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Chun Castle

Hillfort

<b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheatImage © A. Brookes (19.10.2015)
Nearest Town:Penzance (7km ESE)
OS Ref (GB):   SW405340 / Sheet: 203
Latitude:50° 8' 54.68" N
Longitude:   5° 37' 58.43" W

Added by Moth


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Photographs:<b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by thesweetcheat <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by formicaant <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by formicaant <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by formicaant <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by formicaant <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by formicaant <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by doug <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by Cursuswalker <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by Cursuswalker <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by David Milner <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by David Milner <b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by Moth Maps / Plans / Diagrams:<b>Chun Castle</b>Posted by Rhiannon

Fieldnotes

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This time we're heading up to the nearby Chun Castle hillfort, which actually we rarely visit on our trips. Its circular walls are satisfyingly chunky and provide a wonderful 360-degree panorama, including the engine house at Ding Dong mine, which is such a ubiquitous landmark from much of the peninsula. But we don't hang around here for long, as our main reason for heading this way is another site we haven't visited previously. thesweetcheat Posted by thesweetcheat
26th August 2010ce
Edited 26th August 2010ce

Visited 11.4.10.
Follow signs for Great Bosullow / Chun Castle - off the Laynon Quoit road. This is a narrow lane which leads you to Trehyllys farm. There is a small sign post near the farm directing you to the Castle and Quoit. Park near to the farm and it is a 20 minute hike up the hill through the dreaded gorse and brambles. There is a 'path' that can be followed where other people have walked up. The site itself is well preserved - the outer wall is clearly seen and in some places still stands about 6ft tall. Once into the Castle the cup marked stone is on the left and the well is directly in front of you on the far side of the hillfort. If you walk across the site to the far side you will see the two standing stones which form the 'gateway' (it feels very cool to walk through!) and beyond that the Quoit is clearly seen 5 minutes walk away. This site is definitely worth visiting!
Posted by CARL
19th April 2010ce

I went here and the nearby quoit in September 2006, I've only just found the pictures again. You can probably see more of it in winter, when it's not so overgrown. It's difficult to know how much stone has been pinched over the years, but the basic outline is still there to see. It's a very exposed site, when I was here, there was a low mist and drizzle, but still very atmospheric. formicaant Posted by formicaant
17th May 2007ce

Folklore

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In the neighbourhood of the castle may be traced the obscure remains of several specimens of the edifices generally termed British huts. The country folks call them "the huts of the old people," - a traditional name agreeing with the results of recent investigation. Upon excavating one of them, there were found a small quantity of charred wood, a great number of burnt stones, and as many fragments of pottery as filled a small bason.
From Rambles in Western Cornwall by the Footsteps of the Giants by J O Halliwell-Phillipps (1861).
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
6th August 2013ce