The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian


Carreg Wen

Standing Stone / Menhir

<b>Carreg Wen</b>Posted by KammerImage © Simon Marshall
Also known as:
  • Plynlimon-Arwystli Stone
  • Pumlumon-Arwystli Stone
  • Garreg Wen

Nearest Town:Llanidloes (13km E)
OS Ref (GB):   SN829885 / Sheets: 135, 136
Latitude:52° 28' 53.05" N
Longitude:   3° 43' 28.31" W

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<b>Carreg Wen</b>Posted by Kammer <b>Carreg Wen</b>Posted by Kammer <b>Carreg Wen</b>Posted by Kammer <b>Carreg Wen</b>Posted by Kammer


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Visited 13th July 2003: We cheated to get to this one, driving up the forestry tracks from further down the valley (not recommended). The sensible way to reach this stone would be on foot from the peak of Pumlumon. Carreg Wen is on the edge of the forestry plantation to the east of Pumlumon, close to the source of the River Severn. At 610 metres above sea level it's the highest stone in the area. Although very close to the edge of the forest, the stone is surrounded on three sides by trees like some sort of hidden woodland cul-de-sac.

I had both the boys with me, and the weather was scorching. As soon as we arrived, killer flies attacked, so we kept the pace up. The intense sunshine made it hard to look at the stone, because it's made of a brilliant quartz. Near the stone was the remains of a camp fire, and at the foot of the stone I found entwined orange and purple ribbons (non-biodegradable) so I knew quite early on that the spot isn't as obscure as it feels. After spending quite a while taking it all in I spotted naturally formed recesses in the stone that had been used to deposit coins. Most of these had small quartz stones placed in them to block them up.

The flies and heat got to us all in the end, and we left in quite a hurry. I was genuinely surprised to find such a beautiful megalith here. On local standards, it's quite a big'n. Needless to say I was two ribbons, and several copper coins wealthier by the time we left (lucky me!).
Kammer Posted by Kammer
11th August 2003ce
Edited 11th August 2003ce


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There are here two white stones, known as 'y fuwch wen a'r llo,' 'the white cow and calf,' standing close to one another on the moorland near the source of the Severn. They are best approached from Eisteddfa Gurig. The larger of the stones is 6 feet high, and the smaller 4 feet high. no local tradition would seem to be connected with them. -- Visited, 5th July, 1910.
An Inventory of the Ancient and Historical Monuments of the County of Montgomeryshire.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
27th February 2013ce