The Modern Antiquarian. Stone Circles, Ancient Sites, Neolithic Monuments, Ancient Monuments, Prehistoric Sites, Megalithic MysteriesThe Modern Antiquarian

 

Morbihan (56) including Carnac

Departement

<b>Morbihan (56) including Carnac</b>Posted by Spaceship markImage © Mark Williamson
Carnac sites
These are listed under their individual names. There are so many sites in and around Carnac that there is no clear line between which sites are in Carnac and those outside Carnac.
See individual sites for details

Added by TMA Ed

Show  |  Hide
Web searches for Morbihan (56) including Carnac

Sites/Regions:

23 posts
Alignements de Kerlescan Alignement
33 posts
Alignements de Kermario Alignement
43 posts
Alignements de Kerzerho Alignement
19 posts
Alignements de Ménec Alignement
15 posts
Alignements de Moulin de St Pierre Alignement
12 posts
Alignements de Petit-Ménec Alignement
18 posts
Alignements de St Barbe Alignement
11 posts
Alignements de Vieux Moulin Alignement
4 posts
Allee Couverte du Grand-Village Allee-Couverte
9 posts
Bot er Mohed Allee-Couverte
7 posts
Bronzo Standing Stone / Menhir
8 posts
Coët-er-Bei Alignement
6 posts
Cromlech de Crucuny Cromlech (France and Brittany)
14 posts
Cromlech de Kerbourgnec Cromlech (France and Brittany)
1 post
Cromlech de Kerlescan Nord Cromlech (France and Brittany)
3 posts
Cromlech de Kerlescan Ouest Cromlech (France and Brittany)
13 posts
Cromlech de Ménec Cromlech (France and Brittany)
11 posts
Crucuno Rectangle Cromlech (France and Brittany)
2 posts
Dolmens Des Grays Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
10 posts
Dolmens de Kerhuen Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
10 posts
Dolmens de Kerran Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
44 posts
Dolmens de Mane Kerioned Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
11 posts
Dolmens de Parc Gueren Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
1 post
Dolmens de Quéric la Lande Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
31 posts
Dolmens de Rondossec Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
3 posts
Dolmen des Sept Saints Allee-Couverte
9 posts
Dolmen de Beaumer Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
1 post
Dolmen de Botlann Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
22 posts
Dolmen de Crucuno Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
11 posts
Dolmen de Kercadoret Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
1 post
Dolmen de Kerclément Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
19 posts
Dolmen de Kergavat Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
6 posts
Dolmen de Kerguerhen Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
1 post
Dolmen de Kerlescan Passage Grave
8 posts
Dolmen de Kerluir Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
2 posts
Dolmen de Kerlutu Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
8 posts
Dolmen de Kermané Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
13 posts
Dolmen de Kermario Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
2 posts
Dolmen de Kermarquer Burial Chamber
2 posts
Dolmen de Kerroc'h Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
1 post
Dolmen de Kervehennec Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
Dolmen de Kluder-Yer Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
2 posts
Dolmen de la Madeleine Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
Dolmen de Mané-Brisil Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
17 posts
Dolmen de Mané Croc'h Chambered Tomb
Dolmen de Mané Rohr Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
Dolmen de Nauterio Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
14 posts
Dolmen de Roh-an-Aod Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
5 posts
Dolmen de Runesto Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
2 posts
Dolmen de Toulvern Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
9 posts
Dolmen du Cosquer Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
4 posts
Dolmen Du Crapaud Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
4 posts
Dolmen du Cruz Moquen Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
3 posts
Dolmen du Roh-Du Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
14 posts
Er-Grah Cairn(s)
1 post
Er-Roc'h-Feutet Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
12 posts
Er Lannic Cromlech (France and Brittany)
8 posts
Géant du Manio Standing Stone / Menhir
15 posts
Gavr'inis Chambered Cairn
18 posts
Grand Menhir Brise Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Kergonfalz Allee-Couverte
5 posts
Kerlud Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
17 posts
Larcuste cairns Chambered Cairn
13 posts
La Loge Aux Loups Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
11 posts
Les Pierres Droites de Monteneuf Alignement
34 posts
Les Pierres Plats Allée-Coudée
8 posts
Les Trois Menhirs du Champ Alignement
7 posts
Luffang Allée-Coudée
14 posts
Mane-Er-Hrouek Tumulus (France and Brittany)
1 post
Mané Bogad Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
31 posts
Mané Braz Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
31 posts
Mané Keriavel Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
22 posts
Mane Lud Tumulus (France and Brittany)
7 posts
Mané Roularde Allee-Couverte
26 posts
Mané Rutuel Passage Grave
4 posts
Menhirs Beg-er-Goalennec Standing Stones
5 posts
Menhirs de Kerjean Alignement
4 posts
Menhirs de Mané-Meur Standing Stones
Menhir de Crifol Standing Stone / Menhir
Menhir de Kerlagade Standing Stone / Menhir
Menhir de Kerlagade Standing Stone / Menhir
9 posts
Menhir de Kerluir Standing Stone / Menhir
7 posts
Le Petit Mont Chambered Cairn
17 posts
Quadrilataire de Manio Tertre Tumulaire
25 posts
Table des Marchants Chambered Cairn
1 post
Tertre Tumulaire de Kermario Tertre Tumulaire
11 posts
Tumulus de Crucuny Tumulus (France and Brittany)
21 posts
Tumulus de Kercado Tumulus (France and Brittany)
22 posts
Tumulus de Rocher Tumulus (France and Brittany)
13 posts
Tumulus de St Michel Tumulus (France and Brittany)
17 posts
Tumulus du Moustoir Tumulus (France and Brittany)
Sites of disputed antiquity:
3 posts
Dolmen et Menhir de Carnac-Plage Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech

Images (click to view fullsize)

Add an image Add an image
Photographs:<b>Morbihan (56) including Carnac</b>Posted by Spaceship mark <b>Morbihan (56) including Carnac</b>Posted by Spaceship mark Maps / Plans / Diagrams:<b>Morbihan (56) including Carnac</b>Posted by fitzcoraldo Artistic / Interpretive:<b>Morbihan (56) including Carnac</b>Posted by Chance

Folklore

Add folklore Add folklore
St. Cornely was Pope at Rome, from whence he was hunted by Pagan soldiers who pursued him. He fled before them, accompanied by a yoke of oxen, which bore his baggage and on which he mounted when weary. One evening he arrived on the outskirts of a village called Le Moustoir where he wished to stop; having, however, heard a young girl insulting her mother he continued on his way and arrived shortly at the foot of a mountain where there was another small village. He then saw the sea in front of him and immediately behind him soldiers in battle array. He stopped and transformed the whole army into stones. As a souvenir of this great miracle the inhabitants of the surrounding country erected on the spot where he stopped a church dedicated to St. Cornely. That is the reason why these long lines of stones standing to the north of the village of Carnac are seen, and why so often at night ghosts are observed walking in the alleys called 'Soudardet sans Cornely' or 'Soldats de St. Cornely'. Pilgrims from all countries flocked to the place to implore St. Cornely to cure their diseased cattle. He cured them all in remembrance of the great services rendered to him by his yoke of oxen during his flight.

The pilgrims, coming to the 'Pardon of St. Cornely', passed among the stone soldiers. The men were supposed to bring stones, the women earth, and to drop them on an elevation near to Carnac, where in time they formed the mount of St. Michel.
Le Rouzic then goes on to hint that perhaps the worship of St. Cornely actually replaced the original worship of the ox here. Hmm who knows.

From 'The Megalithic Monuments of Carnac and Locmariaquer' by Z Le Rouzic (trans. W. M. Tapp), 1908, which you can see in full on the Internet Archive.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
19th November 2009ce

In "Excavations at Carnac" by James Miln (1877) he describes some mounds (the 'bossenno' or Caesar's Camp) to the east of Carnac, which seem to be the ruins of Roman houses. Interestingly, from page 16...
It happened one day when I was absent during the dinner hour of my workmen, that an English lady and her son came to see the diggings. The latter amused himself in working with a pick about that part of the construction in the room No. 1 which resembled a chimney, where he discovered a polished stone celt of a white colour, which he showed to his mother: neither of them, however, was aware of its value, and it was flung aside amongst the debris to be carted away. It was not until the following day, when I happened to show them the polished stone celts in the museum in Carnac, that they informed me of their discovery, and regretted that they had not known better. Exertions were made to recover the lost axe, but without success.

The discovery of a stone axe in what appeared to be a chimney was all the more interesting from its crrelation with a custom still observed at Carnac, that of building into the chimney of the dwelling-house a stone celt which is supposed to preserve the house from being struck by lightning. It is to be noted also that the name of the stone axe or celt in the Breton language is Mein-Gurunn, that is to say, the Thunder Stone.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
19th August 2009ce

The legend of Carnac which explains these avenues of monoliths bears a resemblance to the Cornish story of 'the Hurlers,' who were turned into stone for playing at hurling on the Lord's Day, or to that other English example from Cumberland of 'Long Meg' and her daughters.

St Cornely, we are told, pursued by an army of pagans, fled toward the sea. Finding no boat at hand, and on the point of being taken, he transformed his pursuers into stones, the present monoliths.

The Saint had made his flight to the cost in a bullock-cart, and perhaps for this reason he is now regarded as the patron saint of cattle.
From 'Legends and Romances of Brittany' by Lewis Spence (1917?), which you can read on the Sacred Texts Archive.
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/lrb/index.htm
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
5th May 2008ce

I have been informed by a priest, but I know not how far it may be correct, that Carnac signifies literally, in the Breton language, a field of flesh. If this be the meaning of the word, it would lead one to conjecture that these stories were placed in memory of some great battle, or as memorials in a common cemetery of the dead.

The people here have a singular custom, whenever any of their cattle are diseased, of coming among these stones to pray to St. Cornelius for their recovery. Such a practice may be a remnant of pagan superstition continued in Christian times; but I must remark that St. Cornelius is the patron saint of the neighbouring church.

I cannot learn that the peasantry of this country have any traditions about Carnac; and I must here observe than no relations or accounts given either by the poor or more enlightened people of Brittany can be depended upon.

.. Tradition has given to the site of these stones the name of Caesar's Camp, but tradition in such a question is an insufficient guide. M. Cambry, led by another tradition, reported to him by an old sailor, that a stone was added every year, conjectures, though with hesitation, that the monument has some connexion with the astronomy of a remote age.
From 'The Penny Cyclopaedia' v6 by George Long (1836).
Digitized at Google Books, here:
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=ztqyJi7Ec9UC&pg=PA304
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
10th January 2008ce
Edited 10th January 2008ce

We pursued this [rough track] until the extreme ruggedness of the plain rendered further advance almost impossible.. I was [pleased] that my drive was at an end, and was not less pleased to find that no garrulous guides pounced on me when I alighted from the carriage.. I was happily alone; for Carnac is one of those places where solitude becomes a luxury, and consequently where guides would be more than usually vexatious and troublesome;

for what could they tell the visitor respecting the mysterious ranks of obelisks, the purposes of which have baffled speculative investigations and learned inquiries?

Nothing beyond the whimsical legend current among Bretons, that the stones of Carnac are the soldiers of a mighty army petrified by St. Cornely, who, being hard pressed by them, took the effectual method of frustrating their murderous purposes by turning them into stone.

The skeletons of the soldiers, adds the legend, may be seen on certain occasions at midnight, in the churchyard at Carnac, performing penance for the sins committed in the flesh against the saint, and listening reverently to sermons preached by Death himself.

If you are curious to know more, you will be shown the pulpit of the grim preacher, a dilapidated stone Calvary, and, if you have sufficient courage, you may even hear the sermon; though, if accounts be true, the penalty of intrusion, on being detected by the ghastly congregation, is far more severe than that with which Tam o' Shanter* was threatened.
p246 of Charles Richard Weld's "A vacation in Brittany' (1856) - now digitised at Google Books.

*of Robert Burns' poem.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
11th October 2007ce
Edited 11th October 2007ce

Links

Add a link Add a link

Alignements de Carnac


Drone footage
ryaner Posted by ryaner
3rd July 2016ce

List of megaliths of Morbihan


Detail listing of hundreds of sites
Chance Posted by Chance
6th March 2011ce

Carnac at france-for-visitors.com


Visitors guide to France in English for the Carnac area including map
Chance Posted by Chance
22nd July 2010ce

Carnac by car


An amateur's guide to visiting the Carnac stones by car by Graham and Angela
Chance Posted by Chance
22nd July 2010ce

The megalithic monuments of Carnac and Locmariaquer; their purpose and age


Small guide book to the site in English, by Zacharie Le Rouzic from 1908
Download the complete book in various formats including pdf and epub
Chance Posted by Chance
22nd July 2010ce

Annuaire-Mairie.fr


Offical listing for many of the monuments in the region. Contains early mono photos - English translation via Google.
Chance Posted by Chance
21st July 2010ce
Edited 21st July 2010ce

The Megaliths of Carnac


Another useful web listing of sites with pictures
Chance Posted by Chance
21st July 2010ce

Megaliths in the Carnac region of France


Some nice b&w photos.
Hob Posted by Hob
6th November 2008ce
Edited 7th November 2008ce

Latest posts for Morbihan (56) including Carnac

Showing 1-10 of 986 posts. Most recent first | Next 10

Les Pierres Plats (Allée-Coudée) — Fieldnotes

As of June 2022 there is an official notice asking people not to go inside the monument I only saw it after leaving because the sign is several metres away and opposite the direction you arrive from the car park. CianMcLiam Posted by CianMcLiam
8th June 2022ce

Mané Rutuel (Passage Grave) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Mané Rutuel</b>Posted by CianMcLiam CianMcLiam Posted by CianMcLiam
8th June 2022ce

Tumulus de Kercado (Tumulus (France and Brittany)) — Links

Howard Crowhurst and the Kercado Dolmen | Ancient Mathematics | N J Wildberger


Howard Crowhurst gives us a first hand expert tour of a remarkable megalithic site: the Kercado Dolmen in the Carnac region in Brittany France. At least 6000 years old, this kind of structure is regarded by some as a passage grave, but Howard does not agree with this interpretation.

In any case, it raises a lot of interesting questions, not least being how primitive peoples could have constructed such a site. That top rock forming the roof of the chamber is not to be trifled with! In addition, the seeming coincidence of the distance from this site to the Manio Giant being exactly 10,000 megalithic yards, a fundamental measurement deduced by Prof Thom from numerous surveys, is intriguing.

For some reason, this idea of a dolmen seems to have been very wide spread. Not just in Europe, but into Asia as well --examples are even found in Korea. Why were ancient people so interested in this particular kind of construction?

Many thanks to Howard for presenting this fascinating material so well!
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
15th November 2021ce

Quadrilataire de Manio (Tertre Tumulaire) — Links

Howard Crowhurst and the Manio Conception Triangle | Ancient Mathematics | N J Wildberger


In this video and the following we introduce Howard Crowhurst's significant discoveries of two remarkable 3-4-5 triangles---the Life triangles--- at an area famous for the Manio Giant menhir at Carnac in Brittany. These are probably the first 3-4-5 triangles known in history, and Howard has discovered that these configurations bring together ancient astronomical alignments, geometry and the biology of conception and fertility.

Howard's remarkable analysis of this site deserves wider recognition and study. I am grateful to him for giving me a personal tour of the area and his fascinating explanation of it. It opens up a lot of questions about Neolithic thinking!
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
15th November 2021ce

Howard Crowhurst and the Manio Fertility Triangle | Ancient Mathematics | N J Wildberger


This video continues to describe Howard Crowhurst's remarkable discoveries in the Manio area of Carnac in Brittany of Neolithic geometry. Here he shows us a second 3-4-5 triangle adjacent to the Conception Triangle; this one is the Fertility Triangle and it is marked by another square stone at the perpendicular corner of this triangle.

The exact dimensions of this triangle are 30,40 and 50 megalithic yards, using the fundamental unit established by Prof Alexander Thom after his study of 600 megalithic sites across England, Scotland, Wales and France.

The hypotenuse of this Fertility Triangle is then the East-West line marked also by the Autumn Equinox, which is 9 months after the Winter Solstice when the shadow of the Manio Giant penetrates the two Portal stones. Do we have here Neolithic Family Planning? What other secrets could this site be holding?

As Howard comments, this area really deserves some serious attention from archeologists! It raises a lot of questions about our understanding of the level of mathematics and astronomy of Neolithic people.
Nucleus Posted by Nucleus
15th November 2021ce

Alignements de Kerzerho — Images

<b>Alignements de Kerzerho</b>Posted by costaexpress<b>Alignements de Kerzerho</b>Posted by costaexpress<b>Alignements de Kerzerho</b>Posted by costaexpress<b>Alignements de Kerzerho</b>Posted by costaexpress Posted by costaexpress
7th November 2021ce

Alignements de Ménec — Images

<b>Alignements de Ménec</b>Posted by costaexpress Posted by costaexpress
4th November 2021ce
Showing 1-10 of 986 posts. Most recent first | Next 10