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Steinkiste von Flögeln (Cist)

The stone cist of Flögeln was covered by a burial mound with a diameter of about 28 m and a height of 2.3 m. It formed the center of a large burial ground, which was archaeologically examined since 1956. The stone cist is eccentric in a round stone setting of 8.5 m diameter. The cist consists of five plate-like side stones and the capstone. It is 1.45 m long, 0.94 m wide and 0.52 m high. The bottom was mainly a 1.10 × 0.6 m stone slab.

To get to the stone cist you drive from Westwanna (north) coming immediately after the village entrance of Flögeln to the right (west) into the street Im Seegen. Follow this road for about 2 km before turning left (south) and after another 500 m you will see the stone cist signposted on the right side of the road.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
13th October 2019ce

taken from the on-site information board:

The stone cist of Flögeln

Even at the turn of the century, the stone cist was hidden in a heathland under a huge grave mound and formed the center of a large burial ground, which is largely destroyed today. When, in the post-war years, the destruction process also included this monument, the excavation of the mound began in 1956. The excavations were completed in the summer of 1957. In the course of the investigations, a cremation burial of the younger Bronze Age was found in the mound cover.

After lifting the capstone, an undisturbed burial could be documented: It showed the discoloration of the funeral. The buried was about 1.80 m tall, was on the left with his head at the southeast end of the tomb with his legs up. Although the burial itself was without grave goods, but in the hill structure of a stone cist covering the roll stone packing and sprinkled over sand some shards of the late Neolithic of the early 2 millennium BC were found.

Comparable graves are known in greater numbers in Schleswig-Holstein and Denmark, in the district of Cuxhaven, the site is unique.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th October 2019ce

Westerwanna 10 (Passage Grave)

About 3.5 km south of Westerwanna lies a group of three tombs: Westerwanna 08, Westerwanna 09 and Westerwanna 10. Westerwanna 08 and Westerwanna 09 are both heavily destroyed, Westerwanna 10 is by far the best of the three tombs.

Westerwanna 10 is a passage grave. The chamber is about 7.5 m x 3.5 m, all supporting stones seem to be in situ. From the once four capstones, two are missing, one is fallen into the chamber and the westernmost is broken in two pieces. This massive capstone has several cupmarks. Around the chamber I found at least three bigger stones in the proximity, which could be the remains of an enclosure.

Drive from Westerwanna southward on the Speckenweg. After you passed Wester-Süderleda, the road turn left, turn right (south) here on the K18. After about 1.5 km the road forks, take the left road Am hohen Kopf. After about 600 m (and 275 m after driving into the forest), there is a parking area on the left (for Westerwanna 08 and Westerwanna 09 park here), park here. Continue for another 300 m, before a small blue sign on the left side shows you the way to the tomb (from the south the sign probably better recognizable). Parking is available at the roadside on the left side. Access is quite easy, simply follow the forest track marked by the blue sign from the road for about 365 m, which leads straight to the tomb.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
5th October 2019ce

Westerwanna 09 (Chambered Tomb)

About 3.5 km south of Westerwanna lies a group of three tombs: Westerwanna 08, Westerwanna 09 and Westerwanna 10. Westerwanna 08 and Westerwanna 09 are both heavily destroyed, Westerwanna 10 is by far the best of the three tombs.

Only three stones are still visible, the other stones are either overgrown or removed. To find the grave a GPS device is recommended.

Drive from Westerwanna southward on the Speckenweg. After you passed Wester-Süderleda, the road turn left, turn right (south) here on the K18. After about 1.5 km the road forks, take the left road Am hohen Kopf. After about 600 m (and 275 m after driving into the forest), there is a parking area on the left, park here.

Cross the road and enter the forest track on the other side of the road. Walk west for about 360 m, the track turns right just before the edge of the forest. Follow the track to the right for about 75 m. Westerwanna 08 is located then only 10 m right of the way in the wood. Continue eastward through the wood for about 50 m. The tomb is located on top of a small mound.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
4th October 2019ce

Westerwanna 08 (Chambered Tomb)

About 3.5 km south of Westerwanna lies a group of three tombs: Westerwanna 08, Westerwanna 09 and Westerwanna 10. Westerwanna 08 and Westerwanna 09 are both heavily destroyed, Westerwanna 10 is by far the best of the three tombs.

Only three stones within a flat barrow are all that remains from Westerwanna 08.

Drive from Westerwanna southward on the Speckenweg. After you passed Wester-Süderleda, the road turn left, turn right (south) here on the K18. After about 1.5 km the road forks, take the left road Am hohen Kopf. After about 600 m (and 275 m after driving into the forest), there is a parking area on the left, park here.

Cross the road and enter the forest track on the other side of the road. Walk west for about 360 m, the track turns right just before the edge of the forest. Follow the track to the right for about 75 m. The tomb is located then only 10 m right of the way in the wood.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
4th October 2019ce

Westerwanna 12 (Chambered Tomb)

Westerwanna 12 is located near a side street on a private field. During my visit, a herd of cattle grazed in the field and the pasture was fenced with barbed wire. That's why I only took a few zoom shots.

According to some sources, only the four capstones are visible, which are all still in situ. All other remains seems to be sunken into or have become overgrown by the moor.

Drive eastwards through Ahlen-Falkenberg on the Ahlenstraße. In a slight left bend, about 700 m after the village end, turn right into the street Am Reiherholz. The tomb is located after two slight left turns about 800 meters on the right under a group of trees fenced in the field.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
4th October 2019ce

Bleaberry Haws Cairn (Cairn(s))

From the summit cairn of Bleaberry Haws (Follow directions for stone circle) I head off towards the big mountain the "Old man". First a strange linear feature is crossed, it's named as a dyke but it's exact function is I presume being guessed at.
Another hundred yards or so in the same direction is the cairn. A cairn, after several thousand years can take on a different shape depending on what's occurred there, some more pleasing to the eye than others. This cairn to my eye is very pleasing, the depth of the hole at it's center, the height of the cairn, the percentage of clear stone to grassed over stone, the fabulous views, the nearby rocky outcrop, all these things make you just wander round it, staring in wonder, sitting and staring in wonder. What a wonderful place.
Off to the ring cairn now.
postman Posted by postman
29th September 2019ce

Bleaberry Haws Summit Cairn (Cairn(s))

Follow directions for the stone circle and then just head up.
Crowning the summit of Bleaberry Haws is a small modern walkers cairn but it sits on a much wider obvious bronze age cairn. The views are spellbinding in all directions, but it's the Old Man of Coniston that holds your attention. While looking towards the Old Man bring your gaze down to ground level and in the distance is a cairn to which I'm off to next but between us is the odd linear feature or Dyke.
postman Posted by postman
29th September 2019ce

Bleaberry Haws (Stone Circle)

I've been putting this one off for literally decades, there always seemed to be bigger fish to fry, and a long, perhaps difficult walk to seven little stones. Little stones or not, it's a stone circle, i'm going to have a look, one day. That one day ends up being today, well, over a week ago now.
It's the weekend of the autumn equinox and I've been out and about all day, this is site number five and the last port of call today. Desperate to make an easier job of it than Fitzcoraldo did, he definitely seems to have gone the hard and long way, but at least at the end of his notes he suggests another route, the quarry track to the south west does look better.

I was hoping to drive up the track a bit but the gate was locked, so I had to park at the entrance and walk up it. Having arrived at the tracks left hand hairpin, we depart right, cross over a low point in the wall and head towards the grassy hill that is Bleaberry Haws, directly behind the grassy hill is the Iconic south Lakes mountain The Old Man of Coniston.
It doesn't take long before the summit isn't far off, although the summit is where i'm heading it isn't where I'm looking, the mountains are pretty over powering attracting ones gaze and keeping it, i'm falling about the place whilst not looking where I'm going, but just then, over to my left I can see some grey blobs just above the grass line and I know I have found the stones. I without doubt let out a little whoop.

The stones are certainly small, seven in number and unequally spaced suggesting missing stones, perhaps only a couple though. I sit for a while on the largest stone drinking in the grand mountain view, it's also pretty good in the other direction down to the shimmering waters of the Duddon estuary and the Irish sea. This place has me incredulous, why did I put it off for so long? I absolutely should have been here before now, but being here today with such perfect weather, not a cloud to be seen, or perhaps there was a cloud or two but my sunny demeanor just edits them out, nothing could mire this sublime moment and place.
The only thing that could possibly have made it better is Scarlett Johansson insisting on holding my hand throughout. Failing that the Old Man will do.

The stone circle isn't the only ancient site up here, there's a cairn or two a ring cairn and some sort of Dyke thing, so that's where I'm off to now, starting off with the summit cairn north east of the circle. But Ill return to it on my way back to the car.
postman Posted by postman
29th September 2019ce

Tigh Cloiche (Chambered Cairn)

Like Greywether I thought the Canmore fieldnotes a tad harsh as it looks like, to me, that someone (must have been a giant) has roughly pushed the whole thing side ways. Capstones have been scattered but the chamber appears 'reasonably' all there but fallen in. Side stones, as described by Greywether, remain in place.

Both of us seem to agree more with Henshall's description :

Tigh Chloiche, South Clettraval, a chambered cairn, has been much disturbed by secondary buildings and its present form bears little relationship to its original plan.

The narrow and almost parallel-sided chamber is surrounded on the N, E and S by traces of what appear to be circular buildings. Four orthostats of the chamber remain on the SW but the northern part cannot be traced. The entrance was from the E but nothing can be seen of the passage walls. Large flat stone slabs lie displaced outside the chamber and, whereas the extent of the cairn is fairly well marked to the N. and E., it drops to an extensive low spread to the S and SE.

Finds of potsherds are in the National Museum of Antiquities of Scotland (NMAS).

A S Henshall 1972, visited 2 May 1962.


The size of the site, almost 19m wide and 1.5m tall, suggest cairn. Nobody can dispute the views!

Visited 24/7/209.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
26th September 2019ce

South Clettraval (Standing Stone / Menhir)

The second standing stone at Clettraval is short walk of about 300m south west. Sites uphill i.e. the wheelhouse/chamber cairn/standing stone can all be seen.

Absolutely fantastic views of Baleshare, Pabeil and loch after loch after loch. The single hill on Benbecula can also be seen.

The granite stone stands at almost 1.2m, as well as the views it points the way to Tigh Cloiche.

Visited 24/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
26th September 2019ce

South Clettraval (Standing Stone / Menhir)

This 'forgotten' standing stone is only a short distance to the north west of the wheelhouse/chamber cairn. Only a small fence to jump.

Standing at 2m wide and 1.5m it gives us clear views to the cairn at Corary and the possible chamber cairn at Cleitreabhal A Tuath. Also on a very clear day, St. Kilda.

A fine start to wandering about the Clettraval sites.

Visited 24/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
26th September 2019ce

Westerwanna 07 (Passage Grave)

Westerwanna 07 is an impressive passage grave, located on private land, but fortuantely now with an public access path, so a visit is quite easy. The chamber has three pair of support stones and an end stone on each end of the chamber. All uprights and the western capstone are still in situ. The size of the chamber size is approximately 5,4m x 3,5m. The easternmost capstone is missing, the middle capstone is broken in two halfs. There is a large tree growing in the center of the chamber, which damages the tomb's structure.

The alternative name Karlskirche (Karl = Charles) derives from a legend that Charlemagne came to this tomb on his way north across the moorland.

You drive on the Ahlenstraße from west to east through Ahlen-Falkenberg and turn right at the second street (south), which is named Seestraße. After about 500 m you should see a green bench and a sign on the right, showing the entrance to a public path, that leads in about 100 m directly to the tomb.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
25th September 2019ce

Corary (Cairn(s))

Corary is a massive cairn that stands over 27m wide and is 1.5m tall. Most of the stones have been recycled to make a very large sheepfold, being plonked on top of their original position. Two upright slabs remain at the edge of the cairn, others have been built into the walls or used as entrances.

From Dun Grogary I returned to the minor road and headed straight across A865 onto the tarred road opposite. This leads to the Clettraval viewpoint and various military stuff at the top of Cleitreabhal A Deas. Pass the quarry and look for a gate on the west side of the road. This has a track, of sorts, which leads straight to the site via a bog.

A bit of a 'what if' but worth a visit whilst on the way to the more well known sites further uphill.

Visited 24/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
25th September 2019ce

Sampson's Bratfull (Long Cairn)

I'm here, the enthusiast has arrived (See Treehuggers fieldnotes).
Mr Hugger was right, the walk was not easy.
Walking is really overrated, I try to avoid it where ever I can, to that end I drove the car up the very often bumpy farm track, and when that ended and turned into a forestry track I drove up that too. In the end I parked at the south edge of Blengdale forest, by where the map says homestead, saved me a couple of ankle twisting miles, but there was at least four more to come.
The walk through the forest was easy enough, a good if up hill track, straight as you like. Until it ends at the River Bleng, where there is no bridge, I doubt the river gets much lower than when I saw it, you could, if fleet of foot stepping stone it across, I turned left and saw a gate across the river which I could shimmy across, you don't get much chance of shimmying these days so I was glad of the opportunity. Once across I walk back down the river until I'm opposite the footpath that brought me to the river, I couldn't find my compass so I'm going on wisdom and blind luck. With the path behind me, map in hand, my hand points north turn slightly right and onward.

It's quite steep going up from the river, but it soon levels out. The steepness is now replaced by a wind that definitely has somewhere to be, and that crap kind of tussocky ground/grass, the going was rough and slow, and quite a bit sweary.
My predecessor also noted many cairns on the way, he wasn't joking about that either, there is loads of them, surely they can't be all burial cairns, barely a foot high but ten feet across is the average footprint of them, some are in rows, none have a cist surviving. There among the small cairns is the whopper, the big one, The Bratfull that belongeth to Sampson.
I don't know when I first heard the name of Sampson's Bratfull (What is a Bratfull?) it was so long ago I don't even know where I heard it, but it's been in my head rattling around like the last grape in the fruit bowl. So in the spirit of getting things done here I am.
It's about seventy feet from end to end and aligned I think NW/SE. They could have put it on top of the hill on Stockdale moor, with some good mountain views, but instead they opted for the sea view. I'm now on mission number four of today's equinox jaunt and so far they've all had sea views.

I sit for a while in one of the excavations in the long cairn, of which there are three, keeping out of the wind, it's so strong walking on the uneven cobbles of the cairn was dangerous to impossible, and getting knocked about whilst trying to get that higher view by holding the tripod aloft was getting me very angry. I told the wind it was stupid, it didn't care. All too soon it was time to go, not back to the car, but further up the hill where there is a string of three very definite burial cairns, big and crazy with exciting mountain views.
postman Posted by postman
23rd September 2019ce

Druids Temple, Yewcroft (Stone Circle)

Six years ago this stone circle was rescued, is that the right word? Old maps called the field Druids Temple, and in the bank under the hedge of said field were a number of large granite boulders, now we have a stone circle. Not all the stones found have made it into the reconstruction, some still reside in the hedge getting re-overgrown. There are over thirty pictures of the reconstruction on Facebook, but no information on how they found the stone holes, or if they even did, did they make their own circle, are stones in backwards or upside down. Tma'ers of the 22nd century might scoff at it's shoddy reconstruction, or they may applaud, who knows.

There are some pictures of the reconstruction on the Megalithic Portal, and also the warning "NO ACCESS IS ALLOWED YET", and "We intend a welcome sign to go up eventually. However enquirers should be patient for a few months more".
But that was, as far as I can tell six years ago, statute of limitations and all that, so off I go to the Druids Temple, Yewcroft stone circle (Rstd).

From Egremont go east to Wilton, exit Wilton east and look for a concreted farm track going right, if diplomacy and frontal assaults are your thing the stone circle is down there on your left, good luck. If though like me your a ninja at heart and sneaking about is your thing pass the concrete farm track and follow the road as it bends right and park on a gravel layby for one and walk up the road. The first gate you get to is the stones field. It's in open view of the house, at which I presume the land owners preside, so I entered the field at it's other corner and followed the hedge down the slope to the stones.
At the stones, there is a barbed wire fence around the stones, so I tore it down and went in (that's a lie, it was like that when I got here). I don't intend to stay long, this is just mission number two out of five for today's equinox jaunt, so I start photography straight away, no messing about.
Half way through, a silver car went past, it's a dead end road so there's a fair chance that's the land owner, did they see me, I couldn't tell, so I went over and stood by the gate and waited, but no one came so I continued with photography. Then I stood around for a bit, staring apparently blankly into space, but cogs and gears were a blur in my head, thoughts chasing each other round my mind pushing and shoving. Thoughts like how close to the original is it?(that's really ten questions) is that stone supposed to be like that or has it fallen over all ready? am I allowed to be here? shall I go? The last thought won out so onto mission three.

So what did I think of Yewcroft stone circle?
I liked it a lot, but i'm suspicious of it, like that Nigerian princess that e-mailed last night.
Reconstructions are rare occurrences, outside of Cornwall anyway, so we should be glad that the site page should read Restored not Destroyed.
postman Posted by postman
23rd September 2019ce

Greycroft Stone Circle

It's that time of year again, where one simply has to get up really early and drive really far away in order to stand around in a field waiting as the world slowly rotates.
They're something I look forward to, equinoxes, and this one turned out really well.

On the M6 by 3.30am, a wee diversion round a closure
at junction 33, then a nice comfortable drive all the way to Seascale, no rushing about, cool and calm, got there early. But forgot to bring a coat, I might not need it later but standing round in fields before the sun has risen can get a bit nippy. Hey ho.
I parked the car on the wide grass verge by the gate near the bridge, you can see the stones from here. What you cant see anymore is the old ruined mill, it's been demolished to a height of a couple of feet and been landscaped into a place of local interest with information board, it mentions Greycroft stone circle, but barely.
Walking on, I make a bee line for the stones, with no agriculture to impede progress I reach the stones in quick time.
By my calculations I still have twenty minutes before the sun comes up, allowing for the slight hill between us.

Whilst standing round taking note of the stones, I noticed the big concrete cooling towers have gone, were they gone last time I came, it's been thirteen years, I cant remember. (29th September, so no) They've also put up two rows of super fences all the way round, they look new, I climbed over it and then up the big bank last time to get a heightened view of the circle. Not anymore.

Holy crap the sun's coming, look lively.
The eastern sky was as clear a sky as I've ever seen on an equinox, it's almost too perfect, just a tiny sprinkling of clouds might have been better, photographing directly into the sun isn't what I'm best at. Nor is being there exactly on the equinox either it's on the 23rd this year, and there's me booking the week before off. But as they say, hey ho.

I manically rush about trying to catch the light while it's at it's best, the sunshine glitters across the stones and sparkles in the grasses dew, and I forget the cold for a while.
It's not really an equinox sunrise type place, the summer solstice, that's another matter, the sun would come up out of some unobscured gorgeous mountain pass I presume.
A sunset would be good with wide open sea views all along the west side, perhaps coincidentally directly west of Greycroft is the northern tip of the Isle of Man. George says there are no coincidences.

The sun has now well and truly risen, that's mission accomplished, I've been here an hour and a half, taken 152 photos, and seen something that's only been seen by a handful of people since the stones went into disuse.
Speaking of disused stones I'm off somewhere a little bit special next, and it involves a little sneak, and I do love a little sneak.
postman Posted by postman
23rd September 2019ce

Westerwanna 06 (Passage Grave)

Westerwanna 06 is fenced in a field under a group of birch trees and is considerable overgrown. You only see three capstones, the rest of the tomb is probably sunken in the moor.

You drive on the Ahlenstraße from west to east through Ahlen-Falkenberg and turn right at the first street (south). After about 540 m, the tomb lies just a few meters from the road in a field on the ride side. To better recognize the structures, a visit in winter is recommended.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
22nd September 2019ce
Edited 25th September 2019ce

Midlum 2 (Passage Grave)

Midlum 2 is a passage grave consisting of four capstones, three of which are still in situ. One of the two middle capstones lies broken in the chamber. Four support stones per side and two end stones formed the walls of the chamber, one of the support stones on the southeast side is missing. On one of the capstones are some small cups.

To get to the tomb you have to walk a little, because it is a bit away in the forest. You drive from Wanhöden on the Wanhödener Straße towards Wursterheide. Even before turning left into the forest to the tomb Midlum 1, take the road An der Ludenhütte to the left and head south towards Midlumer Heide or Midlumer Moor. Park the car on a left-side bend of the road immediately on the edge of the forest. A wide forest road leads here to the right in the direction of (north) west. After about 750 m you come to a crossroads, here you take the way to the left in a southerly direction. After another 360 m you come to another intersection and take the path to the right. The tomb is then about 200 meters directly on the right side of the path.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
22nd September 2019ce

Midlum 1 (Chambered Tomb)

From the megalithic tomb Midlum 1 only the western part of a larger burial chamber is preserved. A large capstone and 3 supporting stones are still preserved in situ and look like the remains of a simple dolmen, as well as one can still see clearly the remains of an approximately 6 m long burial mound, which suggests that it might be a passage grave, typical for the region. The alternative name Henkenstein (roughly translated to hangman stone or stone where someone was hanged) suggests that the tomb may have served as a court place or a place of worship earlier.

Drive from Wanhöden on the Wanhödener Straße towards Wursterheide. Shortly before you pass under the Autobahn A27, a road turns left into the forest. Follow this road and park your car on the left, just before you reach a small bridge over the A27. Cross the road and walk towards the bridge, about 100 m before the A27 a small beaten track (watch out for the wooden sign), leads into the woods. The tomb is only 50 m in the woods on a small clearing, you should already see it from the start of the beaten track. Apart from the noise of the highway, a dreamy and enchanted place.

Visited June 2019
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
22nd September 2019ce

Punchestown Standing Stone (Standing Stone / Menhir)

At the north-west corner of the field there is a service entrance to Punchestown racecourse. The gate is sometimes open but if it isn't there is a hurdlable wall. Over this and back into the corner, the fence into the pasture field that holds the stone is easily surmountable. The hedging and fencing that line the road are impossible. (If you're not into leaping the medium-difficult wall you can walk up to the actual racecourse entrance a couple of hundred yards up the road and come back to this point. The racecourse allows dog-walkers and strollers and is a popular amenity for the denizens of Naas up the road)

There is a footworn track from the field corner to the stone so people are still determined to visit despite the obstacles. The stone itself is magnificent, the views north blocked but those south-east towards the Wicklow mountains fine. An old info sign has been trashed and thrown into the battered enclosure, the cement that holds the stone up after it was re-ercted in 1934 visible but not too obtrusive.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
20th September 2019ce

Craddockstown West (Standing Stone / Menhir)

Facing the stone with the racecourse entrance at your back, look to the right and there is a gap in the hedge. Over the fence into the neighbouring field and then through the ungated entrance. The hurdle of the fence is low to medium difficult.

The stone sits atop a slight ridge, over 4 metres tall and leaning to the west. It still has its original packing stones, continuing to do their job down through the millenia. Views all around are pleasant if unspectacular but this is still an essential site if your're in the Dublin area.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
20th September 2019ce

Dun Grogary (Stone Fort / Dun)

Dun Grogary appears to be on a promontory but it is a case of landfill being put in and around the causeway, traces of which can still be seen heading west to higher ground.

The site is 13m wide and 1.5m tall, the surrounding wall having fallen. Be sure if visiting this site you take appropriate footwear as the approach is extremely boggy.

From Dun Scarie follow the road as it briefly nears the coast and head back east. I parked at the stream at the north west of Loch Grogary.

Lovely site but boggy approach.

Visited 24/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
18th September 2019ce

Dun Scarie (Stone Fort / Dun)

The Iron Age people built a dun on the island in Loch Sgaraigh and later people used the site to build three further buildings.

Sadly not much else remains on the turf covered site except the causeway heading to the west, mostly submerged.

After Balranald on the A865, head north and take the first minor road heading west (this leads to a camp site). Loch Scaraigh is the first loch to the south, a track just beyond the loch on the minor road leads straight to the site.

Visited 24/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
18th September 2019ce

Craig Hasten (Natural Rock Feature)

Up very early to start another day and a welcome visitor, the sun was shining :-)

Craig Hasten supposedly has a standing stone. I looked everywhere on the rocky crag but couldn't find anything, stones that looked fallen appeared, to me, to be bedrock. On the verge of giving up I decided to have a look over to the Atlantic on the crags North West side and came across which I assume is a natural feature.

It would be hard not to imagine this as a meeting place in ancient times, indeed it seems like the crag should have had a dun/fort/broch built on top as it is a superb defensive location. So I think the locals of the time must have treated this stone and area with some reverence. Local legend has this as the house of the fairies. Easy to imagine why, great views.

At Bayhead on the A865, near the petrol station, take the road heading past the school, take the first road heading west and keep going until the first sharp corner at the farm. Plenty room for parking.

Nice to see the stone but it almost defies belief that this area wasn't used for anything else.

Visited 24/7/2019.
drewbhoy Posted by drewbhoy
18th September 2019ce
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