The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

Get the TMA Images feed
LesHamilton

Latest Posts
Showing 1-50 of 1,675 posts. Most recent first | Next 50

Upper Latheron (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: June 17, 2019

The forst impression of Upper Latheron broch is of a ratherless featueless gassy mound. But look more closely and there is structure to be seen.

The broch sits atop a rock which is visible as an outcrop on the northeast of the site. On top of this, a neat course of large walling blocks heads west to a dip that presumably signals the location of the entrance. On the other side of the outcrop is another exposure of outer walling courses: Canmore says four courses deep though only two were visible due to the rank vegetation.

The broch stands in a field at Upper Ltheron farm, just back from the A9, two miles north of Dunbeath. There is space to park at the junction with the farm access road (no signpost) from where the broch is but a short walk away.

Upper Latheron (Broch) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Upper Latheron</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Upper Latheron</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Upper Latheron</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Upper Latheron</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Upper Latheron</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Knockinnon (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: June 17, 2019

There's not a lot to say abut Knockinnon broch. It's just a grassy mound, although there are small exposures of stonework around the structure, hinting that a broch still lurks within.

Knockinnon (Broch) — Images

<b>Knockinnon</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Knockinnon</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Knockinnon</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Thrumster Mains (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: June 19, 2019

This broch at Thrumster Mains has endured a chequered past, principally in the late 19th century, when its court was cleared and the stones of its southern arc were excavated and used to build a rectangular 'Summer House'. Thankfully, the broch is well cared for nowadays and walling up to eight courses high in places now stands at least a metre tall around the remainder of the circumference, with both the inner and outer faces mainly intact.

The broch sits on a low grass-covered ridge in the gronds of Thrumster Mains, in which, at the time of my visit, wide paths had been carefully mowed to make access easier. The broch is now tastefully landscaped as part of an ornamental garden.

The broch was originally believed to be solid based, with its entrance at the location where the summer house now stands, but the most recent excavation (in 2011) discovered both an infilled entrance passage on the northwest, and infilled galleries. Steps leading down into a gallery have also come to light.

Thrumster Mains (Broch) — Images

<b>Thrumster Mains</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Thrumster Mains</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Thrumster Mains</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Thrumster Mains</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Thrumster Mains</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Thrumster Mains</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Thrumster Mains</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Claigan (Dun Breac) (Stone Fort / Dun) — Fieldnotes

Visited: June 25, 2019

One of the tourist attractions on Skye are the so-called Coral Beaches. But just a short walk from the car park are two megalithig relics, Clagain dun and Clagain Souterrain.

To visit the dun, head away from the coast (east) along a well defined farm road for a shade over 500 metres, where you arrive at a metal gate. On your left ia an extensive stone-built sheep fank, and on the rise beyond the gate stand the remains of Clagain. Canmore states thet "Most of the stone was robbed between 1824 and 1836 to build the sheep fank ... and some stone may also have been used in the construction of Claigan farm house and garden".

There is not a great deal to enthuse the visitor here, although grassy ramparts hint at a few buried walling courses and a few larger blocks line a breach in the structure that presumably was the entrance passage.

Claigan souterrain lies a few metres across the fence that surrounds the dun on its south east, and is well worth searching for.

Claigan (Dun Breac) (Stone Fort / Dun) — Images

<b>Claigan (Dun Breac)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Claigan (Dun Breac)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Claigan (Dun Breac)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Claigan (Dun Breac)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Claigan (Dun Breac)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Claigan (Dun Breac)</b>Posted by LesHamilton

East Kinnauld (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: June 17, 2019

Stout footwear (preferably boots) is recommended for a visit to East Kinnauld broch. Although the 100 metre ascent starts along a grassy path, the final ascent is up a steep slope clad in grass and bracken. The broch itself is largely a jumble of tumbled masonry with no external walling courses in evidence although the entrance is clear to see.

That notwithstanding, there is a considerable amount of structure remaining to the discerning eye. A sizeable exposure of internal walling courses still stands, and you can still trace an intramural gallery arcing through the debris and disappearing behind this walling under a small triangular lintel. Adjacent to the entrance passage is a well proportioned guard cell.

And the views over Strath Fleet from this veritable eyrie are simply breath-taking.

East Kinnauld (Broch) — Images

<b>East Kinnauld</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>East Kinnauld</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>East Kinnauld</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>East Kinnauld</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>East Kinnauld</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>East Kinnauld</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk) — Fieldnotes

Visited: June 20, 2019

Carn na Mairg stands on the east bank of the River Thurso, just under a kilometre south from Westerdale. There is an excellent access path which starts 80 metres east of the bridge over the river Thurso. A new dwelling, painted blue-green, stands on your left as you walk across a concrete area to a tall fence. Pass through the gate in this fence and follow the path to the broch. The walking is excellent and the broch soon comes into view.

Carn na Mairg is a grassy mound standing at the very edge of the river. On its eastern flank, a large area of the broch wall is internittently exposed to a height of some fifteen or so courses. There is a well built entrance portal and passage on the southeast, though it was badly overgrown by nettles and on the east are the remains of defensive outworks.

But there is little to see of the interior of the broch, which is almost totally infilled. The only feature is a short section of a mural gallery which is exposed to show the neat walling courses on its inner side.

Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk) — Images

<b>Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk)</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Carn na Mairg (Carn Merk)</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Tulach an Fhuarain (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited:June 20, 2019

The third of a close group of three broch mounds on the bank of the River Thurso in Westerdale, Caithness, Tulach an Fhuarain is a featureless, fenced off grassy mound. It stands cheek by jowl with Tulach Lochain Bhraseil, just 50 metres to its northeast.

Tulach an Fhuarain (Broch) — Images

<b>Tulach an Fhuarain</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Tulach Lochain Bhraseil (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Visited: June 20, 2019

There's not a lot to say about Tulach Lochain Bhraseil except that it is a grassy mound lying 250 metres northwest of Tulach Buaile a'Chroic Broch in Westerdale, Caithness.

Although it is understood that a broch lurks beneath the mound, absolutely no broch-like features are to be seen.

On top of the mound stands a recent man-made structure.

Tulach Lochain Bhraseil (Broch) — Images

<b>Tulach Lochain Bhraseil</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tulach Lochain Bhraseil</b>Posted by LesHamilton<b>Tulach Lochain Bhraseil</b>Posted by LesHamilton

Achvarasdal (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Revisited: June 18, 2019

I revisited Achvarasdal broch once more and was impressed by the improvements made since a year previously.

The entrance passage and the central court of the structure have been cleared of weeds, particularly plants of giant hogweed, and are now tastefully laid out with pink gravel chippings to create a much more pleasant visitor experience.

Members of tbe Caithness Broch Project and Caithness Countryside Volunteers are to be congratulated on their efforts, which include installing layers of geo-textile to inhibit future regrowth.

But the battle is not completely over as a number of mature hogweed plants were spotted within a few metres of the broch wall on the northwest. Hopefully work will continue to achieve total eradication of this dangerous, invasive species.

Broch Clean-up
You can read about the clean-up process in these articles from The John O'Groat Journal and Caithness Courier on April 4, 2019 and April 24, 2019
Showing 1-50 of 1,675 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
A keen hillwalker most of my life, my interest was restricted when the need arose to care for an ageing parent.

With limited opportunities to travel far from home, I 'discovered' the world of stone circles, mainly in my native Aberdeenshire.

This provided the ideal opportunity for short walks of just a few hours duration, and resulted in me visiting many places of interest that I had never considered previously.

Website:
Stone Circles of NE Scotland
Here you will find both Google and Bing maps displaying more than 100 sites of stone circles, the majority in my native Aberdeenshire. The markers on the maps are clickable, to reveal a photo of the stone circle and a link to their Canmore Site Record.

A menu at the side of the maps allows you to zoom in to any individual circle, viewing its environs as a zoomable aerial photograph (Google) or an OS Map (Bing).

Hunebedden
I've since extended my interest to the megalithic remains in The Netherlands, where there are some magnificent passage graves known as hunebedden (giant's beds). Despite the fact that The Netherlands is essentially flat and sandy, these 5000 year old monuments from the Funnel Beaker Culture are often found in exquisite woodland settings, nearly all of them in the province of Drenthe. There are almost limitless opportunities for delightful walks between small villages, taking in a diversion to a hunebed here and there.

My TMA Content: