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County Clare

County

Sites/groups in County Clare:

Ardataggle Wedge Tomb
Ardskeagh Wedge Tomb
2 sites
Ballycroum
10 posts
Ballyhickey Wedge Tomb
Ballykelly Wedge Tomb
7 posts
Ballymihil Wedge Tomb
Ballynastaig Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Ballytarsna Artificial Mound
6 posts
Barbane Wedge Tomb
2 posts
The Bargaining Stone - Inishcealtra Natural Rock Feature
Bealkelly Wedge Tomb
1 post
Bohateh North Chambered Tomb
7 posts
75 sites
The Burren
4 posts
Caher Dolmen / Quoit / Cromlech
3 posts
Cahermore Stone Fort / Dun
8 posts
Caherphuca Wedge Tomb
1 post
Cappaghkennedy Wedge Tomb
7 posts
Clooney Stone Row / Alignment
4 posts
Cloongaheen West Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Cloonyconry More Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Coolbaun Portal Tomb
3 posts
Coolnatullagh Wedge Tomb
1 post
1 site
Corbehagh Cup and Ring Marks / Rock Art
8 posts
Corbehagh Wedge Tomb
1 post
1 site
Corbehagh South Wedge Tomb
5 posts
3 sites
Craggaunowen Portal Tomb
3 posts
Craglea Natural Rock Feature
Crannagh Portal Tomb
2 posts
Craughaun Cemetery Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Curraghadoo Cairn(s)
3 posts
2 sites
Doolin Round Barrow(s)
2 posts
Doolin Stone Axe Production Site Ancient Mine / Quarry
1 post
Doonmeave Promontory Fort
Drummin Wedge Tomb
Fahy Wedge Tomb
7 posts
Formoyle More West Wedge Tomb
2 posts
1 site
Iniscaltra Christianised Site
1 post
Kilcarroll Rath
4 posts
Killaloe Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
Killian Bullaun Stone
5 posts
Killokennedy Wedge Tomb
10 posts
Knappogue Standing Stones
5 posts
Knappogue N Standing Stone / Menhir
5 posts
Knockshanvo Wedge Tomb
2 posts
Knockstoolery Standing Stone / Menhir
2 posts
1 site
Magh Adhair Artificial Mound
10 posts
Milltown Wedge Tomb
15 posts
Mooghaun Hillfort
10 posts
Moyree Commons Portal Tomb
12 posts
Newgrove Wedge Tomb
4 posts
Rosslara Wedge Tomb
11 posts
Teergonean Court Tomb
7 posts
1 site
Tyredagh Lower Standing Stone / Menhir
Violethill Wedge Tomb

News

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6,000 year old Tsunami in Ireland?


Archeologists have uncovered evidence of pre-farming people living in the Burren more than 6,000 years ago — one of the oldest habitations ever unearthed in Ireland... continues...
mascot Posted by mascot
10th May 2012ce
Edited 11th May 2012ce

Folklore

Add folklore Add folklore
(As usual when it comes to Ireland I am being a bit pathetic with pinning the stories to locations. But I hope the locations still exist).
.. Avowedly malignant ceremonies have been performed at two, if not three, places in East Clare. At Carnelly, near Clare Castle, at an unknown period remote even in 1840, "a black cock, without a white feather," was offered to the Devil on the so-called "Druid's Altar," two fallen pillars near an earthen ring beside the avenue, --to avenge the sacrificer on an enemy, but in this case it brought an equivalent misfortune on the sacrificer himself.

The Duchess de Rovigo, an heiress of the last Stamer of Carnelly, used the story, combined with irrelevant family legends and pseudo-archaeology, in a poem dated 1839, but I obtained it, as given above, from a more reliable source, her mother, in 1875 and 1882, as well as from my brothers and sisters, who heard it in "the forties".

When I was at the dolmen near the house at Maryfort in 1869, an old servant, Mrs. Eliza Ega (nee Armstrong), said to me, -- "Don't play at that bad place where the dhrudes (druids), glory be to God! offered black cocks to the Devil!"
A Folklore Survey of County Clare (Continued)
Thos. J. Westropp
Folklore, Vol. 22, No. 1. (Mar. 31, 1911), pp. 49-60.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
7th December 2007ce

Links to lots of folklore at the Clare County Library website (much of which relates to the ancient sites of Clare).
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/folklore/index.htm
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
20th June 2006ce

Links

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A Survey of Monuments in the Barony of Bunratty Lower, Co. Clare


A Survey of Monuments of Archaeological and Historical Interest in the Barony of Bunratty Lower, Co. Clare by William Gerrard Ryan

This part of the thesis discusses the various types of monuments of archaeological and historical interest that were noted in the Barony of Bunratty Lower, Co. Clare. Each type of site is examined in turn, under the headings: distribution, features, dating and related sites in Ireland.
fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
5th July 2007ce

Clare County Library


Links to information and photos of ancient monuments in the county.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
20th June 2006ce

Clare County Library


Historical maps of County Clare.
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
20th June 2006ce

Ring-Forts in the Barony of Moyarta, Co. Clare, and Their Legends


fitzcoraldo Posted by fitzcoraldo
9th January 2006ce

Latest posts for County Clare

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Derrynavahagh (Wedge Tomb) — Fieldnotes

The Caher river valley runs roughly north-south through the townland of Derrynavahagh. North of the townland there is a crossroads in Formoyle East where the Burren Way crosses, having descended from the northern slopes of Sliabh Eilbhe, heading east towards Gleninagh mountain. We had been further back along the Way earlier at Ballyelly enclosure and wedge tomb, but had spun our way around back up through Fanore and onto the Caher Valley road. I had kind of a loose plan that had gone out the window a few sites back so here we were, south of the crossroads, in the thick hazel scrub that has colonised so many parts of the Burren.

There is probably a better, safer, easier way to Derrynavahagh wedge tomb, south from the Burren Way perhaps, across the limestone pavement, but hindsight is a great thing. Right now I had a carload of barely interested teenagers and a half-interested friend, and even though Derrynavahagh is one of the finest examples in the Burren, I was close to giving up when I asked, “well, are yous up for it or what?” Up for it, as it turned out, was climbing up from the road south of the crossroads, after we had found a spot where the scrub had thinned out. After a few shrugs, and a sort of explanation of what ‘it’ entailed, we headed up.

The Burren terrain rises and falls in a series of terraces. Often the climb from one terrace to the other is only 10 metres. From what I could make out from the satellite photo I had (ah the pleasures of modern technology), we’d have a series of three climbs and a half a kilometre of a walk over varying ground. The ascent from the road to gain the first scrub-covered terrace was the hardest. The second ascent left us on our first bit of raw limestone pavement. This is what the Burren is really about and my companions were delighted. I headed for the third ascent and over to the tomb.

It’s semi-surrounded by a modern stone wall and is a stunner. Largely intact and isolated, it’s kind of an introverted megalithic explorer’s ultimate dream. It has the wedge shape, take-off and landing-strip profile that we all know and love. The massive capstone has broken at the rear of the chamber and doesn’t reach the backstone. There are a couple of slabs lying around that are or were part of the tomb but I couldn’t make out from whence they came. The triple walling on the eastern side is phenomenal, with the 2 metre tall standing stone beyond the chamber opening almost like a sentinel standing guard.

Aside from the magnificence of the tomb, the location has to be commented on. To the east the ridge rises towards Faunarooska townland with its three ruined tombs. West and south-west across the Caher river valley is the broad expanse of Sliabh Eilbhe, with its craggy terracing. North towards Black Head is Gleninagh mountain. It’s an area rich in isolated wonders and, without sounding like a tourist rep. or salesman, one could spend weeks here, lost in the mesmerising views both near and far, endlessly pondering the beauty and magnificence of the world.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
10th August 2020ce
Edited 22nd August 2020ce

Tober Grania (Wedge Tomb) — Folklore

The floor of the chamber is covered with a deposit of mud. The tomb is locally considered to be a holy well and offerings of coins, some quite recent, medals, broken glass, etc., lie on the lower roofstone. The interior of the chamber is littered with broken glass.
From p128 in 'Survey of the Megalithic Tombs of Ireland, vol 1 - County Clare' by Ruaidhri de Valera and Sean O Nuallain (1961).

In an article called 'A Folklore Survey of County Clare' in Folklore v22, 1911, it says, "The mud of the dolmen or "well" of Tobergrania at Ballycroum cured sore or short-sighted eyes."
Rhiannon Posted by Rhiannon
8th August 2020ce

Ballyelly (Wedge Tomb) — Fieldnotes

About a kilometre south of Fanore Beach a road climbs the lower northwest slopes of Sliabh Eilbhe in an almost southerly direction. This road meets the Burren Way walkers’ trail at Balliny North after about 2.5 kilometres. You can park here. Head back in a northeasterly direction along the Burren Way. The track is well walked and popular. It’s in that part of the Burren where there is still a thin cover of soil and vegetation, more dangerous for traversing than the denuded parts as the cover tends to hide the grykes that can result in a snapped ankle.

The walk to the enclosure, tomb and the hut site is about 2.5 kilometres of leisurely trekking. The stones and condition of the enclosure walls and the hut site are similar to those of the shattered and collapsed tomb. This could lead one to believe that they originate from the same era. I like to think that there was a bronze-age smallholding here which included the wedge tomb.

There’s not much to say about the tomb itself. It’s in a very collapsed state, but both sidetones seem to be there, along with a couple of roofslabs and a possible backstone. It is typical of the Burren wedge tomb class.

We spent a while here in the welcome but intermittent sunshine. The Burren terrain, like the Aran Islands to the west, seems to suck the noise of the world out of the atmosphere, enclosing the spirit in a bubble of peace and eeriness. We investigated the clochán about 250 metres to the south-east and then headed back to the track via the enclosure.
ryaner Posted by ryaner
6th August 2020ce

Derrynavahagh (Wedge Tomb) — Images (click to view fullsize)

<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner<b>Derrynavahagh</b>Posted by ryaner ryaner Posted by ryaner
6th August 2020ce
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