The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Showing 1-20 of 55 news posts. Most recent first | Next 20

County Donegal

Hoard of the Rings - Bronze Age treasure on display


The heaviest intact prehistoric gold hoard ever found in Ireland has gone on public display at the
Donegal County Museum in Letterkenny.

More: https://www.rte.ie/news/ulster/2019/1119/1092820-donegal-gold-hoard/

Knocknarea (Cairn(s))

Conservation plan required for cairn of Queen Maeve atop Knocknarea


A meeting of Sligo County Council has heard there is an incredible amount of damage being done to one of the most significant historic monuments in the country, the stone cairn over Queen Maeve’s grave on the summit of Knocknarea.

Sinn Fein Councillor Chris MacManus says a small number of people climb on top of the cairn while Fine Gael Councillor Sinead Maguire says people can be seen coming down the mountain carrying rocks from the cairn.

A local resident in the area also told Ocean FM News recently that some people have been digging up quartz stones from around the base of the cairn.

More (including a short poscast): https://www.oceanfm.ie/2019/11/12/conservation-plan-required-for-cairn-of-queen-maeve/?fbclid=IwAR1a2nXG8r302c0nimDg6CjVi-rTSgn2ZOhumlnKeEYZfIlfPttgmVOE-xA

Boyne Valley Complex

Archaeologists say they've discovered what could be Neolithic log boats near Newgrange


The river bed of the Boyne is being searched by archaeologists.

ARCHAEOLOGISTS HAVE IDENTIFIED what could be Neolithic log boats as well as boulders, perhaps intended to be used in the building of Newgrange or Knowth, in the river bed of the Boyne, near to the famous monuments.

More: https://jrnl.ie/4878107

France (Country)

Neanderthal footprints found in France offer snapshot of their lives


Scientists find 257 prints that were preserved in wind-driven sand 80,000 years ago

Scientists have found hundreds of perfectly preserved footprints, providing evidence that Neanderthals walked the Normandy coast in France.
The prints suggest a group of 10-13 individuals, mostly children and adolescents, were on the shoreline 80,000 years ago.
Neanderthals, the closest evolutionary cousins to present-day humans and primates, have long been thought to have lived in social groups, but details have been hard to establish.

More: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/sep/10/neanderthal-footprints-found-in-france-offer-snapshot-of-their-lives?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Dinas Dinlle (Cliff Fort)

Dinas Dinlle dig uncovers Iron Age roundhouse and Roman coins


A huge Iron Age roundhouse, thought to be about 2,500 years old, and roman pottery have been uncovered during an archaeological dig at a coastal fort.

Volunteers have joined experts to find out more about the little-known Dinas Dinlle National Trust-owned monument in Gwynedd before it falls into the sea.

The 43ft (13m) wide roundhouse was buried by coastal sand, thought to have blown there during a sandstorm in 1330.

Coins found at the fort near Caernarfon suggest it was occupied in Roman times.

The "well-preserved" roundhouse - with its 8ft (2.5m) thick walls - was uncovered close to the cliff edge buried underneath 3ft (1m) of sand during a two-week dig.

More: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-49397328?ns_mchannel=social&ns_campaign=bbc_wales_news&ns_linkname=wales&ns_source=facebook&fbclid=IwAR0nyySxlVuqawKkRL7-6vl6GmiF38rLZlWAO78mVxWtmVuS46jdmbJoHvw

Boyne Valley Complex

Unknown monuments identified close to Newgrange in 'exceptionally successful' survey


Around 40 previously unknown monuments have been identified in the Brú na Bóinne area close to Newgrange as a result of what a leading archaeologist says was an “exceptionally successful” survey.

Dr Steve Davis of the UCD School of Archaeology, who has worked for over a decade on the Brú na Bóinne landscape, said the monuments appear to range from what are most likely early Neolithic houses to Neolithic timber enclosures as well as Bronze Age burial monuments and some early medieval farmsteads.

The area surveyed included locations both sides of the Boyne, within the bend of the Boyne and across from the megalithic tombs at Newgrange, Knowth and Dowth.

More: https://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/ireland/unknown-monuments-identified-close-to-newgrange-in-exceptionally-successful-survey-942120.html?fbclid=IwAR3TTUaKStOYMnnS8USVbwIZA1p8fw6OA-92zViLJ9r2LoiqAsMhk2NpDdk

County Galway

Replica Iron Age log boat launched on Lough Corrib


A replica of a 2,400-year-old log boat, that lies on the bottom of Lough Corrib, was launched in Co Galway this afternoon.

The prehistoric log boat, built from a single oak timber and some 7.5m long, 0.61m wide and 0.4m deep, has been radiocarbon dated to 754-409 BCE (over 2,400 years ago; the Iron Age).

More: https://www.rte.ie/news/connacht/2019/0706/1060564-galway-log-boat/

Carrowmore Complex

Archaeologists uncover megalithic monument thought to be unlike any found in Ireland to date


More:
https://jrnl.ie/4682855

Shantemon (Stone Row / Alignment)

Ancient hillfort reported damaged in Co Cavan


The National Monuments Service has confirmed that it is investigating a report of serious damage to a 3,000-year-old hillfort near Cavan town.

More: https://www.rte.ie/news/ulster/2019/0610/1054511-cavan-hillfort/

Leicestershire

'Phenomenal' 2,300-year-old bark shield found in Leicestershire


Archaeologists hail iron age object a ‘marvellous, internationally important find’

More: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/may/23/2300-year-old-iron-age-bark-shield-leicestershire?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Beltany (Stone Circle)

Shocking vandalism at ancient Beltany monument


More: https://www.donegaldaily.com/2019/05/03/shocking-vandalism-at-ancient-beltany-monument/?fbclid=IwAR0QpJ2STQLHWGL1YpUbRnQtL1j6k8zXqCLtjREFVAGDz31Ggn8LZjh3Kp0

Stonehenge (Circle henge)

Stonehenge: DNA reveals origin of builders


The ancestors of the people who built Stonehenge travelled west across the Mediterranean before reaching Britain, a study has shown.

Researchers in London compared DNA extracted from Neolithic human remains found in Britain with that of people alive at the same time in Europe.

The Neolithic inhabitants appear to have travelled from Anatolia (modern Turkey) to Iberia before winding their way north.

They reached Britain in about 4,000BC.

Details have been published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.

The migration to Britain was just one part of a general, massive expansion of people out of Anatolia in 6,000BC that introduced farming to Europe.

Before that, Europe was populated by small, travelling groups which hunted animals and gathered wild plants and shellfish.

One group of early farmers followed the river Danube up into Central Europe, but another group travelled west across the Mediterranean.

DNA reveals that Neolithic Britons were largely descended from groups who took the Mediterranean route, either hugging the coast or hopping from island-to-island on boats.

More: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47938188?fbclid=IwAR1Q99kEGMVgXbR2B3qDJcl02Hoocwi5z7uSXw1_OSpeb1ZYpqGrUB98aKc

County Limerick

NMI recovers Bronze Age axe illegally detected in Adare


A miniature Bronze Age axe head was handed over to the National Museum of Ireland after pictures emerged of it on social media.

The axe was discovered through illegal metal detecting in Adare, Co Limerick.

NMI Keeper of Irish Antiquities Maeve Sikora said a member of the public alerted the museum to the images and the axe was recovered following an investigation by gardaí.

More: https://www.rte.ie/news/ireland/2019/0408/1041305-bronze-age-axe-find/

La Hougue de Vinde

Mystery digger ruins 5,000-year-old dolmen


La Hougue de Vinde dolmen near Noirmont has been seriously damaged after someone dug holes all over the 5,000 year old historical site.

A man was seen illegally using a metal detector and a trowel on the ancient site, prompting the island’s heritage organisations to appeal to the public to help protect them.

After an islander reported the incident, Olga Finch, Jersey Heritage’s Curator ofArchaeology, inspected the site. She confirmed that it had been seriously damaged, finding 'backfilled' metal detecting holes in the centre of the chamber, and targeted digging all over the dolmen, particularly in the earthen banks and at the base of the orthostats (upright stones).

More: https://www.bailiwickexpress.com/jsy/news/5000-year-old-dolmen-seriously-damage/?fbclid=IwAR0s4vziAhnZCYVZKJRwR6JIayfx90b4CuOg2mLUEYsegamACx1iajNLAFQ#.XIxalIXeyFr

Stonehenge and its Environs

The battle for the future of Stonehenge


Britain’s favourite monument is stuck in the middle of a bad-tempered row over road traffic. By Charlotte Higgins

Published: 06:00 Friday, 08 February 2019

Stonehenge, with the possible exception of Big Ben, is Britain’s most recognisable monument. As a symbol of the nation’s antiquity, it is our Parthenon, our pyramids – although, admittedly, less impressive. Neil MacGregor, the former director of the British Museum, recalls that when he took a group of Egyptian archaeologists to see it, they were baffled by our national devotion to the stones, which, compared to the refined surfaces of the pyramids, seemed to them like something hastily thrown up over a weekend.

More: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/feb/08/the-battle-for-the-future-of-stonehenge?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Boyne Valley Complex

Parts of a longboat found by River Boyne anglers are 5,000 years old


Story here:
https://jrnl.ie/4356455

Stonehenge (Circle henge)

Bones found at Stonehenge belonged to people from Wales


Tests show 5,000-year-old remains found at the world heritage site came from more than 100 miles away in west Wales

Maev Kennedy

The bones of people buried at Stonehenge, who died and were cremated about 5,000 years ago, have given up their secrets: like the bluestones, which form part of the famous prehistoric monument, they came from west Wales, near the Preseli Hills where the stones were quarried.

The remains of at least 10 of 25 individuals, whose brittle charred bones were buried at the monument, showed that they did not spend their lives on the Wessex chalk downland, but came from more than 100 miles away. Examination of the remains showed they were consistent with a region that includes west Wales, the most likely origin of at least some of these people.

Although the team, led by scientists from the University of Oxford with colleagues in Paris and Brussels, cannot prove that the remains are of people who actually built the monument, the earliest cremation dates are described as “tantalisingly” close to the date when the bluestones were brought into the earlier ditch and bank monument to form the first stone circle.

More:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/aug/02/revealed-stonehenge-buried-welsh?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Dowth

‘The find of a lifetime': Megalithic passage tomb dating back 5,500 years found in Co Meath


To date, two burial chambers have been discovered within the western part of the main passage.

A MEGALITHIC PASSAGE tomb cemetery dating back some 5,500 years has been unearthed beside Dowth Hall in Co Meath.

The discovery is within the Brú na Bóinne heritage site. The excavation is being carried out by agri-technology company Devenish in partnership with UCD’s School of Archaeology.

More: http://www.thejournal.ie/megalithic-passage-tomb-meath-4130419-Jul2018/

Boyne Valley Complex

Recent drought led to archaeological discovery of circular enclosure near Newgrange


Anthony Murphy, founder of Mythical Ireland, made the discovery when flying drones in the Brú na Bóinne area yesterday evening.

A LARGE CIRCULAR enclosure, or henge, has been revealed near the UNESCO World Heritage Site close to Newgrange in Co Meath.

Anthony Murphy, founder of Mythical Ireland, made the discovery when flying drones in the Brú na Bóinne area yesterday evening with photographer Ken Williams.

More: http://www.thejournal.ie/newgrange-mythical-ireland-4123238-Jul2018/

County Donegal

Locals unearth 'significant' prehistoric hoard of gold bands in Donegal


Experts from the National Museum have begun an investigation into the exciting discovery of four prehistoric gold arm bands they believe date back to the Bronze Age.

The amazingly intact ornaments were found buried together several feet underground at an undisclosed location in Co Donegal earlier this week.
Maeve Sikora, keeper of Irish antiquities at the National Museum of Ireland, credited local Donegal residents for finding the treasures and immediately reporting them to officials at the Donegal County Museum, who in turn alerted them to the find yesterday.

"These people were so helpful and quick to report it," she said.

More:
https://m.independent.ie/irish-news/locals-unearth-significant-prehistoric-hoard-of-gold-bands-in-donegal-37058447.html
Showing 1-20 of 55 news posts. Most recent first | Next 20
Taxi-driving, graphic artist with a penchant for high hills and low boulders. Currently residing in Tallaght where I can escape to the wildernesses of Wicklow within 10 minutes.

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