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News

Neanderthal 'skeleton' is first found in a decade


By Paul Rincon Science editor, BBC News website

Researchers have described the first "articulated" remains of a Neanderthal to be discovered in a decade.

An articulated skeleton is one where the bones are still arranged in their original positions.

The new specimen was uncovered at Shanidar Cave in Iraq and consists of the upper torso and crushed skull of a middle-aged to older adult.

Excavations at Shanidar in the 1950s and 60s unearthed partial remains of 10 Neanderthal men, women and children.

During these earlier excavations, archaeologists found that some of the burials were clustered together, with clumps of pollen surrounding one of the skeletons.

The researcher who led those original investigations, Ralph Solecki from Columbia University in New York, claimed it was evidence that Neanderthals had buried their dead with flowers.

This "flower burial" captured the imagination of the public and kicked off a decades-long controversy. The floral interpretation suggested our evolutionary relatives were capable of cultural sophistication, challenging the view - prevalent at the time - that Neanderthals were unintelligent and animalistic.

More: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-51532781
ryaner Posted by ryaner
18th February 2020ce

London

Mudlarker unearths a Neolithic skull on the banks of the River Thames


Martin Bushell spotted the 5,600-year-old skull fragment digging in the muddy banks of the Thames

A human skull from the Neolithic era has been put on display at the Museum of London.

But the incredibly rare specimen wasn't found in some elaborate archaeological dig. The skull was unearthed by a sharp-eyed mudlarker strolling the banks of the River Thames.

"When I first saw it, I thought it was a pot that might have been upside down — like a ceramic pot," Martin Bushell told As It Happens host Carol Off. "It looked more like a crab shell."

Mudlarkers are amateur archeologists who scour the banks of the Thames at low tide for treasure and historic artifacts. The tradition dates back to the Victorian era.

More: https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-it-happens-thursday-edition-1.5028070/british-mudlarker-unearths-a-neolithic-skull-on-the-banks-of-the-river-thames-1.5028073
ryaner Posted by ryaner
4th February 2020ce

Jersey

Jersey ‘drowned landscape’ could yield Ice Age insights


Archaeologists are planning an ambitious survey of part of the seabed off Jersey where Neanderthals once lived.

The site is part-exposed during spring low tide, giving the team a four-hour window to dig while the sea is out.

Stone tools and mammoth remains have been recovered from the Violet Bank over the years.

More: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-51299755
ryaner Posted by ryaner
30th January 2020ce

Star Carr (Mesolithic site)

Making a 'Star Carr' Mesolithic type shale pendant - Event in Stockport


"In this second session we will be looking at the Mesolithic period and making a 'Star Carr' type shale pendant. The Mesolithic is the period when people repopulated Britain after the last major Ice Age event. "

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/making-a-mesolithic-star-carr-type-pendant-tickets-80688061163
amd Posted by amd
28th January 2020ce

Mulfra Quoit (Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech)

Mulfra Quoit vandalised with painting of aliens


https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/gallery/anger-aliens-appear-ancient-site-3717447.amp
thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
10th January 2020ce

Wentwood Barrows (Round Barrow(s))

'Appalling damage' to Newport ancient burial mound


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-51013596
nix Posted by nix
7th January 2020ce

Airigh Na Beinne Bige (Stone Circle)

Lewis stone circle has star-shaped lightning strike


Evidence of a "massive" lightning strike has been found at the centre of a stone circle in the Western Isles.

A single large strike, or many smaller ones on the same spot, left a star-shaped magnetic anomaly at the 4,000-year-old site in Lewis.

Scientists made the discovery at Site XI or Airigh na Beinne Bige, a hillside stone circle now consisting of a single standing stone.

The site is at the famous Calanais Standing Stones.

Scientists said the lightning strike, which was indentified in a geophysics survey, could show a potential link between the construction of ancient stone circles and the forces of nature.

They said the lightning struck some time before peat enveloped the stone circle at Site XI 3,000 years ago. The discovery is detailed in new research published online.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-50891787
moss Posted by moss
24th December 2019ce

Denmark (Country)

Neolithic chewing gum helps recreate image of ancient Dane


Analysis of birch tar describes a female hunter-gatherer with dark skin and blue eyes

At the dawn of the Neolithic era, a young woman discarded a lump of ancient chewing gum made from birch tar into a shallow, brackish lagoon that drew fishers to the coast of southern Denmark.

Nearly 6,000 years later, researchers excavating the site spotted the gum amid pieces of wood and wild animal bone and from it have reassembled her complete DNA and so painted the broadest strokes of her portrait.

More: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/dec/17/neolithic-dna-ancient-chewing-gum-denmark?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other
ryaner Posted by ryaner
17th December 2019ce

Traprain Law (Hillfort)

Traprain Law Silver 100th Anniversary of its discovery


Had the fantastic pleasure of a brilliant lecture from Dr Fraser Hunter with stunning slides (in amazing resolution) at Lanark on Monday 9th December.

https://blog.nms.ac.uk/2019/05/12/a-century-of-silver-the-traprain-treasure-on-its-hundredth-birthday/

There is a new, rather pricey book coming out. The images are simply stunning and the finds shed new light on the context of Traprain from Bronze Age through to the Iron Age. Maybe one for the Santa wishlist.

https://www.bookdepository.com/Late-Roman-Silver-Treasure-from-Traprain-Law-Fraser-Hunter/9781910682234

Another very recent find (from some lovely Detectorists) over in Fife.

https://blog.nms.ac.uk/2017/08/01/rebuilding-roman-silver-a-fantastic-find-from-fife/
Howburn Digger Posted by Howburn Digger
11th December 2019ce

Eire

Why have thousands of archaeological sites ‘disappeared’?


While the archaeologists have been busy finding new monuments of interest, the State has been busy facilitating their systematic removal

Mon, Dec 9, 2019, 05:00

Mark Clinton

According to the legal definition, there are five alternative criteria under which a monument qualifies as a national monument. Defying alphabetical order, “historical interest” is the first listed criterion. In 2003 the Carrickmines Castle site was recognised as a national monument before the Supreme Court. And now we are launching the history of the settlement and fortification, its long-term occupants the Walshes, their cousins in Shanganagh, Kilgobbin, Balally, etc, and, among many other players, that of the besieger of Carrickmines in March 1642, Sir Simon Harcourt. It is a colourful story, with a big finale. Truly, a site worthy of its national monument status.

And yet, the site, the national monument, is no more, save for some sad remnants, scattered about a busy roundabout. Ah yes, the Carrickmines junction. A junction not connecting with any national routes or, indeed, with a road of any significance. A junction whose planning origins remain unknown despite the best efforts of the Flood-Mahon tribunal. One of a daisy-chain of junctions along a motorway originally designed to carry national traffic unimpeded around Dublin city. A junction that effectively destroyed the integrity of the national monument. How did this happen?

The National Monuments Act, passed in 1930, brought legal protection to our ancient built heritage. On a number of subsequent occasions the Act was amended and strengthened to remove weaknesses and loopholes. Particular credit should go to former ministers Michael D Higgins and Síle de Valera for their significant contributions to the protective legislation.

More: https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/why-have-thousands-of-archaeological-sites-disappeared-1.4103381?fbclid=IwAR3zs9yezDZ02D85XGVIGsLazia-AuDR9RKcSbQfQoqKtXJInbP2dMVHCTo
ryaner Posted by ryaner
11th December 2019ce
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