The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

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Showing 1-20 of 45 news posts. Most recent first | Next 20

Beltany (Stone Circle)

Shocking vandalism at ancient Beltany monument


More: https://www.donegaldaily.com/2019/05/03/shocking-vandalism-at-ancient-beltany-monument/?fbclid=IwAR0QpJ2STQLHWGL1YpUbRnQtL1j6k8zXqCLtjREFVAGDz31Ggn8LZjh3Kp0

Stonehenge (Stone Circle)

Stonehenge: DNA reveals origin of builders


The ancestors of the people who built Stonehenge travelled west across the Mediterranean before reaching Britain, a study has shown.

Researchers in London compared DNA extracted from Neolithic human remains found in Britain with that of people alive at the same time in Europe.

The Neolithic inhabitants appear to have travelled from Anatolia (modern Turkey) to Iberia before winding their way north.

They reached Britain in about 4,000BC.

Details have been published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.

The migration to Britain was just one part of a general, massive expansion of people out of Anatolia in 6,000BC that introduced farming to Europe.

Before that, Europe was populated by small, travelling groups which hunted animals and gathered wild plants and shellfish.

One group of early farmers followed the river Danube up into Central Europe, but another group travelled west across the Mediterranean.

DNA reveals that Neolithic Britons were largely descended from groups who took the Mediterranean route, either hugging the coast or hopping from island-to-island on boats.

More: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47938188?fbclid=IwAR1Q99kEGMVgXbR2B3qDJcl02Hoocwi5z7uSXw1_OSpeb1ZYpqGrUB98aKc

County Limerick

NMI recovers Bronze Age axe illegally detected in Adare


A miniature Bronze Age axe head was handed over to the National Museum of Ireland after pictures emerged of it on social media.

The axe was discovered through illegal metal detecting in Adare, Co Limerick.

NMI Keeper of Irish Antiquities Maeve Sikora said a member of the public alerted the museum to the images and the axe was recovered following an investigation by gardaí.

More: https://www.rte.ie/news/ireland/2019/0408/1041305-bronze-age-axe-find/

La Hougue de Vinde

Mystery digger ruins 5,000-year-old dolmen


La Hougue de Vinde dolmen near Noirmont has been seriously damaged after someone dug holes all over the 5,000 year old historical site.

A man was seen illegally using a metal detector and a trowel on the ancient site, prompting the island’s heritage organisations to appeal to the public to help protect them.

After an islander reported the incident, Olga Finch, Jersey Heritage’s Curator ofArchaeology, inspected the site. She confirmed that it had been seriously damaged, finding 'backfilled' metal detecting holes in the centre of the chamber, and targeted digging all over the dolmen, particularly in the earthen banks and at the base of the orthostats (upright stones).

More: https://www.bailiwickexpress.com/jsy/news/5000-year-old-dolmen-seriously-damage/?fbclid=IwAR0s4vziAhnZCYVZKJRwR6JIayfx90b4CuOg2mLUEYsegamACx1iajNLAFQ#.XIxalIXeyFr

Stonehenge and its Environs

The battle for the future of Stonehenge


Britain’s favourite monument is stuck in the middle of a bad-tempered row over road traffic. By Charlotte Higgins

Published: 06:00 Friday, 08 February 2019

Stonehenge, with the possible exception of Big Ben, is Britain’s most recognisable monument. As a symbol of the nation’s antiquity, it is our Parthenon, our pyramids – although, admittedly, less impressive. Neil MacGregor, the former director of the British Museum, recalls that when he took a group of Egyptian archaeologists to see it, they were baffled by our national devotion to the stones, which, compared to the refined surfaces of the pyramids, seemed to them like something hastily thrown up over a weekend.

More: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/feb/08/the-battle-for-the-future-of-stonehenge?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Boyne Valley Complex

Parts of a longboat found by River Boyne anglers are 5,000 years old


Story here:
https://jrnl.ie/4356455

Stonehenge (Stone Circle)

Bones found at Stonehenge belonged to people from Wales


Tests show 5,000-year-old remains found at the world heritage site came from more than 100 miles away in west Wales

Maev Kennedy

The bones of people buried at Stonehenge, who died and were cremated about 5,000 years ago, have given up their secrets: like the bluestones, which form part of the famous prehistoric monument, they came from west Wales, near the Preseli Hills where the stones were quarried.

The remains of at least 10 of 25 individuals, whose brittle charred bones were buried at the monument, showed that they did not spend their lives on the Wessex chalk downland, but came from more than 100 miles away. Examination of the remains showed they were consistent with a region that includes west Wales, the most likely origin of at least some of these people.

Although the team, led by scientists from the University of Oxford with colleagues in Paris and Brussels, cannot prove that the remains are of people who actually built the monument, the earliest cremation dates are described as “tantalisingly” close to the date when the bluestones were brought into the earlier ditch and bank monument to form the first stone circle.

More:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/aug/02/revealed-stonehenge-buried-welsh?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Dowth

‘The find of a lifetime': Megalithic passage tomb dating back 5,500 years found in Co Meath


To date, two burial chambers have been discovered within the western part of the main passage.

A MEGALITHIC PASSAGE tomb cemetery dating back some 5,500 years has been unearthed beside Dowth Hall in Co Meath.

The discovery is within the Brú na Bóinne heritage site. The excavation is being carried out by agri-technology company Devenish in partnership with UCD’s School of Archaeology.

More: http://www.thejournal.ie/megalithic-passage-tomb-meath-4130419-Jul2018/

Boyne Valley Complex

Recent drought led to archaeological discovery of circular enclosure near Newgrange


Anthony Murphy, founder of Mythical Ireland, made the discovery when flying drones in the Brú na Bóinne area yesterday evening.

A LARGE CIRCULAR enclosure, or henge, has been revealed near the UNESCO World Heritage Site close to Newgrange in Co Meath.

Anthony Murphy, founder of Mythical Ireland, made the discovery when flying drones in the Brú na Bóinne area yesterday evening with photographer Ken Williams.

More: http://www.thejournal.ie/newgrange-mythical-ireland-4123238-Jul2018/

County Donegal

Locals unearth 'significant' prehistoric hoard of gold bands in Donegal


Experts from the National Museum have begun an investigation into the exciting discovery of four prehistoric gold arm bands they believe date back to the Bronze Age.

The amazingly intact ornaments were found buried together several feet underground at an undisclosed location in Co Donegal earlier this week.
Maeve Sikora, keeper of Irish antiquities at the National Museum of Ireland, credited local Donegal residents for finding the treasures and immediately reporting them to officials at the Donegal County Museum, who in turn alerted them to the find yesterday.

"These people were so helpful and quick to report it," she said.

More:
https://m.independent.ie/irish-news/locals-unearth-significant-prehistoric-hoard-of-gold-bands-in-donegal-37058447.html

Dunbeg (Cliff Fort)

'We cannot stress how dangerous it is': Ancient Kerry fort closed after storm damage


More serious problems at Dunbeg.

Full story:
http://www.thejournal.ie/kerry-fort-ancient-3781702-Jan2018/

News

How Neolithic farming sowed the seeds of modern inequality 10,000 years ago


The prehistoric shift towards cultivation began our preoccupation with hierarchy and growth – and even changed how we perceive the passage of time

More:
https://www.theguardian.com/inequality/2017/dec/05/how-neolithic-farming-sowed-the-seeds-of-modern-inequality-10000-years-ago

County Down

Save Knock Iveagh!


We all want to believe that the places and heritage we love will be protected by somebody else for our children to enjoy. Some really important places in the UK benefit from protection by law and are supposed to be kept safe by our government bodies for the benefit of everyone. One such place is the ancient Neolithic burial site on the hill at Knock Iveagh. Although the burial site (cairn) is older than the pyramids and should be treated as a gem in the crown of beautiful Co Down, right now unfortunately it looks like somebody has dropped the ball because it is under terrible threat. Our public bodies have the power to save the hill and it is up to us to make sure they do so. That is why we are asking for your contribution to this important fight. Legal advice costs money, but this is a fight we can and must win.

https://www.gofundme.com/saveknockiveagh

County Kerry

Danny Healy-Rae and the Little People: Fairies to blame for problems on bad road, says TD


It was a puzzling case of Danny Healy-Rae and the 'little people'.
The Kerry TD is blaming poor road conditions around Killarney on fairies, according to his daughter.

Mr Healy-Rae believes that mythical creatures are at work on the main route between Killarney and Cork and that they are responsible for the appalling condition of the road.

More
http://m.independent.ie/irish-news/danny-healyrae-and-the-little-people-fairies-to-blame-for-problems-on-bad-road-says-td-36009894.html

County Westmeath

Illegal metal detectors damage 3,000-year-old wooden road


Illegal metal detectors have caused irreparable damage to a prehistoric road in the Midlands with Ireland's leading heritage charity calling on the Government to intervene to save the road.

An Taisce: The National Trust for Ireland has written to the Heritage Minister Heather Humphreys to request that the oakwood-built roadway, located on Mayne Bog in Coole, Co. Westmeath, be protected fully by the laws of the State.

Its Antiquities and Monuments committee has criticised the Minister for "standing idly by" and wants a licensed metal detector survey carried out along the route.

Dr Mark Clinton of An Taisce said that the area is of international importance and should be placed on the Record of Monuments and Places (RMP) list. Much of the 647-metre, 3,000-year-old wooden track has been dug up by workmen cutting peat.

More: http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/illegal-metal-detectors-damage-3000yearold-wooden-road-35780708.html

Spain (Country)

Spanish archaeologists discover cave art to rival country's best


Paleolithic-era drawings found in Axturra cave are in ‘Champions League’ of cave art sites, team leader says

Spanish archaeologists say they have discovered an exceptional set of Paleolithic-era cave drawings that could rank among the best in a country that already boasts some of the world’s most important cave art.

Chief site archaeologist Diego Garate said that an estimated 70 drawings were found on ledges 300m (1,000 ft) underground in the Atxurra cave in the northern Basque region. He described the site as being in “the Champions League” of cave art and among the top 10 sites in Europe. The engravings and paintings feature horses, buffalo, goats and deer, dating back 12,500-14,500 years.

More: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/may/27/spanish-archaeologists-discover-cave-art-axturra-paleolithic

Ceide Fields

Céide Fields may be 2,500 years younger than thought


NUI Galway archaeologist Andrew Whitefield disputes age of ancient north Mayo site.

More here: http://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/c%C3%A9ide-fields-may-be-2-500-years-younger-than-thought-1.2961569

Cissbury Ring (Hillfort)

Illegal treasure hunters damage ancient hill fort on South Downs


An ancient hill fort dubbed "one of the jewels in the crown" of the South Downs National Park has been damaged, police have said.

Illegal metal detecting is believed to be behind the disturbance to the ground at the 5,000-year-old Cissbury Ring site near Worthing in West Sussex.

More: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/11/25/illegal-treasure-hunters-damage-ancient-hill-fort-south-downs/

Monpelier (Hell Fire Club) (Passage Grave)

Megalithic Art Discovered at the Hellfire Club


Sitting partially exposed in the hollow of the strange mound behind the Hellfire Club, a dark lump of igneous rock served as a handy border to many bonfires over the centuries. However, those who enjoyed the warmth of the fire while lying up against the comfortably curved bank of the mound may not have realised that the mound they rested upon was the remains of an ancient tomb, and that plain looking dark stone was carved with symbols and designs that are over 5,000 years old.

The discovery of the artwork was the result of incredible serendipity. The surface of the stone has been damaged by fires and weathering, so the artwork is almost completely imperceptible to the naked eye. Had we dug our trenches anywhere else on site we would not have discovered it, and had we excavated during the summer, the higher flatter sunlight may not have revealed the faint trace of the artwork.

As the stone was sitting in a disturbed modern layer of material relating to picnics and parties, it was outside of its original context. We removed it quite early in the dig, though due to the many fires that had been lit upon it, it fractured into four large fragments as we began to lift it from the trench. As we did not originally notice anything particularly unusual about the stone, we (with some difficulty) lifted it out of the trench and set it on the side, so it would be close at hand for when we began to backfill the trenches.

More here: http://www.abartaheritage.ie/megalithic-art-discovered-at-the-hellfire-club/

Brittas (Portal Tomb)

Investigation into Brittas Bay dolmen damage


Damage to an ancient dolmen in Brittas Bay has been reported to the gardaí and the National Monument Service.

The megalithic tomb named the Castletimon Dolmen dates back close to 4,000 years and is a protected monument.

Part of the structure appears to have been knocked down, while stones and earth have been pulled away.

Steven Brennan of the Brittas Bay Tourism Association said the destruction of the Dolmen has caused widespread local anger.

'I was pretty shocked when I first saw the damage. People are very annoyed. It's a very historic area and needs to be treated with the respect it deserves.

'People are embarrassed by this incident. It's one of Wicklow's oldest human structures and is one of only four on the east coast of Ireland.'

The whole area is of significant historical importance with a number of standing stones, cairns, a fourth century Ogham stone and a recently newly discovered standing stone. There is also a sixth century monastery nearby which was second in importance only to Glendalough.

More:
http://www.independent.ie/regionals/wicklowpeople/news/investigation-into-brittas-bay-dolmen-damage-34563576.html
Showing 1-20 of 45 news posts. Most recent first | Next 20
Taxi-driving, graphic artist with a penchant for high hills and low boulders. Currently residing in Tallaght where I can escape to the wildernesses of Wicklow within 10 minutes.

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