The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

     

Blackpark Plantation

Stone Circle

<b>Blackpark Plantation</b>Posted by greywetherImage © greywether
Also known as:
  • Kingarth

Nearest Town:Rothesay (8km NNW)
OS Ref (GB):   NS091556 / Sheet: 63
Latitude:55° 45' 21.32" N
Longitude:   5° 2' 33.19" W

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Fieldnotes

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Visited 1.8.2016

Directions:
At the southern end of Bute take the minor road south off the A844 near Kingarth. This is signposted for St Blane's Church (Historic Scotland site). You will drive past trees to our left. Take the first turning you come to on your left which leads to a small parking area next to the trees. From the parking area follow the 'path' through the ferns, into the trees, to discover the circle.


There is an information board at the car park showing the circle (and other sites) but the sign from the roadside has fallen down (hence the reason we drove past the parking area - twice!) It is only a 1 minute walk to the stones.

it has to be said, there is something special about seeing standing stones in a woodland setting - even if it is a plantation. The sun was shining brightly but the density of the trees left the circle in a sort of twilight. The first stone you come to has a metal bar helping to keep it standing. It is covered by the wet spongy moss you find in this environment. The other two stones are studded with quartz chips - some quite large. The smallest stone is built into a mound which allows all the stones to be of a similar height. This is something I can't remember seeing before? Was this part of 'restoration work' in the past or is this original? The large stone which has split in two reminds me of the stones forming the Ring of Brodger for some reason.

Either way, this is a cracking site to visit and one I would highly recommend. Once you find the parking area this is a very easy stone circle to access. Enjoy!
Posted by CARL
2nd August 2016ce

Look closely at the stones and you will see how much quartz they are composed of.

Similar rock is found round the south of the island. Around 65 million years ago volcanic eruptions around Arran forced molten lava through fissures in the sandstone. The extreme heat metamorphosed the sandstone, baking it white and producing a quartzite rock.

It makes the stones sparkle really beautifully through the moss.
Posted by dancingfish
24th September 2004ce
Edited 24th September 2004ce

This must have been an impressive circle when it was complete.

Signposted and near a road, only three stones remain of seven which were reported in the late 18th century. But even in its depleted state, this is still impressive.

One of the stones measures 2.8m high x 2.2m x 1m and has been split by frost. The other two stones are 2.2m high.

Visited 7 March 2004
greywether Posted by greywether
8th March 2004ce