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Knowe of Burrian (Garth Farm) (Broch) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Knowe of Burrian (Garth Farm)</b>Posted by wideford<b>Knowe of Burrian (Garth Farm)</b>Posted by wideford

Knowe of Burrian (Garth Farm) (Broch) — Fieldnotes

North of Harray Community Hall is the Netherbrough Road. Just past Yeldavale the knowe stands out boldly in the far corner of a field, at this time swamped by bright vegetation vegetation. If only I hadn't already been walking for miles I would have paid a visit despite the blooming plants. It sits on marshy ground thought to have been a lochan. Less than a kilometre further down is another broch, the Knowe of Gullow.From there I went as far as the turn for Ballarat House, where in the field opposite Gullow is what looked like a banked feature which looks equally Iron Age but must be modern as it is not noted anywhere. Burrian's underground structure brings to my mind two Orcadian sites, one where a broch was built over a tomb and another where the supposed broch was purely ceremonial/ritual

Knowe of Burrian (Garth Farm) (Broch) — Miscellaneous

The Knowe of Burrian , NMRS record no. HY31NW 2, was once 60' in diameter and 17 high. A berm seperates south and west sides of broch remains 1.2m high on the flattened top of a steep natural hillock. On the east side are three courses of outer wall face and possible traces of the inner wall face, from which it is estimated that its external diameter is ~18.3m and internal 8.5m.
After several failed digs by other folk Robert Flett of Garth made a go of excavating it in 1936, when a trench found distinct layers of 'hearth-materials' - charcoal, pot-boilers, animal bones, etc - before almost at the other side a slight turn revealed an interior chamber floor. As well as the Pictish Symbol Stone he found some burnt wood, stone tools and ashes. Then came one of those myserious 'wells' . Of two excavations in the centre of the mound the more westerly is the now covered location of an underground chamber. From a vertical entrance approx. 2'6" square eleven steps led steeply down 12' to a 10'x5' flat-roofed figure-of-8 corbelled structure compared to the Gurness well then being dug, though the site was called an earth-house rather than a broch at the time.

The Dwarfie Stane (Chambered Tomb) — Images

<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford<b>The Dwarfie Stane</b>Posted by wideford

Nettletar (Broch) — Images

<b>Nettletar</b>Posted by wideford

Unstan (Cairn(s)) — Images

<b>Unstan</b>Posted by wideford<b>Unstan</b>Posted by wideford<b>Unstan</b>Posted by wideford<b>Unstan</b>Posted by wideford<b>Unstan</b>Posted by wideford<b>Unstan</b>Posted by wideford<b>Unstan</b>Posted by wideford<b>Unstan</b>Posted by wideford<b>Unstan</b>Posted by wideford

The Standing Stones of Stenness (Stone Circle) — Images

<b>The Standing Stones of Stenness</b>Posted by wideford

Maeshowe (Chambered Tomb) — News

no public access


CLOSED September 26th indefinitely owing to traffic concerns

Taversoe Tuick (Chambered Tomb) — Fieldnotes

Entering the enclosure the second thing I noticed after the cairn itself was a shallow trench all around the ege of the mound, and outside that a lot of stones of decent size. Canmore says "bounded by a wall-face of horizontally laid stones. Surrounding the cairn is a spread of loose flat stones forming a sort of platform. An alley, clear of stones, led through it up to the W edge of the cairn". Alley past tense. Before tackling the mound I investigated the other piece of the puzzle. This now has an angled metal door that swings out. This is where a fold-out screen comes in useful, sitting down on the horizontal stone and sticking the camera inside on wide angle. Then up to the main prize. I was very careful with the ladder in the cairn, starting face forward at the start, and the space between the rungs is over-large so that it would be all too easy for the whole leg to slip between them - I would have preferred to have someone with me just in case !

Knowe of Yarso (Chambered Cairn) — Fieldnotes

Just to emphasise it is a really steep climb, a very windy narrow path i places a foot wide. And when it levels out coming to the cairn there is a near vertical drop on the left, so not advisable if the wind is high

North Biggin (Broch) — Images

<b>North Biggin</b>Posted by wideford<b>North Biggin</b>Posted by wideford<b>North Biggin</b>Posted by wideford<b>North Biggin</b>Posted by wideford<b>North Biggin</b>Posted by wideford<b>North Biggin</b>Posted by wideford<b>North Biggin</b>Posted by wideford<b>North Biggin</b>Posted by wideford<b>North Biggin</b>Posted by wideford

North Biggin (Broch) — Fieldnotes

Going north to Dounby the North Bigging Road is a sharp turn on your right with the broch clearly marked on the map, but I approached from the other end after going on to Dounby and turning off there so (hopefully) I could see other sites along the way. After the Holodyke Hunting Lodge (no mere gateway but a grand mansion) the road turns back down to the main road. On the left is a converted wartime building and the broch is in the next field. After I did my work the farmer came to find out why my interest in his "knowe", rather bemused. A very understanding chap and I would suggest speaking with him beforehand as we need more people like him and I enjoyed our brief chat. There are a few exposed parts of the nound but I'd say that from what I saw the "many stones of considerable size" have gone. It also looks to me as if the present SE edge was the border because the field over the dyke is so level, though the report says that the long pit there might be wall core. Near the top of the downhill side is a shallow bowl that could be a cell as a low ridge seems to cut it off, though from the side it does appear like part of a structure heading down to the base of the mound.

North Biggin (Broch) — Miscellaneous

Midhouse/Mithouse NMRS record no. HY32SW 17 at HY30802000, is a large grassy mound SW of Mithouse, 10~12' high and 132' by ~100' orientated NNE/SSW with many large stones on its slopes. In 1935 a small excavation found passageways and massive walls - it is thought to have been a broch as a shallow 54' D depression on top is surrounded by a low irregular bank.

Knowe of Grugar (Broch) — Images

<b>Knowe of Grugar</b>Posted by wideford<b>Knowe of Grugar</b>Posted by wideford<b>Knowe of Grugar</b>Posted by wideford<b>Knowe of Grugar</b>Posted by wideford<b>Knowe of Grugar</b>Posted by wideford<b>Knowe of Grugar</b>Posted by wideford
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Unemployed and so plenty of spare time for researching contributors' questions and queries and for making corrections. Antiquarian and naturalist. Mode of transport shanks's pony. Talent unnecessary endurance. I love brochs.

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