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Dun Fhearchair (Stone Fort / Dun)

Further along the B891 is another dun, this one in the loch bearing the same name.

I walked along the B891 until the first track heading south, still the rain wouldn't relent.

Walk past the house into some kind of scrapyard, go through this on to the shores of Lochan Dun Fhearchair. The dun is only 10m wide and all that remains is a small pile of stones.

Another once upon a time site, by now the rain was getting very heavy so a look at Balivanich and the purchase of yet more so called water proofs.

Visited 22/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
24th August 2019ce

Gunisary Bay (Stone Fort / Dun)

The next day arrives and a good look round some of Benbecula planned, sadly more hammering down rain. However two duns reasonably near land captured my eye on the map.

Towards the south of Benbecula take the B891 heading east and pull in at the first houes, on the south side of the road. The dun is in the bay directly behind the house.

Sadly not much remains of the dun except for a few stones round the edge. The causeway does remain being mainly submerged.

Visited 22/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
24th August 2019ce

Caolas Fhlodaigh (Promontory Fort)

Just a short distance from the thatched cottage is the promontory fort situated in the bay just slightly to the north.

Follow the shore line to what looks like a turf covered causeway. On top of the old fort farm buildings have been built but look closely and the remnants of the forts outer wall can be seen surrounding the edge of the site.

Not much to see and a case of what once was.

Visited 21/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
24th August 2019ce

Suidheachadh Sealg (Stone Circle)

We parked near the thatched homestead heading towards Flodda after visiting the circle at Gramisdale.

From here I jumped the gate walked south through and up the boggy field, luckily finding a smaller gate which led to an under used track leading the remaining standing stone. By this time the rain lashing down being pushed on by an Atlantic wind.

Sadly most of the stones are down except for a couple of slabs on their side. Despite the conditions I liked this site, on a sunny day there would be tremendous views.

Time to get back to the bottom of the hill.

Visited 21/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
24th August 2019ce

Frachdale (Chambered Cairn)

Visited 22.08.19

I parked at the Kintra campsite. I had to turn back at the ford to get my wellies and stick for the burn crossing. They came in handy later. Frachdale ruin was easily reached and a rough road ran up the hill to Frachdale Chambered Cairn and Coille A'chnoic Mhoir standing stone, easily spotted a quarter of a mile up on the right. As drewbhoy observed Frachdale Chambered Cairn was less accessible. I went through the gate at the top of the hill and followed my GPS South down a steep ferny slope crossing a boggy valley to the summit of the mound. The cairn itself is vegetation free, unlike its surroundings. I retraced my steps to return, avoiding further adventures.
Posted by markj99
22nd August 2019ce

Clachan Ceann Ile (Standing Stone / Menhir)

Following in the stumbling footsteps of drewbhoy, I spent 20 minutes searching for Princess Yula's Stone only to bump into it as I was leaving, unsuccessful in my quest. It was at this happy point that I realised there were less than 20 yards between the two stones! To prevent future Antequarian's frustration I have devised a GPS free solution:
Take the A846 out of Port Ellen, reaching Ardbeg after Laphroaig and Lagavulin. The road narrows to a single track for a further 2 miles until you reach the scenic Loch a Chnuic bay. There is an uphill hairpin at the end of the bay. 20 yards before the apex of the hill there is space to park snugly beside a black wrought iron gate on the right.
Walk down the hill 10 yards, look right to the smaller stone nestled in the edge of the wood. The low fence is easily negotiated. To find the second stone stress free, stand on the left of the smaller stone facing the trees, walk 10 yards forward at which point you should notice a faint path to your left. Follow this path for 10 yards and you will find the Fairy Dell that hides Princess Yula's final resting place.
Posted by markj99
21st August 2019ce

Skail (Broch)

Visited: June 19, 2019

Situated in a field to the west of the Strathnaver road, and exactly a half kilometre north of the more famous Skail chambered cairn, stands a tall, elongated knoll which supports the remains of Skail broch.

Canmore refers to 'several stones in sufficient numbers to suggest an encircling wall which has been almost completely obliterated' round the periphery, although, perhaps because of the lush vegetation, these were not in evidence.

There is no tumble of masonry downhill, and it seems entirely likely that any stonework from the broch would have been robbed for the construction of the nearby farm and its outbuildings.

A small car-park is conveniently situated just 70 metres south of Skail Farm.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
19th August 2019ce
Edited 20th August 2019ce

Wingst (Chambered Tomb)

The tomb has a roughly west-easterly oriented burial chamber with a width of 1.3 m; the length can not be determined exactly. In situ are still the western end stone, as seen from the west, the first and second support stone of the northern and the first and third support stone of the southern long wall. The western capstone still rests in its original position. The following capstone lies at one end on the northern support stone, the southern end rests on the chamber floor. The eastern end of the burial chamber is not preserved.

The tomb is located west-northwest of Dobrock and northwest of Weissenmoor in the forest of Wingst. In several other places of this forest there used to be other megalithic tombs of unknown numbers. In Dobrock drive on the Krönckeweg to the west. After about 1.3 km you will reach a forest parking lot, park here. Take the main forest path to the north (right) and walk for about 550 m. At the Neue Königstanne (New King's Fir) there is a path leading to the west, take this path and after another 80 m a small trail branches at a sign to the left, which leads directly to the tomb.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
17th August 2019ce

Siccar Point (Natural Rock Feature)

A hugely important place, where the father of modern geology James Hutton realised that the geological features there meant that the earth was way way older than had been thought and that prevalent religious doctrine was incorrect. The feature is known as Hutton's Unconformity, and through its correct analysis the concept of Deep Time came into being. A place to ponder. The Edinburgh Geological Society's website will explain far better than I. The geology near Pettico Wick fort a bit down the coast is similar and equally impressive. Just watch out for the cows and their consort on the way there and back... spencer Posted by spencer
16th August 2019ce
Edited 17th August 2019ce

Boreland (Chambered Cairn)

We visited Knockman Wood yesterday in fine weather, doing a complete tour including the Boreland Cairn. The cairn remains undisturbed and clearly work has been done to keep the bracken growth under control, making the cairn easily approached.
The excellent archaeology conducted at the other end of the reserve a few years ago to properly interpret the 18C settlements is now largely obscured by natural regrowth leaving us with interpretation boards to summarise their story. Work all administered by the excellent Creetown Community Trust.
Posted by tomatoman
14th August 2019ce

Cnoc Na Cairidh (Stone Fort / Dun)

Visited: June 25, 2019

Rising steeply on the east bank of the Bay River, at the point where it debouches into Loch Bay, stand the remains of a small dun. Little in the way of structure remains: boulders just peeping from the turf on the seaward side hint at a possible defensive wall, as does a line of largely buried boulders curving round the eastern flank. Otherwise, this is just a grassy mound, falling steeply to the north and west, but down easy slopes elsewhere.

To access this site, head north from Fairy Bridge on the B886 for almost exactly 3 kilometres where, at NG272544, an unsugnposted, unclassified road leads off to the left towards the tiny community of Bay. Follow this road for about 600 metres to its end, where there is space to park. A gate leads to a path down to the coast. You can either follow the coastline, or head directly over easy grassy terrain towards Cnoc Na Cairidh.
LesHamilton Posted by LesHamilton
12th August 2019ce
Edited 13th August 2019ce

Rubha Bhidein (Stone Circle)

Coming from the north take the first minor road heading east from the A865 as you arrive in Gramisdale, Benbecula. I went to the end of the road and was given permission to park.

On a sunny this is a beautiful place, on a dreich Scottish day it felt eerie almost ghost like. What is left of the circle is set in a boggy field, the most visible remnant being the solitary standing stone, several stones are fallen, some are broken and a couple look like they have dumped there. I counted 6 which I thought might be part of the original circle, the rest seemed iffy to me.

Still well worth a visit, the sole standing stone likes company :-)

Visited 21/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
12th August 2019ce

Lamstedt (Passage Grave)

Lamstedt is a very well-preserved passage grave with a trapezoidal layout consisting of 8 support stones and one endstone on the broad end side (the other is missing). On the support stones are still three huge capstones, the fourth lies broken in the southeastern chamber area. Clearly recognizable is an inward inclination of the supporting stones of the approximately four-meter-long chamber. A gap in the middle of the southwestern long side marks the entrance.

The passage grave is located in a clearing in the forest of Westerberg north of Lamstedt. You drive on the K21 from Lamstedt in the direction of Wingst. Approximately 500 m after passing the Steingarten Westerberg, a sign shows the way to the right in the forest and you can park your car. Follow the forest path straight on and after about 150 m you will pass a nice burial mound on the right, before turning right onto the forest path after approx. 450 m (from the road). After another 60 meters the tomb is on the right side in a small clearing.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
11th August 2019ce

Dun Ban (Grimsay) (Stone Fort / Dun)

A squelchy walk of about a 1/2 mile along the cliff top from Dun Hornary leads to the better known Dun Ban.

Although it is overgrown the walls are clearly visible and still stand at around 2m in height. It is described as a galleried dun or Broch. Fortunately the causeway can be seen clearly in some pics on the Canmore page. With the weather beginning to close in my pics show dark water but show the beginnings of the causeway. I'd the walking boots on as the wellingtons were still recovering from their exploits in Skye or I would have been tempted to walk across. Apparently it is shallow on the south and deep to the north, so maybe next time.

An impressive site, impressive loch.

Visited 21/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
11th August 2019ce

Loch Hornary (Grimsay) (Stone Fort / Dun)

With the weather on the turn we headed south on the A865 until the signpost indicating Grimsay/Griomasaigh (Norse - Grim's Island), one of the islands connected by the causeways. Turn east along the minor road until the first signs of rock blasting on the north side. There is a place to park on the south side of the road, the beginnings of an old track.

I headed back north west on the edge of the cliff overlooking Loch Hornary, on a sunny day this a beautiful place (as we saw a few days later) but on this day it was very cloudy but still not raining. The main causeway is on the north side of the island and it looks like the beginnings of another heading to the south. Complex causeways are not unusual on these islands. The four stones set on edge mentioned by Beveridge can be seen in the second of photos towards the left side (west).

Beautiful place on a sunny day, beautiful place on a stormy day.

Visited 21/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
9th August 2019ce

Sloc Sabhaidh Wheelhouse (Ancient Village / Settlement / Misc. Earthwork)

After a good look at Carnan Nan Long, we went back along the minor road taking the road west when it arrived. The track to Baleshare beach is signposted, plenty room to park. This is a popular place for campers and surfers but not on this day. They must have known the weather was on the turn with the temperature beginning to drop and the wind beginning to pick up.

We walked south down the beach heading towards a green mound. Sadly there isn't much to see as the excavations appear to have been back filled. Still worth the effort for the views.

A look at the Baleshare Community Excavations, in the links, shows the huge amount of work that goes has gone here. Fantastic information, diagrams and photos included.

Visited 21/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
8th August 2019ce

Carnan Nan Long (Chambered Cairn)

From Carnan Bhuide we headed back to the causeway and crossed into Baleshare. Follow the road until it ends, do not take the road that heads west.

Carnan Nan Long is a short walk east from the road end, there is a gate at the turning point. It must have been huge at some point as there is a massive footprint but it looks like a lot of stones have been carted way. (you pass a small ferm toun on the way to the site which might explain some it) It still sits at 26m by 20m wide and is almost 4m tall. A stone remains standing on the south side whilst on the north west side two large slabs are resting. Some erosion has happened to the north east.

Cracking position for a cairn, cracking site.

Visited 21/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
8th August 2019ce

Carnan Buidhe (Cairn(s))

Just before the causeway to Baleshare, which means east village, take the minor road heading north and follow the sign to the sculpture, a bench like structure

Reflections sculpture is located at Claddach, Baleshare and marks the old crossing place to Baleshare before the causeway was built. The sculpture is by artist Colin Mackenzie and is a ceramic seat and is shaped reminiscent to the patterns in left in the sand at low tide.

The cairn can be seen from its modern counterpart by looking south to the wee peninsula, simply follow the coastline on a sometimes eroded path. The main approach is from the east and this gives the false impression that this an undisturbed turf covered monument. Undisturbed by human hands perhaps, natures most definitely. Sadly a lot of erosion has happened but at least that gives an indication of how the structure was built. A lot of cairn material lays strewn on the north side.

What is left is probably around 18m wide and 3m tall. Still impressive, despite the battering it takes. Carnan Buidhe means 'little yellow cairn'.

A good start to the road end collection.

Visited 21/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
8th August 2019ce

Carinish (Stone Circle)

Beveridge found 19 stones, 5 up 14 down with one deliberately broken in two, he wasn't to know that the island's main road the A865 was to be built straight through the middle of it. Now 4 possibly stand on the east with 1 remaining on the west, with fallen stones inbetween.

A case of 'what if' but we didn't blink as we walked from our base at Burnside between the villages of Clachan and Carinish, a very pleasant walk in which we played spot the stone circle. After the Free Church building look for the highest point to the south east, a heathery brown mound. Probably the reason the circle was built.

The walk ensured that quite a few of Skye's beers would find a new home.

Visited 20/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
8th August 2019ce

Cringravel (Cairn(s))

Cringraval is described by Erskine Beveridge as a chamber cairn and I wouldn't disagree. The entrance is in the east between two standing slabs with the chamber slabs still standing though maybe not in their original place. What remains of the houked cairn sits at 10 x 9m wide and almost 1m tall. Add a few years and the Iron Age folks might have used the cairn as an enclosure or roundhouse. Magnificent all round views on a sunny day from the highest point in the area.

We parked at the entrance to the turbine offices, opposite the start of the B894 and headed west up the wee hill. Not really steep but full of wee holes.

Visited 20/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
8th August 2019ce

Dun Beag Cairn (Cairn(s))

From Boraig, on the A855 and head west. Now we got very lucky as the gate beneath Dun Beag was open so I simply drove carefully in a short distance, well clear of the road. This is the track that Les describes which goes round the hill and up to the dun. Next time for the dun.

The Balmeanach cairn still stands at over 14m wide and 1m tall, a bit of cairn robbing has flattened the top. There is the remains of a more up to date wall but there might also be kerbs on the west side, at least 2 stones are earthfast.

A great position for a great site with great views of Staffin Bay.


Traffic
Now on the day we visited it was clearly the day for idiot drivers as we were twice practically shoved from the road as people rushed to the top. At the top it seemed if everybody with a car was here, some of Scotland's most legendary walks/climbs are in the vicinity. Fortunately there is a car park in the middle of being built (with signs about thieving), it will need to big when finished, however with all the traffic the road is beginning to fall apart. To get through to the other side is nervous drive through cars and a hamburger van crammed in at both sides. Once through it's a clear run to rejoin the A855 above Uig. Just time for another idiot, as we we were slowing down at the 'give way sign' to rejoin the A87 we were overtaken at the junction by someone speeding towards the ferry. Unbelievable or words probably stronger!

Visited 20/7/2019.

Public road announcement over.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
7th August 2019ce

Cadha Riach (Chambered Cairn)

We found this site to be almost 'cute' amongst beautiful scenery. The Quiraing, which I've climbed a few times before will not attempted today as there is a ferry to catch, dominates with the island of Staffin and the Old Man of Storr holding their own.

The what is it Carn Ban can be seen to north and still looks like a cairn after all of these years.

From the village follow Gladman's directions, we parked near the tiny astro turf football pitch. Once on the flat look for a green mound, this contains the chamber which still has five stones in place. Some kerbs remain on the edge of the site.

Not much left, but worth it for the views, we loved it.

Visited 20/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
7th August 2019ce

Carn Ban (Stone Fort / Dun)

We approached following the same route as the Thelonius's for the first time, and from this side I thought it was dun. Many years ago I'd walked from Garafad (Cadha Riach) and thought it was a cairn. From there, as Gladman says, it looks like a sizeable cairn.

The thing, to me, that made my mind up is when walls fall from a dun (or fort/broch etc) even if on flattish ground, the stone scatter is much bigger, nearby buildings tend to be built next to rather than into (i.e. Eyre Manse cairn), also stones for cairn building tend to be hard to build or the wrong shape for walls (as I know from restoring many old dry steen dykes) whereas stones for duns tend to be built, therefore easier to use.

Anyway that's my thoughts, as for the dun, beautiful views of my old friend The Quiraing, Staffin and everywhere really. Like Canmore I think the entrance is in the north west.

Visited 20/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
6th August 2019ce

Romesdal Bridge (Cairn(s))

My obsession with the end of roads has landed me in all sorts of bother before, normally concerning the state of the road. This time slightly different. From the cairn at Eyre Manse I headed back onto the A87, headed towards Uig before taking the minor road to Romesdal Mill. After asking permission to park I left, leaving A and B to admire the mill and scenery.

The owner at the house said walk along the shore and I'd reach my destination. She didn't know about the ancient monument she could see from her kitchen window. She also omitted mentioning the River Romesdal.

Luckily after falling in a hole of water earlier, the boots were replaced with the wellies. A short walk from cottage to river, and fortunately there appeared to some stones to jump onto. Job done I skipped across the river, climbed up a wee slope, opened a gate and walked straight to the cairn.

This is a well shaped cairn with fantastic views, Dun Cruinn, various Cuillins and ancient sites everywhere else, wonderful. Even better the site appears undamaged, apart from some houking in the centre, sitting at 21m wide being 2m tall. Kerbs do appear surrounding the site but most a grass covered. Cairn material pokes it head thru all over. Little known, it gives a resonably close neighbour a run for its money.

This was the last site of the day so quickly back to the car and up to Uig for something to eat before finding our accomodation near Duntulm. Quickly became slowly as the stones that had marked the crossing point had vanished, the tide had come in. Trying to cross I found the wellies weren't going to be high enough so upstream I went and found a place with plenty rocks to jump onto and get across. No falling into the deep pools for me.

With Highland Cattle safely in the next field, I made my away across a field to come out a little way west of the Romesdal Mill.

A great day rummaging around on the way to Uig.

Visited 19//7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
6th August 2019ce

Boleigh (Fogou)

I first tried to get a look at Boleigh Fogou last year in 2018, and like Carl I tried the phone number numerous times but got no joy. So me and Eric tried to sneak in, from two different directions, but without knowing exactly where the fogou is we failed miserably and gave up. Disappointed.

July 2019 and we're back for round two, obviously sneaking isn't going to get us anywhere, so the only other option is a frontal assault, straight up the driveway, they wont be expecting that.
Parking was obtained on the B3315 there is a little muddy layby just east of the entrance to Rosemerryn house. Walked back up the road to the driveway entrance and engaged in the assault. But we came upon the first defenses all too soon, a hand written sign asking people who want to see the fogou to please ring this number. Canny Rosemerryn inhabitants.
I got me phone out and looked through my contacts and lo and behold the number on the sign was the same number I'd tried last year. So with the faintest of sighs and the fastest of vanishing hopes I rang the number. It was to my amazement that it was answered almost immediately, I told the chap on the phone that I was half way up his driveway by a sign asking me to ring, and can we have a look at your fogou please?
The man from Boleigh, he say Yes!

We walked on down the driveway and met him by the house, he said hello and thanked me for ringing, he did point out that we should've rang further in advance, and I said we didn't know about ringing at all, and have come seeking fogou's out of the blue. A lie, and I'm sorry, but only a white lie to keep his sensibilities intact. Anyway, all was good and he showed us the way, only a minute later and we're at the entrance to Fogou.
When he left us to it and went about his business we had it all to ourselves, I've wanted to come here for twenty years at least, but saved it til last because of difficulties getting to it, of all the surviving get into-able fogous this is the last one, and I'm finally here, I was so excited I could pop, goosebumps, shortness of breath, dizzyness, I'd better get in before I faint.
As soon as your in, the creep entrance is immediately left, I walk past it to the far end of the Fogou, it is open, and looks to be an old break in point, stone is missing and it is all open. Back to the entrance and I have a look through the portal stones of the creep entrance and go through. Straight away a stone is on the floor right below a gap in the roof where some corrugated sheet metal now does the job of opposing collapse. Getting past the fallen stone the creep ends quite quickly. Lights off sit quietly. After a while I emerge back into the world, Eric is still looking at his phone, he cant have internet here surely. I have a look at the broken back end and then the bloke is back and he's brought his dog and cat with him. we stand around talking for a while, what's it for, we both agreed on some ritual purpose. He mentioned time team were here, and I remembered the episode he was talking about, they were digging a ruined fogou elsewhere but they wanted a more intact individual so they came here, with a dowser, I remember Professor Mick wasn't impressed.

The Rosemerryn man was not going away now so I took a hint and said thank you very very much but we must go now, he lead us away through the woods, across a lawn (that was as far as we got last time) through more woods (been here before) and with in sight of the car. Bang, Boleigh done, I can excise it from my obsessive mind. I'll probably be back in these parts again at least once and i'll go have a look at Lower Boscaswell Fogou, but really I feel I've done fogous now and I can turn my attention else where, Brochs maybe, I haven't seen enough Brochs.
postman Posted by postman
4th August 2019ce
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