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Bruan (Broch) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Bruan</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Bruan</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Dun Ban (Camuscross) (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

Visited: August 31, 2020

Dùn Ban is a coastal dùn, hidden from general view on a small rocky headland just south of the community of Camuscross, on Skye. As far as I can tell it is only visible to those who actively seek it out.

To visit this dun you have to venture to the end of the minor road (signed 'Camuscross ¾ mile') that heads south from Isle Oronsay on Skye's south coast. Where the metalled road ends at the south of Camuscross Bay, a private road continues across the stream (Allt na Bèiste) to several houses. Between the 3rd and 4th of these houses, a secluded grassy track heads towards a gate and stile.

Cross this stile and follow the path beyond as it curves round to the left, bringing you to a gate in the fence to the left. Beyond this gate, a rough path heads upwards to the summit of a low hill (Ard Snaoiseaig Cnoc an Fhùdair). From the top, continue seawards and downhill to the dùn, which is now obvious.

On the day of my visit the summit of the dùn was guarded by a large cow (with calves browsing near the coast), rendering it unwise to approach the structure more closely. It will still be there next time I visit Skye!

Dun Ban (Camuscross) (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Dun Ban (Camuscross)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Ban (Camuscross)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dun Ban (Camuscross)</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Dunan Choinnich (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

Visited: August 31, 2020

Dunan Choinnich, which Canmore considers may well be the remains of a broch, must surely be one of the most difficult features of its kind to visit on the entire Isle of Skye.

From the road at Torabhaig Distillery in Teangue, the distance to Dunan Choinnich is exactly one kilometre. But the rugged coastline is not an option: there is no direct path. To reach the dun, start at the distillery where a rough farm track heads off to the right and circles around the Torabhaig buildings before crossing the Allt Ghleann Thorabhaig (a stream). Immedaitely ahead, the path is gated, and an arrow board points to the right where a walkers path follows the stream to the coast. Ahead is a ruined building with a rusted-red roof; pass this and ascend the grassy slope below the ruins of Knock Castle where you should spot a trodden path heading east to a fence.

Straddle this fence and pick up a good walkers' path that hugs the fenceline of the field to the left. This peters out after anout 500 metres, at which point you must descend the shallow valley carrying the Allt Gairistin Neill burn and ascend the prominent 60 metre high hill opposite.

The slopes are bracken covered in summer but there are plentiful grassy tongues which ease the way. From the summit of the hill, you see Dunan Choinnich sitting at the neck of a rocky peninsula. Descent is through somewhat denser vegetation, but there are grassy tongues and sheep paths to ease you down. It took me a full hour to reach Dunan Choinnich from Knock Castle!

Good strong walking boots are an absolute necessity!

Dunan Choinnich is extremely ruinous, though its grassy central court is evident from afar, surrounded by a vegetated rampart to the east and the tumbled, featureless residue of a wall that originally marked its landward boundary. There are only the scantiest remnants of structural detail remaining of a construction that is most definitely a target only for the determined connaisseur!

Dunan Choinnich (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Dunan Choinnich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dunan Choinnich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dunan Choinnich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dunan Choinnich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dunan Choinnich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dunan Choinnich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dunan Choinnich</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Dunan Choinnich</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Tiantulloch (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: August 9, 2020

Only a few hundred metres north of the Minera site, but on the opposite side of the road, are the prominent ruins of Tiantulloch croft house and associated outbuildings: the mound of Tiantulloch broch stands tight against these, rising to a height of some three metres. The remains of this broch are altogether more interesting than Minera and the approach from the road on a clear sunny day is impressive with the distant Caithness mountains framing the site.

So similar is the stonework of the croft buildings with the remaining outer walling courses of the broch that it is difficult to dispel the notion that the broch has been plundered in centuries past to provide their masonry. Notwithstanding, there remains a significant stretch of original exterior broch walling on its eastern side, in many places six and more courses deep.

To visit the site, follow the instructions for Minera but drive up to the Buolfruich Windfarm where verge parking is possible. The field containing the broch is guarded by a barbed wire fence, but if you walk up the road to its northern corner, you will find the final stretch free of barbs to assist access. A short walk over mainly springy turf brings you to the broch.

Tiantulloch (Broch) — Images

<b>Tiantulloch</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tiantulloch</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tiantulloch</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tiantulloch</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tiantulloch</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tiantulloch</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Minera (Broch) — Images

<b>Minera</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Minera</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Minera</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Minera</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Minera</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Minera (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: August 9, 2020

Minera is a largely grassy mound some 3.5 metres tall which Canmore rates as one of the best preserved broch mounds in Caithness. The belief is that the structure contains "substantial structural remains and a largely untouched stratigraphy."

Minera is surrounded by a well-built wall which doubtless consists of stones that were originally exterior walling courses of the broch itself. Nevertheless, there are a considerable number of stones peeking out from the undergrowth and a short stretch where somewhat dilapidated walling is visible. There is a depression running into the mound from the west which contains two large stones which Canmore suggests could have been part of the entrance passage.

To reach Minera, follow the road signed "Houstry 3 miles", a little over quarter of a mile northeast of Dunbeath on the A9, for the full 3 miles till you see the turbines of Buolfruich Windfarm. A short distance before the windfarm, a road branches to the right and there is room to park. Minera is just 200 metres from this junction, probably hidden by the farm outbuildings on the right. To visit, walk about 50 metres up the side road to a field gate, beyond which a well walked path heads past the outbuildings directly to the broch.

Just a few hundred metres farther on is another broch mound, Tiantulloch.

Watenan South (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: August 8, 2020

Watenan is most famed for the neolithic chambered cairn of Cairn O'Get (Garrywhin), and rightly so. But approximately half-way along the waymarked path to the cairn, a low hill rises on the right. It's an easy walk over grass to its 110 metre summit where stand the remains of a broch, Watenan South.

Canmore describes this as a complex site with a circular central earthwork surrounded by linear grassy depressions that might be intra-mural galleries. Two large isolated stones on the east may be related to an entrance passage, and there is evidence of outer defence banks and ditches on the west and south.

On the west of the broch is a stretch of walling courses, and the bank to the south has a number of internal facing stones peeping through the grass.

Not a great site, but it is well worth making your way to the top for the view across the loch.

Watenan South (Broch) — Images

<b>Watenan South</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Watenan South</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Watenan South</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Watenan South</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Watenan South</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Watenan South</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Dunbrae (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: August 6, 2020

The ruined broch at Dunbrae stands about 500 metres north of its more famous sibling at Dunbeath, but is not accessible from the latter. Instead you must take the road signed Houstry 3 about half a kilometre past Dunbeath (when travelling north) and head fror Rhemullen.

The broch stands in the field immediately ahead after you cross the Bridge over the stream. Unfortunately, at the time of my visit this field was occupied by a huge herd of cattle, so the only sight I had of the broch was obteined from the road after circling around the field.

For definitive comment on Dunbrae Broch, see Canmore has to say about Dunbrae broch.

Dunbrae (Broch) — Images

<b>Dunbrae</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Thrumster Little (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: August 8, 2020

The dilapidated remains of Thrumster Little Broch are located a little north of the community of Thrumster on the A9 in Caithness, just a couple of hundred metres along the track to Thrumster Little farm.

The broch is visible from the road as a grassy mound, but as you approach it is seen to possess several courses of ground level walling, comprising quite large, light coloured stones. The interior, however, is completely filled with debris, rising as a grass-covered dome perhaps three metres tall.

On the eastern flank, the exit from the entrance passage can be seen behind the tight embrace of a wire mesh fence.

Thrumster Little (Broch) — Images

<b>Thrumster Little</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Thrumster Little</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Thrumster Little</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Thrumster Little</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Thrumster Little</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Loch Rangag (Broch) — Images

<b>Loch Rangag</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Loch Rangag</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Loch Rangag (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: August 6, 2020

This broch, more commonly known as Greystell Castle (sometimes as Greysteil Castle) stands on a stubby peninsula on the eastern shore of Loch Rangag. The structure is severely dilapidated with a tumble of angular blocks surrounding it. Indeed the only obvious signs of structure are a hint of double wall around the western arc and slight signs of a ruined entrance passage on the east.

It has been suggested that the peninsula might well be a man-made structure, perhaps originally a crannog, though it does seem rather too close to the shore of the loch to be the latter.

The easiest access to Greystell Castle, from the car-park, is to follow the main road south until level with the broch. Although the field below is protected by an electric fence, you will find at this point a narrow break in the fence where the electric wire is safely ensconced in a loop of insulation to allow clear passage. It's just a matter now of descending an easy grassy slope to the stile that gives access to the broch.

Loch Rangag (Broch) — Images

<b>Loch Rangag</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Loch Rangag</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Loch Rangag</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Loch Rangag</b>Posted by LesHamilton
Showing 1-50 of 1,790 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
A keen hillwalker most of my life, my interest was restricted when the need arose to care for an ageing parent.

With limited opportunities to travel far from home, I 'discovered' the world of stone circles, mainly in my native Aberdeenshire.

This provided the ideal opportunity for short walks of just a few hours duration, and resulted in me visiting many places of interest that I had never considered previously.

Website:
Stone Circles of NE Scotland
Here you will find both Google and Bing maps displaying more than 100 sites of stone circles, the majority in my native Aberdeenshire. The markers on the maps are clickable, to reveal a photo of the stone circle and a link to their Canmore Site Record.

A menu at the side of the maps allows you to zoom in to any individual circle, viewing its environs as a zoomable aerial photograph (Google) or an OS Map (Bing).

Hunebedden
I've since extended my interest to the megalithic remains in The Netherlands, where there are some magnificent passage graves known as hunebedden (giant's beds). Despite the fact that The Netherlands is essentially flat and sandy, these 5000 year old monuments from the Funnel Beaker Culture are often found in exquisite woodland settings, nearly all of them in the province of Drenthe. There are almost limitless opportunities for delightful walks between small villages, taking in a diversion to a hunebed here and there.

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