with his body placed in the chariot behind the horses, placed to look as if they were leaping out of the grave.


https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/heritage/iron-age-shield-found-in-pocklington-is-one-of-most-important-ancient-finds-this-millennium-1-10137418
moss Posted by moss
5th December 2019ce

Herefordshire

Detectorists hid find that rewrites Anglo-Saxon history


An expert gasped when he saw coins unearthed by two men now convicted of theft

On a sunny day in June 2015 amateur metal detectorists George Powell and Layton Davies were hunting for treasure in fields at a remote spot in Herefordshire.

The pair had done their research carefully and were focusing on a promising area just north of Leominster, close to high land and a wood with intriguing regal names – Kings Hall Hill and Kings Hall Covert.

More: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/nov/21/detectorists-hid-find-that-rewrites-anglo-saxon-history
ryaner Posted by ryaner
21st November 2019ce

County Donegal

Hoard of the Rings - Bronze Age treasure on display


The heaviest intact prehistoric gold hoard ever found in Ireland has gone on public display at the
Donegal County Museum in Letterkenny.

More: https://www.rte.ie/news/ulster/2019/1119/1092820-donegal-gold-hoard/
ryaner Posted by ryaner
19th November 2019ce
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