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Coxall Knoll

Hillfort

<b>Coxall Knoll</b>Posted by GLADMANImage © Robert Gladstone
Also known as:
  • Frog Stone

Nearest Town:Knighton (8km WSW)
OS Ref (GB):   SO366734 / Sheets: 137, 148
Latitude:52° 21' 16.35" N
Longitude:   2° 55' 51.56" W

Added by Rhiannon


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<b>Coxall Knoll</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Coxall Knoll</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Coxall Knoll</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Coxall Knoll</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Coxall Knoll</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Coxall Knoll</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Coxall Knoll</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Coxall Knoll</b>Posted by GLADMAN <b>Coxall Knoll</b>Posted by GLADMAN

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This hillfort perches on the convenient natural hill of Coxall Knoll, which lies on the county boundary and between the River Teme and the River Redlake. The hillsides are naturally steep, but were artificially steepened: there's an 8-12m drop from the top of some of the banks to the bottom of the ditches. There's a complex of enclosures within enclosures - perhaps some of the banks were left unfinished.

In the northerly section there is a recumbent stone, 1.5m x 1.5m x 0.5m. It's known as the Frog Stone because of its alleged resemblance to a crouching frog. The Herefordshire SMR suggests the stone was once upright, and points to the uneven wear on its surfaces as evidence (the record at Magic says this is glacial erosion on its upper surface). They add that the stone faces north east over the Clun valley, and so may have been deliberately positioned by the hillfort builders, or perhaps by earlier inhabitants of the area.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
17th July 2006ce