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Stanton Moor North (Stone Circle) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Stanton Moor North</b>Posted by thesweetcheat

Gorse Stone (Natural Rock Feature) — Images

<b>Gorse Stone</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Gorse Stone</b>Posted by thesweetcheat

Withington Woods West (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Withington Woods West</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Withington Woods West</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Withington Woods West</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Withington Woods West</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Withington Woods West</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Withington Woods West</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Withington Woods West</b>Posted by thesweetcheat

Withington Woods West (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

Visited 30 August 2020 after leaving Withington long barrow. I thought this one might be harder to find in August vegetation, but it proves to be easy. It's visible next to one of the main paths running through the woods, prominent above the immediate surroundings and sporting a fine crown of ferns.

It's pretty big and appears to be well-preserved, although the vegetation makes it difficult to properly see the extent of the mound. On its top, beneath the ferns and brambles, it appears to be constructed of limestone rather than being an earthen mound.

One word of warning - even in pleasant summer weather, the tracks through the woods are very muddy. I pass a couple who have come to pick blackberries, and white trainers maybe weren't the ideal footwear.

From here I head northwest to seek out the multiple banks of a cross-dyke shown on the OS map. It proves to be a very reduced monument, struggling to be seen above calf-height undergrowth. Still, it's a pretty spot and I stop for lunch.

I leave the woods to the northeast and drop down to the pretty villlage Withington, where the cool interior of the church is open for visitors, the first I've been inside this year. From there it's an easy stroll back to Colesbourne and the bus home. The monuments in Withington Woods aren't of the first rank, but in this strange summer of limited travel and adventures close to home, I'm delighted to have visited some new-to-me sites in such a lovely woodland setting.

Withington Long Barrow — Images

<b>Withington Long Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Withington Long Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Withington Long Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Withington Long Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Withington Long Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Withington Long Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat

Withington Long Barrow — Fieldnotes

Of the four new-to-me Gloucestershire long barrows I visited during the post-lockdown summer months, Withington is both the best preserved and potentially the least easy to get to. Visited 30 August 2020.

I start from Colesbourne down in the picturesque Churn valley, a nice summer Sunday stroll along a quiet lane heading east then north up onto the high ground of the west Cotswolds. A bridleway from Hill Barn provides somewhat muddy access to Withington Woods. I get the feeling that this woodland is a 'country pursuits' kind of place, as various quad-biking lads wearing gillets and farming gear pass me en route and the distant crump of shotguns, a Cotswolds staple, breaks the peace.

Once in the woods I'm foolishly confident of choosing the right forestry track from a selection, but not sure how overgrown the barrow might be at the tail end of August. In any event, I end up going round in a circle, as the barrow isn't apparent on my initial pass of the area where I think it is. Second time around, I realise that I missed it because it's actually inside a high-fenced pheasant or partridge enclosure. Luckily the gate into the enclosure isn't locked, otherwise there would be no way of getting to the barrow.

The barrow is actually much better than I'd expected, a fine upstanding mound covered in pieces of limestone under a sparse covering of shrubby bushes and less undergrowth than I envisaged. I find no sign of the chamber referred to in Chance's miscellaneous notes but it's still an impressive monument.

Despite the nice woodland setting, the barrow isn't a particularly inviting place to hang around, as being effectively enclosed by 7 foot high wire mesh with only one way in or out kind of kills the atmosphere. Still, it's really pleasing to find a decent monument here, the main threat to which seems to be tree roots and some light animal burrowing in the flanks.

Having escaped the wire, I head northwest along a broad track to seek out Withington West round barrow.

Norbury Camp (Upper Coberley) (Hillfort) — Images

<b>Norbury Camp (Upper Coberley)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Norbury Camp (Upper Coberley)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Norbury Camp (Upper Coberley)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Norbury Camp (Upper Coberley)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Norbury Camp (Upper Coberley)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Norbury Camp (Upper Coberley)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Norbury Camp (Upper Coberley)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Norbury Camp (Upper Coberley)</b>Posted by thesweetcheat

Cotswold Park (Long Barrow) — Images

<b>Cotswold Park</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Cotswold Park</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Cotswold Park</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Cotswold Park</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Cotswold Park</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Cotswold Park</b>Posted by thesweetcheat

Cotswold Park (Long Barrow) — Fieldnotes

After leaving Woodmancote round barrow I head to the little village of the same name, from where a bridleway heads westwards. The landscape ahead is open and I can see the next site of the day as a lighter patch in a field across the dry valley dropping away on my left.

The path enters a little wood and turns right, and here a field gate allows access into the fields adjacent to the long barrow. Skirting around the top of the valley, the barrow's field is margined with bright blue cornflowers, but the barrow itself is crowned only with long grasses.

It's clearly been ploughed over the centuries, as it's quite reduced in height. It's nevertheless a good length and has enough left of its mound to be obvious. Now unploughed, it's a nice place to sit for a while, as banks of cloud rush over. The crest of the hill blocks views to the west, hedges to the north, but to the southeast I can just make out the distant edge of the Marlborough Downs in Wiltshire.

From here I rejoin the bridleway to Cotswold Park and then up onto prominent Pen Hill to the north. Making my way up to the clump of trees on the top, the clouds that have been building all morning finally decide to drop their load on me, a temporary blip on an otherwise hot and sunny day. After a lunch stop by the trig, I drop down to Colesbourne and munch on a ice-cream before deciding on an impromptu revisit to Norbury hillfort and a long walk back to Cheltenham.

Woodmancote (Round Barrow(s)) — Fieldnotes

An easy stroll up from the bus stop at Rendcomb on a warm August day, the sun playing hide and seek behind billows of Cotswolds clouds.

The tree-covered barrow is prominent in a field next to the minor road east of Woodmancote. It's at the top of steeper slopes dropping down to the picturesque River Churn, hidden by woodland from the barrow itself. There are neither crops nor livestock on my visit.

The trees make the barrow an obvious landmark and appear to have saved it from the plough, although the mound extends outwards into the field from the wooden fence surrounding the trees. The drawback with my summer visit is that the trees conceal the barrow beneath a deep covering of nettles, which also guard the site with a knee-high barrier. Clad in shorts, I make a half-hearted foray but am quickly stung in multiple places and retreat from closer inspection.

Vegetation aside, it's heartening to find a Cotswold round barrow that hasn't been ploughed down to nothing. The situation is pleasant, but the lack of longer views and the proximity of houses on the edge of the village stops it from really being a place to spend very much time. Worth the visit though, especially as I haven't been here before.

I head off to Woodmancote itself, then on to Cotswold Park long barrow. A good start to the day.

Woodmancote (Round Barrow(s)) — Images

<b>Woodmancote</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Woodmancote</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Woodmancote</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Woodmancote</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Woodmancote</b>Posted by thesweetcheat

Wood Barrow (Long Barrow) — Miscellaneous

As well as the long barrow, there is a round barrow across the road in the field to the north, apparently known as Royal Oak Field.

Summary of Pastscape details:
A round barrow situated at SP 06701239 upon the gentle north-facing slope of a ridge. The barrow measures in diameter 29.0m north-south by 26.0m transversely, with a maximum height of 1.0m. There are no visible remains of a ditch; under plough.

Two upright slabs seen in 1936 after ploughing are no longer visible.

The Bronze Age barrow is not clearly visible on the available aerial photographs, although a lighter coloured area, which is probably caused by a spread of the stone material that formed the mound, is visible in 1946.

Wood Barrow (Long Barrow) — Images

<b>Wood Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wood Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wood Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wood Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wood Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Wood Barrow</b>Posted by thesweetcheat

Pinkwell (Long Barrow) — Images

<b>Pinkwell</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Pinkwell</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Pinkwell</b>Posted by thesweetcheat<b>Pinkwell</b>Posted by thesweetcheat
Showing 1-50 of 13,668 posts. Most recent first | Next 50
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