The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Opferstein - Börger (Natural Rock Feature) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Opferstein - Börger</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Opferstein - Börger</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Opferstein - Börger</b>Posted by Nucleus

Matthiesings Opferstein (Natural Rock Feature) — Fieldnotes

taken from the information board:

Matthiesing's altar stone

Altar stone from the early Stone Age (3rd millennium BC). According to legend, the devil wanted to hurl this boulder against the Ueffel church and destroy it.

But the devil's power was broken by the crowing of the cock at the neighboring court of Matthiesing at midnight.

The stone then turned on its own axis.

Matthiesings Opferstein (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Matthiesings Opferstein</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Matthiesings Opferstein</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Matthiesings Opferstein</b>Posted by Nucleus

Karlsteine — Images

<b>Karlsteine</b>Posted by Nucleus

Karlsteine — Fieldnotes

taken from the "Route of Megalithic Culture" information board:

Traveling Stones

During the Saalian (Wolstonian) Stage of the Ice Age about 20,000 years ago glaciers transported granite stones from Scandonavia to Northern Germany, which at the time was covered by approx. 400 metres of ice. Climatic warming caused the ice to melt, thus providing the Neolithic people in North-West Germany with their impressive construction material.

Only the Karlsteine do not fit into the pciture: The carbon-quartzite used originates from the neighbouring Piesberg. According to the legend Charlemagne split the capstone in half with his whip which is even more astonishing given that carbon-quartize is one of the toughest stone far and wide.

Within walking distance (approx. 500 metres) to the southwest the "Kreuz im Hone" a cross is commemorating the place where the first Christian mass in the Osnabrück region was said 783 AD. Following Charlemagne's ambitions to convert the Saxons to Christianity.

Vehrte 1 (Passage Grave) — Fieldnotes

taken from the information board:

Devil's oven
Neolithic megalithic grave

On the construction of megalithic tombs
Megalithic tombs are among the buildings of the so-called megalithic culture (from Greek mega = large and lithos = stone). Its essential element is the upright stone (= menhir). Such constructions exist as rows of stones, stone circles, temples and tombs. The best known example is Stonehenge in England.

The North German megalithic sites are almost exclusively grave sites from the Neolithic period, built between 3,500 and 2,800 BC. The core of a site is the ground-level chamber. It consists of individual yokes placed side by side in east-west direction (one yoke = two wall stones and one capstone) and the closing stones on the narrow sides. The floor of the burial chamber was paved with small boulder fragments and stone scree. The large joints between the wall and ceiling stones are filled with dry masonry wall.

The name passage grave, as a name for the type of grave that is common in our country, states that originally a short passage formed of boulders ran towards the middle of the southern longitudinal wall.

The entire stone construction was covered by its builders with a mound. The hill foot was partly framed with still visible oval stoneworks to prevent slippage of the accumulated earth masses.

Vehrte 1 (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Vehrte 1</b>Posted by Nucleus

Vehrte 2 (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Vehrte 2</b>Posted by Nucleus

Vehrte 2 (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Fieldnotes

taken from the information board:

Devils dough trough
Neolithic grave site

The builders of the megalithic tombs
In northern Germany, the megalithic tombs belong to the legacy of the so-called funnel beaker culture, named after the typical shape of their pottery. This population began in the Neolithic period from about 3,500 BC. also in our country, to practice agriculture and livestock. With this they finished the oldest and longest period of human history, the time of hunter-gatherer cultures, and introduced the sedentary way of life.

From the study of flower pollen we know today that it was 2-3°C warmer then today. There were large oak mixed forests on whose clear edges, near the stream or river, with stone axes the forest was cleared and fields and settlements were created. The most important crop was cereals, whereby only those species were cultivated, which came in the course of 5,000 years with the spreading of the rural way of life from Near East to Central and Northern Europe. These included the wheat varieties einkorn and wild emmer as well as barley.

The livestock can be retraced from individual bone finds. In the 4th millennium BC after that, cattle and pigs and, also imported from Southeastern Europe, sheep and goats were bred.

Haltern (Passage Grave) — Fieldnotes

taken from the information board:

Megalithic tomb Slopsteine
Neolithic grave site
(3500 - 2800 BC)

The foothills of the Wiehengebirges north of Bissendorf are well into the 18./19. Century a center of graves from the Neolithic and Bronze Age. The map shows this picture also for today's time, however the inventory has decreased by a multiple. The exact number of originally existing sites is no longer detectable today.

The megalithic tombs belong to the Neolithic megalithic culture (Greek: "mega" = large, "lithos" = the stone) and are among the oldest and most impressive proof of human life and work in northern Germany. They date from the 3rd to the 4th millennium BC and still inspire the imagination of the viewer today. The researchers associate them with the Neolithic revolution when the sedentary lifestyle began with the beginnings of agriculture and livestock. Concrete references to the people who built and used these monuments are sparse.

Haltern (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Haltern</b>Posted by Nucleus

Grambergen 1 (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Fieldnotes

taken from the information board:

Megalithic tomb Deitinghausen
Neolithic grave site
(3500 - 2800 BC)

The foothills of the Wiehengebirges north of Bissendorf are well into the 18./19. Century a center of graves from the Neolithic and Bronze Age. The map shows this picture also for today's time, however the inventory has decreased by a multiple. The exact number of originally existing sites is no longer detectable today.

The megalithic tombs belong to the Neolithic megalithic culture (Greek: "mega" = large, "lithos" = the stone) and are among the oldest and most impressive proof of human life and work in northern Germany. They date from the 3rd to the 4th millennium BC and still inspire the imagination of the viewer today. The researchers associate them with the Neolithic revolution when the sedentary lifestyle began with the beginnings of agriculture and livestock. Concrete references to the people who built and used these monuments are sparse.

Grambergen 1 (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Images

<b>Grambergen 1</b>Posted by Nucleus

Teufelssteine - Lüstringen (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 1: Devils Stones (1a)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Gretesch 1 (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 1: Gretesch Stones (1b)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Jeggen (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 2: Megalithic Tomb Jeggen


http://www.strassedermegalithkultur.de/en/site-2-megalithic-tomb-jeggen

Schwagstorf 1 (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 3: Driehauser Stones (3a)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Darpvenner Steine — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 3: Darpvenner Stones (3b-d)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Vehrte 2 (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 4: Devils Baking Trough and Devils Oven (4b+c)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Vehrte 1 (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 4: Devils Baking Trough and Devils Oven (4b+c)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Süntelstein (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Folklore

The Legend of the Süntelstein according to J. Sudendorf (1853):

When the first church was built in Venne the devil still lived in Vehrte Bruch on the other side of the hills, where “Devils Baking trough” and “Devils Oven” are still to be seen. He disliked very much the sacred work of church building. In order to block the door to the church he got a big granite boulder around midnight, wrapped a thick chain crosswise around it and carried it on his back uphill. But the stone was so heavy that despite his enormous strength he started feeling the heat like hellfire. Sometimes he just stopped to catch his breath.

Time passed by and dawn approached. And just when the devil reached the top of the hill the first rays of the rising sun shot towards him from the east and a wakeful cock crowed from Venne valley its morning greetings. This put an end to the devil’s nightly deed. Furiously he took the boulder at the top end and slammed it with all his might into the hard soil of the hill.

Since then the devil has left the area. The stone is still in the same position where it had been rammed into the ground. The hard crash has left its traces though; where the chain surrounded the stone in the middle and from top to bottom cracks appeared and chain marks are noticeable at the outer rim s of the cracks. And the devils body imprinted visibly on the Venne facing side of the stone, because his infernal body heat melted the granite where he had touched the boulder.

Every morning ever since with the first rays of the rising sun the stone turns three times on its own axis. To commemorate the saving of the church in Venne by the sun which destroyed the devil’s nightly deeds the stone is named "Süntelstein".

Süntelstein (Standing Stone / Menhir) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 4: Süntelstein (4a)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Helmichsteine (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 5: Helmich Stones (5)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Oestringer Steine — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 6: Oestringen Stones (6a+b)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Karlsteine — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 7: Karlsteine (Stones of Charlemagne) (7a+b)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Ueffeln (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 8: Megalithic Tomb at the Wiemelsberg (8)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Giersfeld — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 9: Steingräberweg (Megalithic Tomb Trail) Giersfeld (9a-i)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Restrup (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 10: Megalithic tomb Restrup and Teufelsstein (Devils Stone) (10b)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Restruper Näpfchenstein (Cup Marked Stone) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 10: Megalithic tomb Restrup and Teufelsstein (Devils Stone) (10b)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Hekeser Steine — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 10: Megalithic Tombs Hekese (10a)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Freren 1 (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 11: Megalithic Tomb in the Altfreren Woods


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Langen (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 12: Megalithic Tomb on the Radberg (12b)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Thuine (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 12: Megalithic Tomb at Kunkenvenne (12a)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Apeldorn (Chambered Tomb) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 13: Stone Key (13)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Groß-Stavern 1 (Chambered Tomb) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 14: Megalithic Grave at Bruneforths Esch (14f)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Klein-Stavern 1 — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 14: Megalithic Grave at the Osteresch (14e)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Deymanns Mühle — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 14: Megalithic Graves at Deymann’s Mill (14a-d)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Sögel 1 — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 15: Megalithic Tomb Püttkesberge (15c)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Sögel 3 (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 15: Megalithic Tombs at Düvelskuhlen (15a-b)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Sögel 2 (Passage Grave) — Links

Route of Megalithic Culture - Site 15: Megalithic Tombs at Düvelskuhlen (15a-b)


330 kilometres of scenic route lead you to 33 exciting archaeological sites through Northwest Germany. On your way you will find more than 70 Neolithic (3.500 to 2.800 B.C.) megalithic tombs.

Düwelsteene - Heiden (Passage Grave) — Fieldnotes

The Düwelsteene (Devil Stones in Low German) are the most south-westerly, in the core area preserved megalithic site of funnel beaker culture, created about 3500-2800 BC and one of the few in Westphalia.

They were already restored in 1932. The northeast-southwest oriented site is 12 m long outside (inside 10.2 m) and 2.7 m to 4.3 m wide (inside 1.5 m to 2.2 m); the inside height is 1.5 m. The now-defunct original chamber floor was covered with a patch of flat field and flint stones. Almost all the supporting stones and three capstones are still preserved, whereas an enclosure is no longer visible today. Access to the chamber is no longer safe to determine.

The megalith tomb can be reached via the Reken exit of the autobahn A31. Here you drive towards Heiden until you reach a roundabout. Turn right (north) until the next roundabout, here first straight ahead over the roundabout and after 290m right into the Düwelsteenweg. Follow this for 1.6 km until you come to an junction. Here you should park and walk the remaining 600m on a sandy, unpaved road on foot.

Visited July 2018

Düwelsteene - Heiden (Passage Grave) — Folklore

Today, the name of the Düwelsteene is linked above all to the legend of a cunning cobbler, to whom a monument on the market place of Heiden is dedicated. According to this, the devil carried a sack full of heavy stones on his back and was on his way to Aachen to destroy the cathedral of Charlemagne. Near Heiden he met a cobbler carrying twelve pairs of worn-out shoes. Asked by the devil, how far was it to Aachen, the cobbler pointed to the shoes: It was far away that he had torn all these shoes on his way from Aachen to Heiden. He had recognized the devil at once by his horse's foot and had suspected evil, so that he gave this clever answer. His information led the Devil, already worn out by carrying the heavy stones, to pour them out of the sack in the act of rage and then pull them away. These stones were called from then on the Düwelsteene.

taken from Kerstin Schierhold/Bernhard Stapel, Die Düwelsteene bei Heiden, Kreis Borken. Megalithgräber in Westfalen 3 (Münster 2018)

Wersen II (Passage Grave) — Images

<b>Wersen II</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Wersen II</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Wersen II</b>Posted by Nucleus<b>Wersen II</b>Posted by Nucleus
Showing 1-50 of 2,560 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
During my first trip to Ireland back in 2006, I was bitten by the 'megalithic' bug and since then I seek for every opportunity to visit as much sites as possible, with a bias for stone circles.

As I live in the southwest of Germany (not an area famous for megaliths), I rely on my holidays to be able to visit these sites.

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