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Cunard (Portal Tomb)

From Glenasmole Roads, by Patrick Healy, published by South Dublin Libraries (copyright 2006 Local Studies Section South Dublin Libraries)

The Shed Stone
The Dodder flows along the eastern boundary of the demesne where it is joined by a small stream coming down from the Featherbed Bog. On the northern bank of this stream, at a point 300 yards up from the Dodder, is a large rock raised up on three smaller ones, known locally as the Shed Stone and said to mark the position of buried treasure. (MacNeill and Dix. "Dolmen at Glenasmole", J.R.S.A.I. 1926, p. 122-123) Although this has the general appearance of a prehistoric dolmen or portal tomb, it is obvious on close examination that the supporting stones are actually three pieces of one stone which must have been split by the weight of the larger one above. These fragments are not placed to form a chamber or enclosure which is one of the chief characteristics of a prehistoric burial place. It would appear therefore that the unusual arrangement of these stones is entirely fortuitous. The height is about 4 feet.

Tuckmill Hill (Hillfort)

From archaeology.ie:

Description: Subcircular trivallate hilltop enclosure on a slight knoll on the lower NW spur of Baltinglass Hill with steep slopes to the W (overlooking the River Slaney) and gentler slopes to the N and E. The site is overlooked by 'Rathcoran' hillfort (WI027-026001-) c. 500m to the SE. The inner area (dims. c. 100m NW-SE; c. 75m NE-SW) is defined by an irregular stone bank, best preserved at the NE (Wth c. 4m), set along the perimeter of a largely natural scarp (H 0.5m). No indication of an entrance, external fosse or internal features. The middle rampart, composed of earth and stone (Wth c. 7m; H 1.7-2.5m) defines an area 170m NW-SE and 150m NE-SW and has an external fosse (Wth 3.5-5m; D 1m) and an outer bank (Wth 2m; H 1m), with a possible entrance (Wth 2m) at the N. The outermost rampart (Wth 6-7m; max. H 1m) (not shown on the 1907 OS 6-inch map) is also composed of earth and stone and is identifiable within the forestry on the E side and as a cropmark on the NW and S-SE sides (overall dims. c. 250m NW-SE; c. 250m NE-SW). (CUCAP, APA 45, AHK 55) (Price 1949, 143; OPW files)

The above description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Wicklow' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1997). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

Date of upload/revision: 17 December 2008

Date of last visit: 04 April 1989

Baltinglass Hill - Tombs (Passage Grave)

From archaeology.ie:

Description: Situated on the summit of Baltinglass Hill in the SE sector of Rathcoran hillfort (WI027-026001-). It was excavated in 1934-6 (Walshe 1941, 221-36) and was found to consist of a multiperiod kerbed cairn (diam. c. 27m) underneath which five structures were identified. The cairn material has been built up to form a massive protective wall around the monument (CUCAP, ASU 48). A kerb of large stones surrounded the cairn, and an inner kerb was revealed during excavation. Two stones of the inner kerb and one of the outer bear passage tomb art. The main tomb is on the N side of the cairn; a short passage (L 3.2m) within the cairn is roofed with slabs and leads to a chamber (diam. 2m) which contains three shallow recesses. It contains a stone basin with pecked ornament. On the S side of the cairn is another tomb comprising a chamber divided into three compartments; no evidence for a passage was found. Two of its stones bear passage tomb art. On the NW side of the cairn are the remains of a small corbelled structure, partly overlain by the inner kerb. Immediately SW of this was a small cist-like structure which is no longer visible. A fifth chamber stands inside the kerb to the E of the main tomb. The finds from the site include the cremations of at least three adults and one child, flint scrapers, Carrowkeel pottery, and bone pins. Finds from beneath the cairn included a stone axe, a flint javelin-head, scrapers, an egg-shaped stone, carbonised wheat grains and hazelnuts. A saddle quern was also found in the cairn material (Cooney 1981, 102-6). The site is referred to in the OS Name Books as a cave on the NE side of a large collection of stones. Another cairn lies 100m to the SW. (Walshe 1941, 221-36; Herity 1974, 259-60; Shee-Twohig 1981, 223)

The above description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Wicklow' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1997). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

Date of upload/revision: 17 December 2008

Date of last visit: 11 April 1989

Rathcoran Hillfort

From archaeology.ie:

Description: Large oval enclosure (max. dims. c. 400m NW-SE; c. 300m NE-SW; int. dims. 380m NW-SE; 270m NE-SW) defined by two ramparts, enclosing the summit of Baltinglass Hill with extensive views to the N, E and S and overlooking 'Rathnagree' hillfort (WI027-010----) c. 500m to the N. The ramparts are up to 16m in width, are best defined at the N and NW, and are largely composed of stone. The average distance between ramparts is 15m. There is no clear indication of an entrance. The interior rises towards the SE corner of the site, and there is a large amount of loose stone and many rock outcrops within the ramparts. At the summit there is a passage tomb (WI027-026003-) surrounded by a massive protective drystone wall (Wth 3m; H 2m) built with stones from the cairn which had covered the passage tomb. There are two possible hut sites in the interior (WI027-026002-, WI027-026004-), and a cairn (WI027-076----) outside the outer rampart on the SW side. (CUCAP, AYP 27-30; ASU 48) (Price 1934, 34)

The above description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Wicklow' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1997). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

Date of upload/revision: 23 October 2012

Keadeen Cursus

From archaeology.ie:

Description: Clearly visible on Bing Maps (http://binged.it/19yShg9) and to a lesser extent on the 2000 and 2005 OS ortho imagery (http://maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,695140,689805,6,0). A long rectangular enclosure (L c. 286m; Wth c. 34m) defined by banks and running in an ENE-WSW direction on a steep slope, with a cairn (WI027-044----) just outside the NE corner. The banks (avg. Wth 5m; H 0.3-0.6m) which are probably constructed from the mountainside scree, are almost entirely covered in heather and sod, but in one place the stone fabric of the bank is fully exposed. While the remains are insufficient to allow classification with certainty, interpretation as a possible cursus monument would not be inconsistent with the surviving evidence.

Compiled by: Chris Corlett and Claire Breen

Date of upload: 25 June 2013

Date of last visit: 13 June 2013

References:

Corlett, C. 2014 Some cursus monuments in South Leinster. Archaeology Ireland 28, (2), 20-25.

Castleruddery Lower (Enclosure)

From archaeology.ie:

Description: Situated at the base of an elongated natural hollow. Circular platform (diam. 44m; H 2-2.5m) with a slightly dished summit (diam. 36m) defined by a partly natural, wide flat-bottomed 'fosse'. No indication of a bank, entrance or internal features.

The above description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Wicklow' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1997). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

Date of upload/revision: 17 December 2008

Date of last visit: 25 May 1989

Claremont (Artificial Mound)

From archaeology.ie:

Description: Situated in the grounds of the Poor Clare convent (formerly Claremont Institution). Comprises a round-topped mound with steep sides (H 4m; diam. 15m). Views from the top are of an extensive low-lying plain, which today is occupied by housing estates. Overgrown with thorns and sycamores. The W and NW sides have been damaged.
Compiled by: Geraldine Stout

Date of upload: 26 August 2011

Date of last visit: 08 June 1994

Kilbeg standing stone (Standing Stone / Menhir)

From aracheology.ie:

Description: On a N-Facing slope of Black Hill. A granite standing stone (max dims. Wth 1.45m; H 1.6m; T 0.7m), with a long axis of NNW-SSE, tapers to form a point at the top (T 0.28m).

Compiled by: Matt Kelleher

Date of upload: 17 December 2012

Blessington Demesne 2 (Round Barrow(s))

From archaeology.ie:

Description: On gently undulating terrain in the landscaped demesne of Damshire House. Circular mound with external annular ditch (max. ext. diam. c. 14m). No visible surface remains. Visible on aerial photograph (G.S.I. O 73/N 332/333 (1973)).

Compiled by: Matt Kelleher

Date of upload: 04 December 2012

References:

Molloy, B. 2004 Blessington Demesne. In I. Bennett (Ed.) Excavations 2002: summary accounts of archaeological excavations in Ireland, 532 (No. 1958). Bray. Wordwell.

Date of last visit: 23 May 1989

Blessington Demesne 1 (Round Barrow(s))

From archaeology.ie:

Description: On a slight rise in gently undulating terrain with higher ground to the NW. Circular mound (diam. 11.1m; H. 1m) with an external annular ditch (Wth 1.5m; D. 0.45m).

Compiled by: Matt Kelleher

Date of upload: 04 December 2012

Date of last visit: 16 May 1989

Newtown Park (Round Barrow(s))

From archaeology.ie:

Description: Prominently located (OD c. 296m) at the NE end of a narrow-topped, moderately steep-sided NE-SW ridge, overlooking Glen Ding valley to the NE and with panoramic views in all directions except SW. A sub-circular area (diam. 14.4m E-W; 13.4m N-S) is defined by a shallow fosse (D 0.2-0.4m: base Wth 0.8m at N – 3.5m at E) and by a low, heavily poached outer earthen bank (int. H 0.2-0.6m; Wth 2.5m at S – 4.1m at W; ext. H 0.3-0.5m) which has a spine of dense stony material, and possible small inner revetting stones at S (ext. diam. 29m E-W; 27.5m N-S). An entrance gap (Wth 3.3m) at ESE is flanked on its S side by a single revetting stone on the inner face of the bank.

Compiled by: Gearóid Conroy

Date of upload: 23 July 2012

Date of last visit: 02 November 2000

Gernonstown (Artificial Mound)

From archaeology.ie:

Description: The following description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Meath' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1987). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.
Date of upload/revision: 10 July 2007

Fairly flat-topped mound (diam. of base 37m, H 3m). No kerb or fosse visible.

Date of last visit: 28 May 1969

Loughane East (Standing Stone / Menhir)

From archaeology.ie:

Description: On flat patch of ground, in rolling pasture, on N side of Shournagh River basin. One stone remains, long axis NE-SW; it is 2.2m L, 0.65m T and 3m H; second stone, standing in 1934, stood c. 2.6m to SW (O Nualláin 1988, 245, no. 99). According to local information, second stone fell during storm on Christmas Eve 1966. Twelve stones found in 'immediate locality' of stone pair, 'some much larger, lying on the ground partly buried in the boggy soil of the place' (Caulfield 1866, 293). Local tradition that there were at least 7 stones in this field.

The above description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Cork. Volume 3: Mid Cork' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1997). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

Date of upload/revision: 14 January 2009

Date of last visit: 28 September 1982

Lios na Ratha/Loughane East

From archaeology.ie:

Description: In pasture, on SW-facing slope. Circular area (91.4m N-S; 90.4m E-W) enclosed by substantial earthen bank (int. H 3.4m) with external fosse (D 2.65m). Low earthen field boundary (H 0.4m) at outer edge of fosse, stone faced externally. Gap (Wth 3m) in bank to SSW. Second gap (Wth 4.8m) to E with causeway across fosse; sides of gap cut back by machinery, giving vertical sections through bank. Fosse waterlogged to E; according to Hartnett (1939, 288), spring in fosse to S of entrance (causewayed gap). Possible souterrain (CO062-135002-) in interior; interior ploughed c. 1984.

The above description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Cork. Volume 3: Mid Cork' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1997). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

Date of upload/revision: 14 January 2009

Date of last visit: 18 November 1993

Kilbeg Cairn (Cairn(s))

From archaeology.ie:

Description: Situated on the saddle between Sorrel Hill and Lugnagun, with extensive views to the S over the now flooded King's River valley. Small cairn (diam. c. 10m; H 0.4-0.6m) with traces of an internal structure, possibly a passage feature, at the SE side.

The above description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Wicklow' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1997). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

Date of upload/revision: 17 December 2008

Date of last visit: 31 May 1996

Kilbeg (Bullaun Stone)

From the SMR at archaeology.ie:

Description: Situated on a gentle NNW-facing slope above a steeper valley slope to the NW. Two bullaun stones- (1) Large flat-topped earthfast boulder (dims. 2.55m x 1.30m; T 0.47m) with six basins in the upper surface [WI010-012----]. (2) The other stone (dims 0.8m x 0.75m), situated 19m to the NE, has a single basin [WI010-012001-].

The above description is derived from the published 'Archaeological Inventory of County Wicklow' (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1997). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

Crehelp (Standing Stone / Menhir)

Taken from the NMR:

Description: Listed as a 'standing stone' in the SMR (1986) and as a possible 'children's burial ground' in the RMP (1995). A roughly dressed granite pillar (H 1.77m; 0.27m x 0.26m), pierced by a rectangular slot (H 0.23m; Wth 0.11m) through the E and W faces c. 52cm from the top, reputedly marks the grave of Prince Aralt (Harold) one of the Danish chieftains killed in the Battle of Glenmama. It is also believed that the corner of the field in which the stone now stands was formerly a burial ground. (Walshe 1931, 135)

Compiled by: Matt Kelleher

Date of upload: 19 December 2012

Date of last visit: 20 July 1989

Goldenhill (Rath)

Liam Price visited here on 29 September 1929

"There is a rath about 20 or 25yds in diameter just N of the top point of Goldenhill. Almost due E, just outside the entrance are six large boulders, suggesting a passageway by their appearances. There seems to be the remains of a chamber or cist in the centre of the rath – and the surface inside is not even, but consists of a large wide pit 5 or 6ft deep in the centre (containing the stones of the chamber) with six smaller pits of the same depth irregularly placed around – the surface now all grass- and bracken-grown."

He returned on 11 October 1944 (and had second thoughts)

"Raheen at Goldenhill, Kilbride. I examined this again and noted more details. It has an outer fosse and an inner bank: I saw no trace of an outer bank. Depth of fosse below level of field, only about 1ft, width of fosse 9 paces or yards, height of inner bank over fosse about 7ft: fairly even all round.

Six blocks at entrance, the outer two are near the outside edge of the fosse – 9ft apart, one 3ft high by 3ft across (S side), the other 6ft high by 5ft across (N side). The other four are on the outer slope of the gap or entrance through the bank, 9 to 10ft apart, and each about 3ft high – the lower one on the S side has been cut through with wedges, and the broken-off piece is lying there.



Diameter of enclosed space of raheen, about 25 paces. It is very uneven, so that it is impossible to pace it across. Going in through the entrance, on the left is a round pit 5 or 6ft deep and 10ft or so across – and there are two somewhat smaller pits close inside the bank further to the SE and S. Between the first and second, and going in a crooked line across to the W or NW side is a long depression: and across this from the entrance, on the west side is another hollow, and it is in this one that the stones are which I thought in 1929 were the stones of a chamber. This pit is not in the centre, but W of the centre. The stone which looked to me like a capstone is about 3ft wide, mostly buried in the grass – and there are other stones under and near it. I now think that these might be stones forming part of a ruined hut (door?). The other pits might also be the ruins of huts. [In 1929] I spoke of six smaller pits, but three I have mentioned here are the best preserved, as round pits.

The inside of the raheen would I think be higher than the level of the field outside, even allowing for a buried accumulation of stones. All the stones and block are of granite.

The Liam Price Notebooks – The placenames, antiquities and topography of County Wicklow
Edited by Christiaan Corlett and Mairéad Weaver
2002 Dúchas, The Heritage Service

Arch. Inventory of Co. Wicklow says:

Description: Situated on a very gentle SW-facing slope c. 200m SW of the summit of Golden Hill. Circular area (diam. 37m) defined by a stony bank (Wth c. 4m; int. H 0.7m) and an external fosse (av. Wth 6m; av. D 0.7m). There is a gap in the bank (Wth 5m) and causeway across the fosse (Wth 6m) at the NE with another causeway (Wth c. 12m) at the SE. There are some large stones in situ in the interior of the site and traces of a boulder revetment at the base of the bank. Possibly a modified prehistoric kerbed cairn. (Price 1934, 46)

Herity has this in his inventory of Irish passage graves, listed as Wi 1.

"At a height of 274m (900') stands a ruined circular structure 36m in diameter and 4.5m high. There appear to be upright kerbstones around the edge and a pair of matched stones in the north-east quadrant. two other tumuli stand close by, one in Goldenhill Td. (Sheet 5) and the other in Kilbride Td. (Sheet1)"
[Mr. P. Healy]

From Irish Passage Graves: Neolithic Tomb-Builders in Ireland and Britain 2500 B.C.
by Michael Herity
1974 Irish University Press
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Taxi-driving, graphic artist with a penchant for high hills and low boulders. Currently residing in Tallaght where I can escape to the wildernesses of Wicklow within 10 minutes.

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