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Westwood Bowl Barrow

Round Barrow(s)

Nearest Town:Beverley (1km ENE)
OS Ref (GB):   TA018395 / Sheets: 106, 107
Latitude:53° 50' 29.23" N
Longitude:   0° 27' 9.51" W

Added by BrigantesNation


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SMR Entry for Westwood:

MONUMENT: Bowl barrow on Westwood Common, 610m north west of Blackmill
PARISH: BEVERLEY
DISTRICT: EAST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE
COUNTY: EAST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE
NATIONAL MONUMENT NO: 26558
NATIONAL GRID REFERENCE(S): TA01843954
DESCRIPTION OF THE MONUMENT
The monument includes a bowl barrow on the northward side of Westwood Common,
Beverley, 120m to the south of the A1079 York - Beverley Road and 610m north
west of Blackmill. It is one of an important group of prehistoric funerary
earthworks surviving together on Westwood Common, which represents a sizeable
area of land in which prehistoric earthworks have survived because of the
establishment of common grazing rights here in the 14th century AD.
The barrow survives as a visible mound 7m in diameter and up to 0.75m in
height. It is surrounded by a ditch up to 2m wide, which although infilled
through the course of time and now no longer visible at the ground level, will
survive as a buried feature.
There is no indication that this barrow has been excavated in the past, and it
is therefore thought to survive with its burial contents intact.
ASSESSMENT OF IMPORTANCE
Bowl barrows, the most numerous form of round barrow, are funerary monuments
dating from the Late Neolithic period to the Late Bronze Age, with most
examples belonging to the period 2400-1500 BC. They were constructed as
earthen or rubble mounds, sometimes ditched, which covered single or multiple
burials. They occur either in isolation or grouped as cemeteries and often
acted as a focus for burials in later periods. Often superficially similar,
although differing widely in size, they exhibit regional variations in form
and a diversity of burial practices. There are over 10,000 surviving bowl
barrows recorded nationally (many more have already been destroyed), occurring
across most of lowland Britain. Often occupying prominent locations, they are
a major historic element in the modern landscape and their considerable
variation of form and longevity as a monument type provide important
information on the diversity of beliefs and social organisations amongst early
prehistoric communities. They are particularly representative of their period
and a substantial proportion of surviving examples are considered worthy of
protection.
The monument is one of a closely associated group of prehistoric earthworks on
Westwood Common, which includes both square and round barrows, as well as
Romano-British enclosures, linear boundary dykes and a short section of Roman
road. The group has survived as part of a rare landscape characterised by
features dating back as far as the Bronze Age, which has owed its survival to
the granting of common grazing rights to the local people of Beverley in the
14th century AD. The survival of such an extensive area of earthworks is
unusual in this region of East Yorkshire, where arable agricultural practices
have resulted in the destruction of many earthwork remains of monuments above
ground. It offers important insights into ancient land use and territorial
divisions for social, ritual and agricultural purposes in this area and the
development of these through time.
As the monument has not been excavated, it will still contain primary and
secondary burials, and further archaeological information relating to its
construction.
SCHEDULING HISTORY
Monument included in the Schedule on 21st June 1978 as part of:
COUNTY/NUMBER: Humberside 5
NAME: Burial mounds and enclosure on Westwood Common
The reference of this monument is now:
NATIONAL MONUMENT NUMBER: 26558
NAME: Bowl barrow on Westwood Common, 610m north west of Blackmill
SCHEDULING REVISED ON 19th January 1996
Posted by BrigantesNation
24th August 2003ce