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Scotland

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<b>Scotland</b>Posted by theloniousBalnacraig © thelonious
To make it easier for contributors to add new sites, the pages for Scotland are currently being reorganised according to the present Scottish Council areas.
A map of these can be seen on the Gazetteer for Scotland website.
Also known as:
  • Alba

See individual sites for details


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Web searches for Scotland

Sites/Groups in this region:

63 posts
778 sites
Aberdeenshire
7 posts
159 sites
Angus
1 post
61 sites
Argyll and Bute (Islands)
6 posts
363 sites
Argyll and Bute (Mainland)
297 sites
Central Scotland
10 posts
272 sites
Dumfries and Galloway
9 posts
62 sites
Fife
167 sites
Highland (Islands)
60 posts
636 sites
Highland (Mainland)
4 posts
100 sites
Moray
101 posts
318 sites
Orkney
30 posts
425 sites
Perth and Kinross
3 posts
115 sites
Scottish Borders
8 posts
69 sites
The Shetland Isles
1 post
17 sites
South Ayrshire
8 posts
69 sites
Stirling
2 posts
177 sites
The Western Isles

News

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Artists draw on Scotland's Neolithic past

Artists have drawn on Scotland's Neolithic past to create a series of new illustrations.

More info :

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-47893306
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
12th April 2019ce

Dig at one of Scotland's largest hunter-gatherer site

Archaeologists have carried out a dig at one of Scotland's biggest and most significant hunter-gatherer sites.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-47386160
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
27th February 2019ce

Warm weather reveals previously unknown archaeology

Archaeologists say recent dry weather has given them the best chance since 1976 to detect new sites from the air.

More info :

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-44812713
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
13th July 2018ce

Archaeologists unearth amazing finds on Aberdeen bypass

Artefacts and structures found during archaeological excavations on the Aberdeen Western Peripheral Route project are shedding light on land use and settlement in the north east over the past 15,000 years, including Mesolithic pits, Roman bread ovens, prehistoric roundhouses and a cremation complex.

Full story here.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
27th February 2018ce
Edited 27th February 2018ce

Climate change risk to 28 historic sites in Scotland

Landmark Scottish castles and chapels are among 28 historic sites at "very high risk" from climate change, according to a new report.

A further 160 properties were found to be at "high risk" from flooding, coastal erosion and slope instability.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-42687874

Including some prehistoric sites in Shetland and Orkney.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th January 2018ce

Heritage 'angel' award winners revealed

The winners of the Scottish Heritage Angel awards have been revealed.

(Good to see Whithorn and in particular Leslie Merriman receive awards)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-south-scotland-41638223
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th October 2017ce

Stonehenge builders 'ate food from Scotland'

The "army of builders" of Stonehenge ate animals brought from as far away as the north east of Scotland, according to a new exhibition at the famous Neolithic site in Wiltshire.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-41669774
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th October 2017ce

Heritage 'angel' contenders across Scotland revealed

A shortlist of 12 nominees in four different categories has been revealed for the annual Scottish Heritage Angel Awards.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-south-scotland-41415926

Whithorn Roundhouse worth a vote but then again they are all excellent.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
29th September 2017ce

"Return" of 2,500 yr old Ballachulish Goddess


http://www.scotsman... continues...
tjj Posted by tjj
28th August 2017ce
Edited 28th August 2017ce

History in the hills: on the trail of Scotland's prehistoric rock carvings

Article on The Guardian online travel page today...

https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2017/jun/19/scotland-prehistoric-rock-carvings-walking-holidays?CMP=twt_gu
1speed Posted by 1speed
19th June 2017ce

£65m Bill To Preserve Historic Sites

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-38553858
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
9th January 2017ce

Digs Funded At 'Lost Kingdoms' In Scotland and Ireland

Great news!!!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-38328698
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
17th December 2016ce

Amateur archaeologist finds ‘phenomenal’ trove of rock engravings


From The Guardian...

"An amateur archaeologist has tracked down hundreds of prehistoric rock engravings in Scotland in what has been described as a “phenomenal” contribution to the understanding of Britain’s earliest artworks... continues...
1speed Posted by 1speed
26th September 2016ce

Database of Scotland's ancient rock art to be created.


"A digital database of Scotland's Neolithic and early Bronze Age rock art is to be created.

About 6,000 rocks are known in Britain to have ancient cup and ring carvings. More than 2,000 of the sites are found in Scotland... continues...
harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
30th June 2016ce
Edited 1st July 2016ce

Nan Shepherd to appear on Scottish bank note


Great news! Scientist Mary Somerville too.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-36111759

Robert Macfarlane, writer and Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, welcomed the choice of Ms Shepherd for the £5 note... continues...
tjj Posted by tjj
25th April 2016ce

Hunter-gatherers roamed Cairngorms 10,000 years ago

Excavations at sites deep in the glens, on the National Trust for Scotland’s (NTS) Mar Lodge Estate in Aberdeenshire, have produced radiocarbon dates which demonstrate a human presence as far back as 8,100 BCE.

Report:
The Scotsman
BBC News
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
10th July 2015ce
Edited 13th July 2015ce

Earliest evidence of the presence of humans in Scotland found in South Lanarkshire


From Historic Scotland:

9 April 2014 Archaeologists have uncovered the earliest evidence of the presence of humans in Scotland it was announced today... continues...
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
9th April 2014ce

Scottish heritage bodies to merge


TWO of Scotland's main heritage bodies are to merge, it has been confirmed.

The Scottish Government published a strategy document for the "historic environment" yesterday as Fiona Hyslop, the culture secretary, launched a Bill to address the management of the nation's built heritage... continues...
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
7th March 2014ce

RCAHMS Review Update (April)

News for the Scots to think about.

http://www.rcahms.gov.uk/news/rcahms-review-update-april
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
25th April 2012ce

Scottish prehistoric mummies made from jigsaw of body parts


DNA tests on British prehistoric mummies revealed they were made of body parts from several different people, arranged to look like one person.

The four bodies discovered in 2001 on South Uist, in Scotland's Outer Hebrides were the first evidence in Britain of deliberate mummification... continues...
1speed Posted by 1speed
22nd August 2011ce
Edited 22nd August 2011ce

Scotland's World Heritage Sites Celebration Planned

Scotlands 5 World Heritage sites are to link up with a series of interactive events exploring the theme of cultural identity. Includes Neolithic Orkney.

More info :

Http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-12800371
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
21st March 2011ce

Reclusive American leaves Scotland his £2.5m fortune


A 79 year old recluse has left his fortune to the National Trust of Scotland. He had never visited apparently and his conception of Scotland was based on the film Brigadoon. His only friend, the barber, got the pug and a vet's bill.

continues...
tjj Posted by tjj
7th January 2011ce

Attractions Have Best Season On Record

Visitor numbers soar at the nation's historic sites.

Mentioned are Skara Brae plus Edinburgh and Urquhart Castles both at one time hillforts.

More info :

http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/Article.aspx/2056882
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
21st December 2010ce
Edited 21st December 2010ce

Scotland countryside petition


Ramblers Scotland is backing a petition to force a Scottish Government review on unsightly vehicular hill tracks and electrified deer fencing in the Scottish countryside. "Neither requires planning permission and both cause scars on our wild landscapes" says Helen todd, Ramblers Scotland's development officer... continues...
tjj Posted by tjj
9th June 2010ce
Edited 9th June 2010ce

Mathematical analysis of Scottish Stone Art points to lost language?


At New Scientist web site:

"Elaborate symbols and ornate depictions of animals carved in stone by an ancient Scottish people have given up their secret – to mathematics. Statistical analysis reveals that the shapes are a forgotten written language... continues...
mascot Posted by mascot
1st April 2010ce
Edited 1st April 2010ce

Iron Age Gold Goes On Public View


Four solid gold Iron Age neck ornaments which were found by an amateur metal detector have gone on display. Here is the BBC video

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/scotland_video_and_audio/8470436... continues...
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
20th January 2010ce
Edited 20th January 2010ce

Ancient arrowhead a 'chance find' at Sutherland school


Archaeologists have made what they described as a "chance discovery" of a stone arrowhead in the garden of a ruined schoolhouse in Sutherland.

Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (Guard) said it may have been dropped by a hunter... continues...
The Eternal Posted by The Eternal
16th January 2010ce
Edited 16th January 2010ce

Canmore database modernized!


In a silent move, the RCAHMS switched to a state-of-the-art update of the good old Canmore database on 11th March 2009.
It really looks much better and there are obvious advantages over the old format like direct access instead of a log-in procedure and, when available, a 10-digit gridref... continues...
rockartuk Posted by rockartuk
13th March 2009ce
Edited 13th March 2009ce

Discovery & Excavation in Scotland online

Now downloadable at http://ads.ahds.ac.uk/catalogue/library/des/index.cfm as a .pdf for each year from 1947-2001. However these are facsimiles, so you really need to know which year you want as these won't be truly searchable
wideford Posted by wideford
23rd October 2007ce

10,000 historic sites at risk from climate change


MORE THAN 10,000 of the most important ancient and historical sites around Scotland's coastline are at risk of being destroyed by the storms and rising sea levels that will come with global warming.

Sites in jeopardy include the neolithic settlement of Skara Brae on Orkney and the prehistoric ruins at Jarlshof on Shetland... continues...
moss Posted by moss
24th September 2007ce

J.W. Cursiter collection online

The Hunterian museum is re-assembling his(mostly Northern Isles) donation and adding this to their catalogue as they go http://www.huntsearch.gla.ac.uk
At present this is text-only but images will be added over the coming months
wideford Posted by wideford
3rd August 2007ce

Scotland's magical ancient circles leave Stonehenge standing


http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/index... continues...
nickbrand Posted by nickbrand
3rd November 2006ce
Edited 30th August 2007ce

Heatwave reveals Scotland's past


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/edinburgh_and_east/5270594.stm

A heatwave has revealed fleeting traces of early settlements to historians taking a bird's eye view of Scotland... continues...
nickbrand Posted by nickbrand
22nd August 2006ce
Edited 1st September 2007ce

Folklore

Add folklore Add folklore
The name "Thunderbolt" was also given in Scotland to stone axes until within recent years. A finely formed axe of aphanite found in Berwickshire, and presented to the Museum in 1876, was obtained about twenty years before from a blacksmith in whose smithy it had long lain. It was known in the district as "the thunderbolt," and had probably been preserved in the belief that it had fallen from the sky.

In Shetland stone axes were said to protect from thunder the houses inwhich they were preserved. One found at Tingwall was acquired from an old woman in Scalloway, who believed it to be a "thunderbolt," and "of efficacy in averting evil from the dwelling in which it was kept;" while another, believed to have "fallen from the skies during a thunderstorm," was preserved in the belief that "it brought good luck to the house."

In the North-East of Scotland they "were coveted as the sure bringers of success, provided they were not allowed to fall to the ground."

In the British Museum there is a very fine axe of polished green quartz, mounted in silver, which is stated to have been sewed to a belt which was worn round the waist by a Scottish officer as a cure for kidney disease.

The late Sir Daniel Wilson mentions an interesting tradition regarding the large perforated stone hammers, which he says were popularly known in Scotland almost till the close of last century as "Purgatory Hammers," for the dead to knock with at the gates of Purgatory.
From 'Scottish Charms and Amulets' by Geo. F. Black. (In v27 of PSAS -1893, p433).
You can check out his sources in the footnotes at
http://ads.ahds.ac.uk/catalogue/adsdata/PSAS_2002/pdf/vol_027/27_433_526.pdf
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
11th June 2008ce

Mr. Stuart adverted to the varying circumstances under which flint arrowheads were found. The popular belief which long regarded them as "elf-darts," and which was not confined to Scotland, had been expressed by the well-known Scottish geographer, Robert Gordon of Straloch, about two centuries ago. After giving some details about them, he adds that these wonderful stones are sometimes found in the fields, and in public and beaten roads, but never by searching for them; to-day perhaps one will be found where yesterday nothing could be seen, and in the afternoon in places where before noon there was none, and this most freqently under clear skies and in summer days. He then gives instances related to him by a man and woman of credit, each of whom while riding found an arrowhead in their clothes in this unexpected way.
Described on p174 of 'The Gentleman's Magazine' Jan-June 1861.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
15th September 2007ce
Edited 15th September 2007ce

Miscellaneous

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MAINLAND SITES IN OLD ORKNEY NEWSPAPER REPORTS

Ackergill Links ND35NW 9
November 1st 1864 "The Orcadian" excavation of cists by Mr Laing April 24th 1866 "The Orcadian" Petrie says the mound is natural September 18th 1866 "The Orcadian" Laing gives reasons why Long Mound is not wholly natural

Birkle Hills ? ND35NW 5 ?
October 3rd 1865 "The Orcadian" from "John O'Groat's Journal"

Birkle Hills ND35NW 5
October 3rd 1865 "The Orcadian" from "John O'Groat's Journal"
April 24th 1866 "The Orcadian"
September 18th 1866 "The Orcadian"
October 18th 1893 "Orkney Herald"

Dingwall
December 3rd 1870 "The Orcadian" previous Tuesday 2 E/W aligned cists found 6' apart in gravelly eminence at W end of Dingwall a few feet under clay subsoil. One disturbed previously, other had two decorated urns in fragments with human bones at eastern end

Ha' of Bowermadden ND26SW 7
October 3rd 1865 "The Orcadian" from "John O'Groat's Journal"

Keiss North/White ND36SE 3 Keiss White Gate Broch
October 18th 1893 "Orkney Herald"

Keiss Road ND36SW 1 Churchyard Mound / Churchyard Road Broch / Kirk Toft
September 18th 1866 "The Orcadian"
October 18th 1893 "Orkney Herald"

Keiss South ND36SE 2 Harbour Mound
October 18th 1893 "Orkney Herald"

Kettleburn ND35SW 11
November 8th 1864 "The Orcadian" from "John O'Groat's Journal" cists have been found in adjacent field on Long Hills ridge October 3rd 1865 "The Orcadian" from "John O'Groat's Journal" referred to as only properly explored broch in Caithness, dug by Henry Rhind

Kirkatahos
April 24th 1866 "The Orcadian" worked iron fragment found in chambered tomb in middle of Kirkatahos moor on hill/ridge

Long Hills
November 8th 1864 "The Orcadian" from "John O'Groat's Journal" in next field to Kettleburn broch 4' by 3' cinerary cist found on Long Hills ridge. Similar cists have come from the ridge in the past and a bronze brooch found in one by landowner James Henderson of Bilbister sent to Society of Antiquaries museum

Thurso ND16NW 17
July 22nd 1896 Orkney Herald" discovery location and description
Yarrows
November 1st 1864 "The Orcadian" roughly 2 years before Ackergill Links ND35NW 9 dug J.G.T. Sinclair of Ulbster excavated Bronze Age cist in conical mound on a hill summit in Yarrows with skeleton similarly interred with shore material brought from some distance away. Found with bronze spearhead, 10" long porphyry lance-head, black clay-slate.battle axe with 7" blade, porphyry knife and arrowheads, broken black stone knife and a mallet head broken at the ends

Wester Broch ? ND35NW 4 ?
October 3rd 1865 "The Orcadian" from "John O'Groat's Journal"

Wester Broch ND35NW 4 Keiss Wester Broch
October 3rd 1865 "The Orcadian" from "John O'Groat's Journal"
April 24th 1866 "The Orcadian"
September 18th 1866 "The Orcadian"
October 18th 1893 "Orkney Herald" reporters did not have time to look at
wideford Posted by wideford
21st January 2016ce
Edited 21st January 2016ce

Insular stone Circles :-
In a talk on Wednesday by Colin Richards his subject was the Stone Circles in Orkney and Lewis, which contrary to expectation turned out to be of different natures and for different purposes. Those in Orkney are constructed of material from seperate areas (Stones of Stenness five different sandstones, Ring of Brodgar twelve different geologies in distinct segments of the circle that significantly aren't always curved arcs) whilst those on Lewis are built of rock from their immediate vicinity (also the evidence is that both Orcadian circles were intentionally incomplete, from which he infers the rituals of the construction were an end in themselves). His ?new idea is that those on Orkney had place as the key factor (place of origin, spatial community) whilst those on Lewis had folk as the key factor (family, dispersed community [moiety ?] }.
From which is extrapolated that our obsession with geometry and algnments isn't theirs, that what looks incomplete to us is meant as is, and that whatever comes after is most likely not the original intent, that being the construction process itself.
wideford Posted by wideford
16th May 2008ce
Edited 16th May 2008ce

Links

Add a link Add a link

shoreUPDATE


The interactive website of SHARP, Scotland's Coastal Heritage At Risk Register. News, events, interactive map of the 940+ sites at highest risk. Report via it any deterioration. A useful and worthy resource. Some of those sites may undoubtedly be yet to added to TMA too.
spencer Posted by spencer
16th January 2017ce

Rampant Scotland


A fine collection of Scottish archaeological websites, many with prehistoric-related contents
spencer Posted by spencer
3rd December 2016ce

Forestry Commission For Scotland


Handy enough site this and some prehistoric places as well including Clune Wood.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
24th August 2012ce

The Heritage Journal: Scubi's Scottish Adventures: Part 4. Tomb of the Eagles


"I left Banks very happy and made my way to the Tomb of the Eagles. In comparison to Banks this place seems better organised in terms of signage and parking. I paid my entry fee (£6.80 I think it was) and was led into an adjoining room where a member of the staff was talking to a small group of visitors about the tomb."
Littlestone Posted by Littlestone
8th July 2011ce
Edited 8th July 2011ce

The Heritage Journal: Scubi's Scottish Adventures: Part 3. Banks Tomb


"I was awoken at 5am by some other person arriving and parking right next to me with their radio blasting out… what is it with people and their need to make as much noise as possible regardless of what other people might think… I was very glad when the ferry arrived and I booked in, boarded and sat down somewhere quiet."
Littlestone Posted by Littlestone
4th July 2011ce
Edited 4th July 2011ce

The Heritage Journal: Scubi's Scottish Adventures: Part 2


"After successfully transferring from train to bus and finally plane, I arrived in a reasonably sunny Inverness. It was about 4pm and after picking up the hire car I made my way towards the Bronze Age Clava Cairns, a short distance east from the city. On the way I noticed a sign for the Culloden battle field and decided to take a quick look (well, I was already going past it after all)..."
Littlestone Posted by Littlestone
16th June 2011ce
Edited 16th June 2011ce

Archaic sculpturings of cups, circles, &c. upon stones and rocks in Scotland


Archaic sculpturings of cups, circles, &c. upon stones and rocks in Scotland, England and other countries

Sir J. Y. Simpson, Bart., M.D., D.C.L. - 1867

Download the complete book in pdf format
Chance Posted by Chance
18th July 2010ce

National Library of Scotland


Many old maps of Scotland, all searchable and zoom-inable, including 25 inch to the mile OS maps from 1855-1882. Luvly.

(As kindly tipped off by Branwen).
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
11th February 2010ce
Edited 13th February 2010ce

Above Scotland gallery


loads of photos taken from the new RCAHMS book of aerial photos, plenty to drool over
wideford Posted by wideford
2nd January 2010ce

Historic Scotland


Another good site for researching Scottish sites
ginger tt Posted by ginger tt
16th September 2009ce

Canmore


Great site for getting information on prehistoric monuments in Scotland.
ginger tt Posted by ginger tt
16th September 2009ce
Edited 16th September 2009ce

Latest posts for Scotland

Showing 1-10 of 37,847 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

The Dwarfie Stane (Chambered Tomb) — Fieldnotes

Jump off the Moanes ferry, Folllow the obvious road..Take the first road left. Follow it. Signs will lead you there. It's by an obvious parking spot just after the second Dwarfie stone sign.
Theres a bothy about 4 miles away..if you get drunk and miss the ferry. :D
harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
20th May 2019ce

The Fairy Knowe (Chambered Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Taking the bus either way you want to get off at Finstown. Facing kirkwall just walk along the road to the first obvious right turn. Think its signed "Old Finstown rd". You cant miss it.
Two routes. Turn right into the community hall road and just keep heading uphill. About half a mile up you'll see an obvious left onto the moor. Follow it for 5 mins and you'll see the modern cairns. Shes below you on your left. :)
Second route takes a short walk along the road. It is short but I wouldn't do it with kids. The sign points you to it and this route involves a much shorter uphill walk.
You flip the coin!
harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
20th May 2019ce

The Dwarfie Stane (Chambered Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by harestonesdown<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by harestonesdown<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by harestonesdown harestonesdown Posted by harestonesdown
19th May 2019ce

Culbo (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

After a long and fairly annoying look around the 'improved field' at Brae Farm we headed south west back along the minor road until the Culbo junction. Follow the road until the second major corner and take the farm track south.

Canmore has the cairn situated amongst trees, however these trees are long gone and a new fir tree plantation was being planted when I arrived which meant that I could clearly see the cairn, slightly uphill, to the south.

An easy walk of about 400 meters leads to the cairn. It has been clipped by a track to the east and has had field clearance bunged on northern side. On the eastern side a couple of kerbs remain in place. Some type of plant grows on the southern side as well, whatever it is it makes the cairn look in need of a hair cut. On top of the cairn the earthfast stones are still there and at various points cairn material is clearly visible. To the east there is a chamber cairn, to the west and north glorious views of Wyvis and the Cromarty Firth.

A fine cairn to end a fine days hiking in the Black Isle, despite the untidiness of Brae Farm. Better get there in the near future or once again the cairn will be hidden by trees.

Visited 10/4/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
16th May 2019ce

Brae Farm (Kerbed Cairn) — Fieldnotes

This much damaged cairn is in a corner of a disaster area to the north of the barns at Brae Farm. The kerb in the north arc is fairly well still preserved whilst others lay strewn everywhere around. Yet it still survives at just over 7m wide and at its tallest is 1m, the collapse in the cairn appears to have been filled in. There is a lot of rubble lying about thanks to the 'improvements'.

Brae Farm Chamber Cairn NH 6615 6281

As for the chamber cairn supposedly nearby, stones were lying everywhere, gorse/whins piled up. Will go back to have a look, but hugely annoying.

Visited 10/4/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th May 2019ce

Brae Farm (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

After returning to the forestry car park near Breachloch, we about turned and headed back north, then take the first minor road heading north east, keep going along till the road ends (very straight, very twisty, very straight) meeting another minor road. Take this road which heads south east then north east. If you look to the south the cairn can be spotted before the road to Brae Farm. At the farm I asked permission to park which was kindly given.

At the farm head west into the field avoiding the barns, basically horse shoe round these buildings and after a couple of fence jumps the cairn is in front with stunning views north (the town in front is Alness), west and east.

The cairn, at one time completely separate, appears to have been joined by field clearance on its eastern side. I noticed that cattle feeders had also been used on top of the site. Still kerbs remain in place to the south and the width, 9m, can still be detected. It is almost 1m in height.

This site has seen much better days, hopefully it can be rescued.

Visited 10/4/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th May 2019ce

Breachloch Hill (Cairn(s)) — Fieldnotes

On leaving the dun at Findon Cottage we headed back west on the B9169 towards Culbokie taking the first minor road south east. Keep going until the road becomes very straight, half way down this there is car parking for forestry walks on the west side.

We walked back up the road until a track heading east, near a mast, which gradually turns into a walkers track.

The forestry people discovered the cairn and have completely made sure that it will be almost impossible to find. It has been trashed and trees planted on top. Only the height (1m) of the site gives an indication of its whereabouts, deep trenches either side make it dangerous for walking. Its width is approx 10m.

Sadly not much to see, a nice walk tho except for the approach to the site.

Visited 10/4/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th May 2019ce

Findon Cottage (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

After a lengthy stay at Carn Mor we headed back into Culbokie to head further east along the B9169 until the first minor road heading north, keep on the road as it swings to the east. Plenty room to park at Milton Cottage.

Head west across the road, down a fairly steep gully, jump the Findon Burn, climb up the other side and the remains of the dun will be straight in front.

The dun has been badly quarried but enough remains to give a fairly good idea of what might have been. In parts the surrounding wall/rampart still survives at 1m high and is 3.5m wide.

Nice site despite being almost an extension of a garden and despite my best efforts I didn't fall into the burn.

Visited 10/4/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
15th May 2019ce
Showing 1-10 of 37,847 posts. Most recent first | Next 10