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D45 Emmen (Emmerdennen)


<b>D45 Emmen (Emmerdennen)</b>Posted by JaneImage © Jane Tomlinson
Latitude:52° 47' 29.76" N
Longitude:   6° 54' 28.7" E

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D45 dammaged by fire

Some friends from the Netherlands visited this week and told me about a fire that has damaged D45 Emmen. Vandalism seems to be the cause, repair to the damaged stone is planned for later this year but very sad to see this sort of damage. Here are some links reporting the news...
texlahoma Posted by texlahoma
12th August 2011ce

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<b>D45 Emmen (Emmerdennen)</b>Posted by LesHamilton <b>D45 Emmen (Emmerdennen)</b>Posted by LesHamilton <b>D45 Emmen (Emmerdennen)</b>Posted by LesHamilton <b>D45 Emmen (Emmerdennen)</b>Posted by sam <b>D45 Emmen (Emmerdennen)</b>Posted by sam <b>D45 Emmen (Emmerdennen)</b>Posted by Jane


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Visited 2011, 2012 and 2013.

Following the damage to Hunebed D45 Emmerdennen, the pieces of the shattered stone were removed to Tienhoven, in the province of Zuid-Holland and joined together again. First, the two halves were glued together using epoxy resin. Once this had set, four holes, each three metres in length, were drilled through the stone and stainless steel rods 3 centimetres in diameter inserted and glued in place. Finally, the drill holes were camouflaged so that they are now scarcely noticeable. The cost of restoration was €20,000. The restored capstone was replaced on its sidestones in early December 2011.

The work has been carried out to a very high standard. The join is almost invisible: indeed, unless you actually look for it, it is unlikely that you would notice it at all.

A report on this (in Dutch) can be found here, which includes a number of photographs, one of them showing the holes drilled into the stone.
An original news report on the incident (dated July 11, 2011) can be found here, and a photograph of the damage can be seen here.
The text of the article translates as follows ...
"In a woodland area near Emmen, a hunebed has been badly damaged. According to the State Forest Management, vandals had lit a fire under one of the capstones. As a consequence, the stone, measuring 3 by 4 metres split in half and fell into the grave.

"A walker discovered the destruction to the prehistoric monument this morning. Forester Geerling Kruidhof said that the vandals had been irresponsible. A serious accident could have occurred as children regularly play among the stones.

"State Forest Management have closed off the dolmen, a National Monument, for security. Damage is valued at 15,000 euro. It is not yet known if the hunebed will be restored."

The Netherlands has 54 hunebeds, of which 52 lie in Drenthe.

There is a YouTube video showing the repaired stone being replaced here .
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
24th May 2013ce
Edited 5th March 2016ce

Drive back into Emmen and out the other side past the railway station on the Boslaan into yet another forested area , the Emmer Dennen, and you will find D45, the great Emmen hunebed just a 10 minute walk from the city centre. I had seen a photo of it on Hans Meijer's wonderful site, but it didn't prepare me for the mammoth, in-yer-face gorgeousness of it!

Again surrounded by mature mixed woodland, this impressed me more than the biggest hunebed of them all that we had first seen at Borger, in fact I find it hard to believe that the one at Borger is bigger. The lime irredescent flash of a woodpecker as it swooped through the branches lead our way towards it. On a high raised area of what remains of the barrow, six whopping capstones are held aloft by at least 17 uprights. It has endstones, a porch and I counted 13 kerbstones which once would've marked the edge of the barrow's gigantic footprint. Apparently there once were 38 kerbstones, but who cares? The 13 that remain are sufficient evidence of a very tall, grand structure indeed.
Jane Posted by Jane
30th July 2007ce


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Hans Meijer's Dolmens in the Netherlands

Jane Posted by Jane
30th July 2007ce