The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian



Long Barrow

Also known as:
  • Lamborough Lane
  • Monument No. 234857

Nearest Town:Winchester (11km W)
OS Ref (GB):   SU592283 / Sheet: 185
Latitude:51° 3' 1.5" N
Longitude:   1° 9' 19.18" W

Added by dickie

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Park opposite turn for Hinton Ampner on layby and walk north up Wayfarers Way. Past house at top of metalled path to crossroads of byways. Turn Left /West and Barrow is in field on the right after 200 yrds - dickie Posted by dickie
1st November 2005ce


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Details of long barrow on Pastscape

(SU 59272839) Tumuli (NR) (Two shown). Long Barrow (NR).
"Probably a double or triple barrow. Chalk on clay, ploughed". "On second visit I decided that this is a true long barrow with side-ditches". Shown and described as a long barrow, No 44.
Excavated by Canon Milner. Four trenches were cut in order to ascertain whether the big ditches had existed which characteristically flanked long barrows. The first, which was dug down to the level, undisturbed chalk from the rise of the
barrow in a northerly direction across the central depression revealed a ditch 20' wide and 7'9" deep.
A series of trial pits subsequently connected up into a trench 40' long were dug at the east end about 12' north of the axis of the barrow in order to discover whether the ditch continued round that end or gave place to a causeway. Undisturbed chalk proved that there was no ditch.
The third trench was dug to a depth of 5' parallel to and at a distance of 10' north of the second. The ditch was again in evidence here.
A narrow experimental trench was dug from the north side into the middle of the mound in order to follow up a seam of dark earth. This ran right into the barrow at the level of the ancient undisturbed surface and was evidently the original top-soil of the ditch. Except for this dark earth the trench into the barrow revealed nothing whatever but chalk.
All the evidence points to a Neolithic long barrow, a rare work in this neighbourhood. During the excavations a sherd of Peterborough Ware was found - part of the rim of a bowl with finger-nail decoration. (6)
The barrow, although in arable land and xloughed, is well preserved and distinct. It is 70.0m. long and 36.0m. in maximum width, the height being 1.7m. at the east end and 0.4m. lower than this at the west end. The side ditches are visible. At the east end an old shallow quarry pit encroaches slightly on the mound.
Chance Posted by Chance
7th June 2014ce