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Orkney

Plan revealed for a ‘Neolithic Landscapes of the Dead’ chambered tomb trail on Orkney


A £60,000 research project is to be undertaken to create a ‘Neolithic Landscapes of the Dead’ chambered tomb trail in Orkney.

More info :

https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp/news/islands/1848067/plan-revealed-for-a-neolithic-landscapes-of-the-dead-chambered-tomb-trail-in-orkney/
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
25th September 2019ce

Spain (Country)

Drought Uncovers ‘Spanish Stonehenge’ Hidden Underwater For Decades


In 1963, the Spanish government under Francisco Franco built the Valdecañas Reservoir, which brought water and electricity to underdeveloped parts of western Spain. However, the creation of the reservoir flooded some inhabited areas as well as large stone (megalithic) monuments. After 50 years of being submerged, one of these ancient monuments—the Dolmen of Guadalperal—has resurfaced due to dry, hot conditions in 2019.

More information at https://allthatsinteresting.com/dolmen-de-guadalperal.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
19th September 2019ce

France (Country)

Neanderthal footprints found in France offer snapshot of their lives


Scientists find 257 prints that were preserved in wind-driven sand 80,000 years ago

Scientists have found hundreds of perfectly preserved footprints, providing evidence that Neanderthals walked the Normandy coast in France.
The prints suggest a group of 10-13 individuals, mostly children and adolescents, were on the shoreline 80,000 years ago.
Neanderthals, the closest evolutionary cousins to present-day humans and primates, have long been thought to have lived in social groups, but details have been hard to establish.

More: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/sep/10/neanderthal-footprints-found-in-france-offer-snapshot-of-their-lives?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other
ryaner Posted by ryaner
11th September 2019ce

Dun Olavat (Stone Fort / Dun)

Artificial islands in Scotland date back to 3700BC, scientists discover


Mysterious man-made islets found in lochs on Scotland’s remote Outer Hebridean islands may be thousands of years older than previously realised, a study has revealed.

More info :

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/scotland-islands-crannogs-neolithic-history-pots-outer-hebrides-a8956006.html
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
10th September 2019ce

Highland (Mainland)

Stone Age hunter-gather camp found at Berriedale Braes


Work to improve a notorious hairpin bend on the A9 in the Highlands has revealed the site of a hunter-gatherers' camp.

More info :

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-49495139
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
30th August 2019ce

Mither Tap (Hillfort)

Pictish occupation of Aberdeenshire hill fort confirmed


Pictish occupation of a fort on a well-known hill in Aberdeenshire has been confirmed by archaeologists.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-49434133
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
24th August 2019ce

Highland (Mainland)

1,200-year-old Pictish cross-slab discovered near Dingwall


A stone carved by Picts 1,200 years ago has been discovered in the Highlands.

Archaeologists said the find is of national importance because it is one of only about 50 complete Pictish cross-slabs known to exist.

Decorated with a number of symbols, the stone was uncovered at an early Christian church site near Dingwall.

It was used as a grave marker in the 1790s and discovered hidden in vegetation by Anne MacInnes of North of Scotland Archaeological Society.

Read more about this find on the BBC website and in the Ross-shire Journal.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
24th August 2019ce

Dinas Dinlle (Cliff Fort)

Dinas Dinlle dig uncovers Iron Age roundhouse and Roman coins


A huge Iron Age roundhouse, thought to be about 2,500 years old, and roman pottery have been uncovered during an archaeological dig at a coastal fort.

Volunteers have joined experts to find out more about the little-known Dinas Dinlle National Trust-owned monument in Gwynedd before it falls into the sea.

The 43ft (13m) wide roundhouse was buried by coastal sand, thought to have blown there during a sandstorm in 1330.

Coins found at the fort near Caernarfon suggest it was occupied in Roman times.

The "well-preserved" roundhouse - with its 8ft (2.5m) thick walls - was uncovered close to the cliff edge buried underneath 3ft (1m) of sand during a two-week dig.

More: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-49397328?ns_mchannel=social&ns_campaign=bbc_wales_news&ns_linkname=wales&ns_source=facebook&fbclid=IwAR0nyySxlVuqawKkRL7-6vl6GmiF38rLZlWAO78mVxWtmVuS46jdmbJoHvw
ryaner Posted by ryaner
21st August 2019ce

Boyne Valley Complex

Unknown monuments identified close to Newgrange in 'exceptionally successful' survey


Around 40 previously unknown monuments have been identified in the Brú na Bóinne area close to Newgrange as a result of what a leading archaeologist says was an “exceptionally successful” survey.

Dr Steve Davis of the UCD School of Archaeology, who has worked for over a decade on the Brú na Bóinne landscape, said the monuments appear to range from what are most likely early Neolithic houses to Neolithic timber enclosures as well as Bronze Age burial monuments and some early medieval farmsteads.

The area surveyed included locations both sides of the Boyne, within the bend of the Boyne and across from the megalithic tombs at Newgrange, Knowth and Dowth.

More: https://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/ireland/unknown-monuments-identified-close-to-newgrange-in-exceptionally-successful-survey-942120.html?fbclid=IwAR3TTUaKStOYMnnS8USVbwIZA1p8fw6OA-92zViLJ9r2LoiqAsMhk2NpDdk
ryaner Posted by ryaner
7th August 2019ce

Old Oswestry (Hillfort)

Television historian speak out for Oswestry hillfort


Historian and television presenter, Professor Michael Wood, has expressed serious concern over plans to build houses within the historic landscape of Old Oswestry hillfort.

....................................

In a letter of objection he wrote: "I have followed with concern the proposed developments. The Iron Age hillfort of Old Oswestry is generally agreed to be the finest site of its kind in the Welsh Borders. Any development that threatens its setting, as this self-evidently does, in my view, therefore, should be refused.”

The popular historian said Oswestry’s northern gateway around the hillfort was an extraordinarily interesting - and rare - example of a medieval sacred landscape, which still awaited detailed research and survey. This, he said was is in addition to the area’s multi-phase heritage interest ranging from pre-Iron Age to WW1 military archaeology.

https://www.shropshirestar.com/news/local-hubs/oswestry/2019/07/30/television-historian-speak-out-for-oswestry-hillfort/
moss Posted by moss
30th July 2019ce
Showing 1-10 of 2,541 news posts. Most recent first | Next 10