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Giant's Chair

Cairn(s)

<b>Giant's Chair</b>Posted by thesweetcheatImage © A. Brookes (11.8.2010)
Nearest Town:Ludlow (9km WSW)
OS Ref (GB):   SO593779 / Sheets: 137, 138
Latitude:52° 23' 49.76" N
Longitude:   2° 35' 53.61" W

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From "Shropshire - An Archaeological Guide" -Michael Watson (2002 Shropshire Books):

"The hilltop had been a place of meaning to local Bronze Age communities long before the heights were fortified. Two ring cairns on the W hill summit are evdence for this. The first, disturbed and only partially surviving is surmounted by a modern OS trig. pillar. What remains of a central low mound is surrounded by the E arc of a stony ring bank, originally perhaps up to 28m in diameter. 80m to the SE, the other cairn is a low circular flat topped mound of earth, 23m across, with remains of a stone kerb around its edge. The excavation trench of 1932 is still visible and this located a 2.3m deep circular pit beneath the centre of the mound, but no direct evidence for the monument's date. The SW quadrant is truncated."

The Giant's Chair itself is a natural rock feature.
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
18th February 2009ce
Edited 22nd September 2010ce